Faculty Directory

Richard Jackson

Associate Professor, Teaching, Curriculum, and Society

Department

TCS Teaching, Curriculum, and Society

Biography

Richard Jackson is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the nascent field of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  He first brought the UDL framework to Boston College in 1999 through a partnership with CAST and the Harvard Children’s Initiative to form the National Center for Accessing the General Curriculum. This federally funded Center’s role was to provide the nation with guidance on how best to include students with disabilities in a standards-based, public education. Today the design principles derived from the UDL framework are required by law and embedded in teacher education programs at Boston College and throughout the US.  In 2009 Jackson observed a gap in the kind of leadership necessary for implementing inclusive education. Again, through a partnership with CAST, Jackson won a five year leadership grant from the US Department of Education to train eight postdoctoral “UDL Fellows” whose efforts continue to advance this new field in improving results for students with disabilities. With the international call for inclusive education, UDL has emerged as a plausible and palpable implementation framework. In 2020, with colleague Sean Bracken from the University of Worcester in the UK, Jackson co-founded INCLUDE (the National Collaboratory for Leadership in Universally Designed Education). Jackson’s vision for INCLUDE is a “center without walls” that functions virtually as a community of practice among stakeholders committed to advancing inclusion world-wide

UDL’s twenty year presence at Boston College under Jackson’s leadership has been instrumental in the design of accessible blended learning courses and in the development of inclusive instructional practices campus wide. It serves as a striking example of what the university means by men and women in service to others where others includes individuals with disabilities.   

GLOBAL SPOTLIGHT
  • Prelude to INCLUDE (International Collaboratory for Leadership in Universally Designed Education). Presentation at the Third Pan-Canadian Conference on Universal Design for Learning. Royal Roads University, Victoria, British Columbia. 
  • Invited keynote lecture for a national seminar held at the University of Worcester, UK, entitled Promoting Universal Accessibility in Higher Education: The Role of Information Technologies.
  • Presentation in Dublin, Ireland entitled: Journey to Oz: Travelling together towards inclusive education, sponsored by AHEAD.

Selected Publications

  • Jackson, R. M., & Lapinski, S. D. (2019). Restructuring the blended learning environment on campus for equity and opportunity through UDL. In S. Bracken & K. Novak (Eds.), Transforming Higher Education Through Universal Design for Learning (pp. 297–311). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Rose, D. H., Robinson, K.H., Hall, T. E., Coyne, P., Jackson, R. M., Stahl, W. M. & Wilcauskas, S. L. (2018). Accurate and informative for all: Universal design for learning (UDL) and the future of assessment. In Elliott, S.N., Kettler, R.J., Beddow, P.A., & Kurz, A. (Eds.) Handbook of Accessible Instruction and Testing Practices. New York: Springer.
  • Jackson, R. M. & Karger, J. (2015). Audio-Supported Reading and Students with Learning Disabilities. Wakefield, MA: MA: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials at the Center for Applied Special Technology. http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2015/audio-supported-reading-learning-disabilities-asr-ld.html
  • Jackson, R. M. & Hendricks, V. (2014). Foundations in Audio-Supported Reading for Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired with an Annotated Bibliography. Wakefield, MA: MA: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials at the Center for Applied Special Technology. http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2014/foundations-audio-supported-reading-blind-visually-impaired-annotated-bibliography.html
  • Jackson, R. M. (2014). Getting Started with Audio-Supported Reading: A Resource for Parents, Educators and Students. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials at the Center for Applied Special Technology. http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2014/getting-started-asr.html
  • Jackson, R. M. (2012). Audio-Supported Reading for Students who Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials at the Center for Applied Special Technology. http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2012/audio-supported-reading-blind-visually-impaired-asr.html    
  • Jackson, R. M. (2007). The Need for Progress Monitoring to Support the Participation of Students with Visual Disabilities in Standards-Based Reform. Washington, D.C.: National Center on Student Progress Monitoring, American Institutes of Research.
  • Hall, T., Jackson, R., Hitchcock, C., Gordon, D., & Rose, D. (2006). Issue Brief: Modifying Curriculum for Students with Disabilities and the Alternative Promise of Universal Design for Learning. Wakefield, MA: Center for Applied Special Technology.
  • Jackson, R. M. (2005). Curriculum Access for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities: The Promise of Universal Design for Learning. Wakefield, MA: Center for Applied Special Technology http://aem.cast.org/about/publications/2005/ncac-curriculum-access-low-incidence-udl.html
  • Hitchcock, C.G., Meyer, A., Rose, D., & Jackson, R. (2005). Equal access, participation, and progress in the general education curriculum. In D. Rose, A. Meyer and C. Hitchcock, (Eds). The universally designed classroom: Accessible curriculum and digital technologies (pp. 37-68). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  • Jackson, R. & Harper, K. (2005). Teacher planning for accessibility: The universal design of learning environments. In D. Rose, A. Meyer and C. Hitchcock, (Eds). The universally designed classroom: Accessible curriculum and digital technologies (pp. 101-124). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  • Jackson, R., Harper, K., & Jackson, J. (2005). Teaching for accessibility: Effective practices, classroom barriers. In D. Rose, A. Meyer and C. Hitchcock, (Eds). The universally designed classroom: Accessible curriculum and digital technologies (pp. 125-148). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  • Jackson, R.M. (2004). Technologies Supporting Access to the General Curriculum for Students with Disabilities. Wakefield, MA: Center for Applied Special Technology.