Lynch School of Education and Human Development

The Lynch School of Education and Human Development (LSEHD) offers undergraduate and graduate programs in education, transformative studies, and applied psychology and human development.

The mission of the Lynch School of Education and Human Development is to improve the human condition through improved applied practice and education. It pursues this goal through excellence and ethics in teaching, research, and service. It prepares undergraduate and graduate students to serve diverse populations in a variety of professional roles including as teachers, administrators, human service providers, psychologists, researchers, policy analysts, educational consultants, training and knowledge-transfer experts, professional development providers, executive coaches, instructional designers, and other roles in business human capital and talent development, government, NGOs, foundations, and cultural organizations.

Through research, LSEHD seeks to advance knowledge in its respective fields, inform policy, and improve practice. Teachers, psychologists, scholars, and learners in LSEHD engage in collaborative school and community improvement efforts locally, nationally, and internationally. What unites the diverse work conducted within the Lynch School of Education and Human Development is the underlying aspiration to enhance the human condition, to expand the human imagination, and to make the world more just.

The Lynch School of Education and Human Development is named in honor of Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch. Peter Lynch, a Boston College graduate, is one of the country’s best-known financial investors.

Undergraduate Programs

Undergraduate students in the Lynch School may choose to major in Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Transformative Educational Studies, or Applied Psychology and Human Development. All students entering LSEHD undergraduate programs follow a program of study in selected majors and minors and complete the Boston College Common Core requirements and electives needed to fulfill degree requirements.

Elementary Education

Elementary Education majors should enroll in EDUC1030 Child Growth and Development in the fall of their first year. This course will also satisfy one BC Core Social Science requirement. In the Spring of the first year, students should enroll in EDUC1031 Family, School, and Society. This course will satisfy one BC Core Social Science and the Cultural Diversity requirement. During the first year, Elementary Education students may also elect to begin the sequence for their second major. All Elementary Education majors must complete a second major either in a content area in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, Transformative Educational Studies, Applied Psychology and Human Development, or in one of three interdisciplinary majors offered through the Lynch School. Interdisciplinary majors include: American Heritages, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Perspectives on Spanish America.

Secondary Education

Secondary Education students should enroll in either EDUC1050 The Educational Conversation (Philosophy I, Core) or EDUC1030 Child Growth and Development (Social Science Core) in the fall of their first year. In the Spring of the first year, students should enroll in EDUC1051 Reimagining School and Society (Social Science and Cultural Diversity) or EDUC1031 Family, School, and Society (Social Science and Cultural Diversity). Secondary Education majors must also major in a state-approved licensure area. These areas include Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Geoscience, Physics, English, History, Mathematics, French, and Hispanic Studies. Students may also elect to begin the sequence for the desired second major during the first year. In particular, students declaring a major in Mathematics, the Sciences or Foreign Language should strongly consider beginning those majors in the first year.

All elementary and secondary education majors complete three pre-practicum experiences (1 day/week for 10 weeks) and one full practicum experience (5 days/week for 14 weeks) in a variety of classrooms where they mediate theory and practice to develop and provide instruction that enhances the developmental outcomes of all individuals. All Elementary and Secondary Education programs lead to endorsement for an Initial Licensure in the state of Massachusetts. These programs may change in response to state licensure regulations. All students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass all the appropriate Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), regardless of which state students wish to teach in.

Graduates from Elementary and Secondary Education programs attain positions in public, private, parochial, and charter schools, other education-related fields, and areas that require strong liberal arts, subject matter, and pedagogical preparation and the ability to collaborate with others.

Transformative Educational Studies

The Transformative Educational Studies Major is intended for students who wish to study the fundamental educational questions arising during this moment of social and educational transformation and contribute to improving the quality of human experience and to making society more just. The major is designed for students who are interested in careers in education such as: policy analysis; educational consulting; training and knowledge-transfer programs; professional development; executive coaching; instructional design, and other roles in business and human capital and talent development, government, NGOs, foundations, and cultural organizations, as well as, classroom teaching, but who either do not need licensure or wish to defer that aspect to a Fifth Year or Master’s program.

Transformative Educational Studies students should enroll in EDUC1050 The Educational Conversation in the fall of the first year. This course will also satisfy the Philosophy I BC Core requirement. In the Spring, students should enroll in EDUC1051 Reimagining School and Society. This course will satisfy one Social Science and the Cultural Diversity requirement. This major does not require a second major or minor, but students may elect to begin the sequence for a second major or for minor(s) at any point where there is sufficient time to complete the program of study for the second major or minor(s).

Applied Psychology and Human Development

The Applied Psychology and Human Development major prepares students for work in human, social, and community services and/or for graduate study in counseling, human development, educational psychology, organizational studies, higher education, and related fields. Coursework in this major curriculum offers a theoretical base in developmental and counseling psychology with a focus on understanding psychological processes in a variety of contexts.

Students in Applied Psychology and Human Development in the Class of 2023 and beyond enroll in a 36 credit major, with a required applied psychology practicum experience, and foci in a choice of five areas: human services and health science; organization studies and human capital; policy, advocacy, and community change; science of learning; and design-thinking and innovation. Students in the Class of 2023 and beyond are not required to declare a minor or second major; however, students are encouraged to consider the many minor and major options available in LSEHD and across Boston College. In addition, there are a number of Fifth Year Programs available for academically superior students through which the bachelor's and the master's degrees may be earned in five years. Please refer to the section following the descriptions of majors in the Lynch School of Education and Human Development for more information about these programs.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Lynch School of Education and Human Development students who are Elementary or Secondary Education majors must successfully complete 120 credits which must include the Core curriculum, the education major, and an appropriate second major. Students who are majoring in Transformative Educational Studies or Applied Psychology and Human Development must also successfully complete 120 credits, which must include the Core curriculum.

To continue enrollment in a full-time program of study, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 1.667, as the minimum standard of scholarship and must not fall more than 6 credits behind the total number of credits a student of his/her status is expected to have completed (Elementary and Secondary Education majors usually carry 15–17 credits each semester during the first three years and 30 credits during the senior year). For example, a first semester sophomore student must have completed at least 30–32 credits during the freshman year. Any student who is permitted by the LSEHD Dean of Undergraduate Programs and Students to continue enrollment in a full-time undergraduate program is considered to be in good standing.

Failure to maintain good standing either through a low cumulative grade point average or by incurring excessive deficiencies including failures, withdrawals, or unapproved underloads will result in placement on academic probation, possible withdrawal or dismissal, as determined by Dean of Undergraduate Programs and Students in consultation with Lynch Academic Standards Committee.

A student on probation may return to good standing by approved methods, e.g., make-up of credits via approved summer schoolwork, raising GPA to acceptable standards, etc. (Students may make up no more than 12 credits in summer study.) A student who incurs additional failures or withdrawals, or carries an unapproved underload while on probation, may be required to withdraw from the institution at the time of the next review.

Information for First Year Students

Although students may satisfy Core requirements (42 credits) during any of their four undergraduate years, they are advised to complete most or, if possible, all BC Core requirements within the first two years. The remaining 78 credits (minimum) are to be fulfilled by courses required in the major(s), minor(s), and elective choices.

All first semester, first year students should select ENGL1010 First Year Writing Seminar or a Core Literature course, EDUC1050 The Educational Conversation or EDUC/APSY1030 Child Growth and Development, ERAL1100 First Year ERA Seminar, and the course(s) designated by your major department. (Students who place out of BC Core courses in advance will take different courses selected in collaboration with an advisor.) Major requirements are listed in the sections that follow. Students who have not declared a major, and are listed as ‘Undeclared,’ follow the course requirements for the Transformative Educational Studies or the Applied Psychology and Human Development majors.

The First Year Experience, Reflection, and Action Seminar (First Year ERA), a 3-credit course (1 credit first semester and 2 credits second semester), is a requirement for all LSEHD students and is taken as a sixth course during first and second semesters, freshman year.

Students in the Lynch School must elect one of four majors: Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Transformative Educational Studies or Applied Psychology and Human Development. 

As pre-professional majors, both Elementary and Secondary Education majors require an appropriate second major, successful completion of 120 credits, including the Boston College Core curriculum.

Transformative Educational Studies and Applied Psychology and Human Development majors must complete the major, successful completion of 120 credits, including the Boston College Core curriculum. Students in these majors may elect a second major or minor(s) from a wide variety of options in LSEHD and across Boston College.

The University Core Curriculum offers an essential liberal arts foundation that grounds and informs most of the coursework you will explore during your time at Boston College. Although some students complete much of the Core by the end of sophomore year, we suggest that students consider Core course options carefully. The interdisciplinary Complex Problems and Enduring Questions Core courses are available to first year students only, and combine research, service, critical reflection, and off-site experiences in an engaging, nontraditional manner. Lynch School students who enroll in one of the Complex Problems or Enduring Questions Core courses should use caution in electing Core courses that may also be satisfied by the major requirements.

The Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs and Students, Associate Director or Assistant Director of the Office of Undergraduate Programs must approve a program of study in the declared LSEHD major before the end of sophomore year.

Students seeking a major leading to teacher licensure must complete and submit a Declaration of Major form and an application for Admission to a Teacher Education Program to the Office of Undergraduate Programs. This office reviews applications and accepts qualified applicants prior to the end of the sophomore year. Early application to the program is encouraged. Transformative Educational Studies and Applied Psychology and Human Development majors need to complete a Declaration of Major form with the LSEHD Office of Undergraduate Programs.

The remaining courses required for graduation include additional major courses, minor courses, and electives.

Practicum Experiences Leading to Teacher Licensure

Endorsement for license is a collaborative effort between the teacher candidate, Lynch School Assistant Dean of Field Placement and Outreach, Program Supervisor, and the Supervising Practitioner. The Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach, Campion 102, approves and arranges placements for pre-practica and full-practica leading to licensure only for eligible students enrolled in programs in LSEHD. Placement for full practicum also requires prospective teacher candidates to complete a successful interview with the Principal/Headmaster and/or potential Supervising Practitioner from the school in which they plan to fulfill this requirement. The Assistant Dean of Field Placement and Outreach evaluates each placement to ensure that it meets the requirements for endorsement and licensure by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. The Assistant Dean of Field Placement and Outreach, for appropriate reasons, may choose not to approve a teacher candidate for the practicum. All teacher candidates seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the appropriate Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) regardless of which state(s) students wish to teach in upon graduation. Pre-practica and full practica are essential components and experiences of the teacher preparation curriculum in the Lynch School. Teacher candidates must complete three semesters of pre-practicum placements (1 day/week/10 days) before they enter a full-time practicum placement in Elementary and Secondary Education classrooms. A full description of policies may be found in the Practicum Handbook available in the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach in Campion 102.

A full practicum (student teaching) is a full-time five-days-per-week experience that occurs for a minimum of 14 weeks during the senior year. In the Lynch School, a full practicum must meet the teaching performance standards required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Teacher candidates must demonstrate competence according to the standards outlined in the Boston College Candidate Assessment of Performance (BC-CAP). The semester prior to completing a field placement, students must formally apply and participate in an interview in the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach before securing a field assignment. Subject to eligibility, teacher candidates submit an online application for pre-practicum and practicum experiences. Online applications are available at the Student Teaching page.

All students seeking teacher licensure must complete the full practicum. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and successful completion of all major courses are required prior to student teaching for all students in the Elementary program. Students in Secondary Education must complete all major courses in Secondary Education and 4/5 of Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences courses prior to student teaching. No incomplete grades may be outstanding, and a minimum of 87 credits must have been completed before placement is approved.

A full description of policies may be found in the Practicum Handbook available in the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach in Campion 102. All students will be screened for eligibility, and any who fail to meet the standards (academic, health, professional) will be counseled into courses that will complete an appropriate degree program from Boston College. These students will not be recommended for endorsement for teacher licensure and will not receive the BC Endorsement (a recommendation for licensure). The Commonwealth of Massachusetts issues teacher licenses, not the endorsing university. Therefore, students who earn the BC Endorsement submit all licensing documentation directly to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Students will not be allowed to overload courses while student teaching. If, for any reason, a student is unable to complete the full practicum, an extended practicum (additional time in the field and/or semester) will be required by arrangement of the Assistant Dean of Field Placement and Outreach.

Application deadlines for all pre-practica are May 1 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements. Application deadlines for all full-practica are March 15 for fall placements and October 15 for spring placements. The Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach will not be able to arrange assignments for late applicants. Applications are submitted online at the Student Teaching page.

The school sites utilized for pre-practica and full-practica are located in Boston and neighboring communities. Teacher candidates are responsible for their own transportation to and from these facilities.

Applied Psychology and Human Development Field Practicum

Applied Psychology and Human Development students should visit the Applied Psychology and Human Development page for information on practicum experiences for this major and register for APSY2152 in the semester during which they will complete their field practicum experience. Students in the Class of 2023 and beyond may register for a practicum no sooner than second semester of sophomore year, preferably junior or senior year, or after having successfully completed a minimum of twelve (12) credits of APSY courses.

International and Special Practicum Placement Field Experiences

Lynch School students may participate in the International Programs described in the University Policies and Procedures section of this catalog.

The Lynch School's International and Special Practicum Placement Program offer opportunities for undergraduate coursework in a variety of foreign countries for pre- and full-practicum placements. International settings include classrooms in such countries as Switzerland, Ireland, England, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Mexico. For information regarding programs and requirements, contact the Office of Practicum Partnerships and Professional Development in Campion 102.

Majors in Education

The undergraduate teacher education majors in LSEHD are intended to meet the requirements for endorsement towards Initial Licensure as a teacher of the Massachusetts Department of Education. The Lynch School of Education and Human Development accreditation process and the Interstate Licensure Compact (ICC) facilitate licensure in other states. Licensure requirements are set by each state, however, and are subject to change. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass all appropriate tests of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure. All students must consult with the Office of Practicum Partnerships and Professional Development to review the most recent licensure requirements of Massachusetts and other states.

The Lynch School offers two minors and one concentration for Education majors—Middle School Mathematics Teaching, Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings, and a Special Education Concentration. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is mandating that all teacher candidates complete a specific bilingual course. Please consult the Chair of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Curriculum and Instruction or the Associate Dean of Undergraduates at LSEHD for the most current information.

The concentration in Special Education is designed to prepare students to work with a diverse group of special needs learners. In light of a growing national movement for further inclusion of special needs students in regular classrooms, teachers must be able to accommodate special needs students in their classrooms. All education students are strongly urged to consider this important concentration. Detailed information on the concentration in Special Education can be found in the minors section of the Lynch School catalog and on the Lynch School website.

The minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching is available to Elementary Education majors with a Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences Mathematics major or Mathematics/Computer Science interdisciplinary major, or to Secondary Education majors with a Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences Mathematics major. Teachers of middle school mathematics are in great need in the United States, and all eligible Lynch School students should investigate this option. For more information on the minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching, consult the minors section of the Lynch School catalog and the Lynch School website.

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Major in Transformative Educational Studies

A degree in Transformative Educational Studies from Boston College is one of a kind. Students study the fundamental educational questions arising during this moment of social and educational transformation and learn how to reflect on the direction and purposes of their own education. Students learn how to make authentic contributions to improve the quality of human experience and to make society more just. The Transformative Educational Studies program features coursework that covers leading theories and strategies in Curriculum, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Global Perspectives, and Formative Education. The major is designed for students who are interested in careers in education such as: policy analysis; educational consulting; training and knowledge-transfer programs; professional development; executive coaching; instructional design, and other roles in business and human capital and talent development, government, NGOs, foundations, and cultural organizations, as well as, classroom teaching, but who either do not need licensure or wish to defer that aspect to a Fifth Year or Master’s program.

Transformative Educational Studies students should enroll in EDUC1050 The Educational Conversation in the fall of the first year. This course will also satisfy the Philosophy I BC Core requirement. In the Spring, students should enroll in EDUC1051 Reimagining School and Society. This course will satisfy one Social Science and the Cultural Diversity requirement. This major does not require a second major or minor, but students may elect to begin the sequence for a second major or for minor(s) at any point where there is sufficient time to complete the program of study for the second major or minor(s).

In this major, students focus on:

  • What does it mean to be an educated person?
  • Is schooling primarily a force for social reproduction or social change?
  • How will education evolve in light of paradigmatic shifts in the nature of technology and media, literacy, and work?
  • What type of learning leads to personal and social transformation?
  • How will education respond to contemporary social, environmental, and health crises?
  • What does it mean to be an educator?
  • How to serve diverse and increasingly globalized student populations?
  • This major also provides opportunities for students to pursue their own interests through a variety of elective courses.
     

While Transformative Educational Studies (TES) majors are not required to have a second major or minor, many TES majors do declare and complete second majors and minors. The minimum number of credits acceptable for most minors is 18, which may include applicable BC Core courses. The concentration in Special Education however, requires only 12 credits. The minor in Management and Leadership, offered in collaboration with the Carroll School of Management, is another excellent option for students planning to work in business, human capital, or industry. The Lynch School of Education and Human Development also offers a number of specialized interdisciplinary minors including: Research, Evaluation and Measurement; Restorative and Transformational Justice; Immigration, Education and Humanitarian Studies; Communication; Cyberstrategy and Design; Design-Thinking and Innovation; Education Theatre; Korean Studies; Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings. Approved areas of study for majors and minors are listed under the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, the Carroll School of Management (CSOM minors only), and the Lynch School of Education and Human Development for LSEHD’s interdisciplinary majors, second majors, and specialized interdisciplinary minors. Please consult the Chair of the Teaching, Curriculum and Society Department or the LSEHD Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs and Students Office (Campion 104) for the most current information.

Major in Applied Psychology and Human Development

The major in Applied Psychology and Human Development consists of course offerings in developmental psychology, personality theories, educational psychology, and related fields. It provides a basic foundation for careers in social service and community settings or for graduate study in many fields of psychology, including counseling, developmental or educational psychology, organizational studies, business, and social work. This major prepares students for entry-level employment as support personnel in offices of senior professional psychologists and counselors and in settings such as child/adult residential or day care facilities and alternative educational, community, or business settings. Ten courses or a minimum of 30 credits are required for the major for students in the Classes 2021 and 2022. A twelve course (36 credit) major is required for students in the Class of 2023 and beyond.

Classes 2021 and 2022: The Applied Psychology and Human Development major requires five specified courses and five additional courses selected from the following concentrations: Human Services, Organization Studies, and Community, Advocacy and Social Policy. Each concentration includes 2–3 courses and/or 2–3 electives. Classes 2023 and beyond requires six specified courses and six additional courses selected from the following concentrations: Human Services and Health Science; Organization Studies and Human Capital; Policy, Advocacy and Community Change; Science of Learning; Design-Thinking and Innovation.

Learning outcomes for Applied Psychology and Human Development majors include:

  • Outcome 1: Understand the processes of human development and learning from infancy into late adolescence or the transition to adulthood.
  • Outcome 2: Understand how social and cultural contexts shape developmental and educational processes.
  • Outcome 3: Understand how contemporary social problems affect children, families, and communities.
  • Outcome 4: Use foundational theories of applied psychology and human development to analyze educational and other real-world settings.
  • Outcome 5: Articulate a researchable theoretical argument and apply appropriate research techniques to empirical analysis.
  • Outcome 6: Articulate their personal core values and beliefs, how these are informed by critical engagement with theoretical and empirical knowledge in applied psychology and human development, and how these inform their relationships with their families and communities.
  • Outcome 7: Develop a specialized understanding of 1 of 3 areas:
    • Human Services: Basic knowledge of psychosocial challenges to normal development and of a range of individual and community-level strategies to prevent mental illness and enhance psychosocial well-being and mental health;
    • Organizational Studies—Human Resources: Basic knowledge of organizational behavior theories, their applications in human resource management, and the contributions of applied psychology in these contexts.
    • Community, Advocacy and Social Policy: Basic knowledge of theories of community psychology and the applications of psychological knowledge to advocacy and social policy for and with children, youth and their families, and communities.
       

The Applied Psychology and Human Development major does not provide for state licensure as a classroom teacher.

Students in the Class of 2023 and beyond are not required to declare a minor or major; however, they are encouraged to consider additional minor or majors that are available. Students in the Classes 2021 and 2022, who are pursuing Applied Psychology and Human Development as their primary major within the Lynch School, regardless of class year, are required to complete coursework in one of the following:

  • A minor of 18 credits in a single subject discipline in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, in Management and Leadership in the Carroll School of Management, in a variety of Lynch School minors including: Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings; Research, Evaluation, and Measurement; Restorative and Transformational Justice; Immigration, Education, and Humanitarian Studies; Communication; Cyberstrategy and Design; Design-Thinking and Innovation; Education Theatre; Korean Studies; or in other specialized interdisciplinary minors
  • A major or an interdisciplinary minor (e.g., African and African Diaspora Studies, Women's and Gender Studies) in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences; or
  • A second major or interdisciplinary major in the Lynch School.
     

The minimum number of credits acceptable for most minors is 18, which may include applicable Core courses. The concentration in Special Education (which does not satisfy the required minor (Classes of 2021 and 2022) for students in Applied Psychology and Human Development), however, requires only 12 credits. The minor in Management and Leadership, offered in collaboration with the Carroll School of Management, is another excellent option for students planning to work in business or industry. The Lynch School of Education and Human Development also offers a number of specialized interdisciplinary minors as mentioned above: Research, Evaluation, and Measurement; Restorative and Transformational Justice; Immigration, Education, and Humanitarian Studies; Communication; Cyberstrategy and Design; Design-Thinking and Innovation; Education Theatre; Korean Studies; Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings. Students who have a second major automatically fulfill the minor requirement. Approved areas of study for majors and minors are listed under the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, the Carroll School of Management (CSOM minors only), and the Lynch School of Education and Human Development for interdisciplinary majors and specialized interdisciplinary minors.

Additional detailed information for Applied Psychology and Human Development majors is available on Applied Psychology and Human Development page. There is a link at the bottom of this page for details about course requirements. There are also links from this page to a list of faculty who teach in the program, field practicum courses, supporting fields of study, and study abroad opportunities, as well as information about future career choices. For those students in the Classes 2021 and 2022, it is strongly recommended that all students pursue a field practicum course which includes ten hours a week of volunteer work in community, business, or human service agencies or programs, and a weekly seminar. Students who are interested in pursuing an Applied Psychology and Human Development Practicum should seek information in Campion Hall 102. Students in the Class of 2023 and beyond may enroll in a 3-credit practicum, beginning in the sophomore spring semester, or after completing 12 credits in the Applied Psychology and Human Development major.

Second Majors and Interdisciplinary Majors for Lynch School Students

All students in LSEHD pursuing an Education major leading to endorsement for teaching licensure are required to complete a second major in the Lynch School of Education and Human Development, or in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, or an interdisciplinary major as outlined below. Elementary Education majors may declare Transformative Educational Studies, an Interdisciplinary Major, or Applied Psychology and Human Development as their second major. Applied Psychology and Human Development majors (Classes 2021 and 2022) are also required to carry a minor of 18 credits in a single subject discipline in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, a major or an interdisciplinary minor in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, or a LSEHD second major, interdisciplinary major, or specialized interdisciplinary minor. Acceptable interdisciplinary majors and minors are listed below. Students in the Class of 2023 and beyond with majors in Transformative Educational Studies or Applied Psychology and Human Development are not required to declare a second major or minor but are encouraged to do so.

Lynch School Majors

Interdisciplinary Majors

Interdisciplinary majors are based in two or more Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences disciplines that are relevant to teaching in elementary school settings. Each of these majors is available to students in LSEHD pursuing Elementary Education, Transformative Educational Studies, and Applied Psychology and Human Development. Students should consult their advisors regarding the specific courses required for these interdisciplinary majors.

Note: Secondary Education students cannot receive endorsement towards teaching licensure in any of these interdisciplinary major areas. Secondary endorsement for licensure requires a Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences second major in one of the specific subject disciplines listed under the description of Secondary Education requirements.

Transformative Educational Studies and Applied Psychology and Human Development majors may choose a second LSEHD major or one of the LSEHD interdisciplinary majors listed below or a Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences major.

American Heritages

Recommended for students who are interested in the American heritage from literary and historical perspectives. Two tracks are available for students pursuing this major: a cultural track with emphasis in the literary perspective, and a social science track for students interested in historical and sociological perspectives.

Mathematics/Computer Science

This major is recommended for students who have had four years of high school mathematics and wish to specialize in the area of mathematics and computer science but who are not interested in the traditional Mathematics major because of their intended career objective as elementary, early childhood, or special needs educators. Many students who complete this interdisciplinary major in conjunction with Applied Psychology and Human Development or Elementary Education go on to acquire licensure to teach mathematics at the secondary level by fulfilling master’s degree requirements in Secondary Education through the Fifth Year Program.

Perspectives on Spanish America

Recommended for students who may have had at least two years of high school Spanish and wish to develop Spanish language skills, this minor is to be coupled with a background in the historical, sociological, and literary traditions of Hispanic cultures.

Minors or Concentrations for Lynch School Students

A minor is most often an interdisciplinary link. It links students to another discipline or disciplines and changes and expands how they think about subjects, topics, fields of learning and practice, but also, expands how they think about life, people, working with others and the importance of interconnectivity. The impetus for new minors across subjects is in Boston College’s Strategic Plan. The first of the plan’s strategic directives is to foster a culture of learning that “promotes opportunities for students to integrate traditional liberal arts disciplines with professional preparation and vocational discernment.”

Lynch minors have students’ interest in mind and provide key opportunities for students to learn new concepts and subjects, as well as interdisciplinary expertise and skills. Lynch minors not only offer courses in interesting academic areas, more so ever than in the past, but they also offer traditional department related minors. Below are specialized minors for Lynch School students. Please consult the Office of Undergraduate Programs (Campion 104) for the most current information and/or to declare the following minors specifically for LSEHD students.

Cyberstrategy and Design Minor

The minor is designed to advance understanding of the intersections of cybersecurity and human behavior. Students will explore introductory and mastery level coursework, select electives from different departments, and engage in applied action projects and special topics research specially designated each year.

Design-Thinking and Innovation Minor

The minor is designed to advance understanding of Design-Thinking as an important tool for social impact and human-centered problem solving for our world. Students will explore introductory and mastery Design-Thinking coursework, select electives from different departments, and engage in social impact action/field-based projects specially designated each year.

Immigration, Education, and Humanitarian Studies Minor

The Immigration, Education, and Humanitarian Studies minor is designed to advance understanding of immigration and related educational and humanitarian topics. Students will explore introductory and mastery level coursework, select electives from both LSEHD and different Boston College schools and departments, and engage in applied action projects and special topics research specially designated each year.

Korean Studies Interdisciplinary Minor

The minor is designed to advance understanding of Korea as an important collaborator. Students will attain proficiency at or beyond the elementary level in the Korean language, select electives from different departments, and engage in an experience or project specially designated with our partner institutions in South Korea, following an interdisciplinary approach to a topic in education, applied psychology, and/or human development.

Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings Minor

This 18-credit minor is designed for students who may have an interest in institutions of higher education, in local and international non-government organizations (NGOs), and/or in community-based organizations and programs.

Middle School Mathematics Teaching Minor

A minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching is available to undergraduates who are either: Elementary Education majors (with an MCAS Mathematics major or a Mathematics/Computer Science Interdisciplinary major) or Secondary Education majors (with an MCAS Mathematics major). While the minor does not lead directly to middle school mathematics certification at Boston College (we do not offer middle school certification), it does fulfill the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics requirements for middle school teachers of mathematics. With this minor, acquiring middle school mathematics certification in Massachusetts should not be difficult.

Research, Evaluation, and Measurement Minor

The Research, Evaluation, and Measurement minor is designed to advance understanding research, evaluation, and measurement tools and practices. Students will explore topics as they relate to education, applied psychology, and human development.

Restorative and Transformational Justice Minor

The minor is designed to advance understanding of Restorative and Transformational Justice as a critical important tool. Students will explore Restorative and Transformational Justice topics as they relate to Transformative Education, Applied Psychology, and Human Development.

Special Education Concentration

The Special Education Concentration is available to Lynch School of Education and Human Development students only. This includes students majoring in Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Transformative Educational Studies, and Applied Psychology and Human Development who have an interest in special needs education.

Teaching English Language Learners (TELL) Certificate

The Lynch School of Education at Boston College offers a certificate program in Teaching English Language Learners (TELL). Candidates should be working toward a licensure in an education field (early childhood, elementary, secondary, reading, etc.). This program is designed to prepare mainstream teachers to work with bilingual learners/English Language Learners in their mainstream classroom settings. The certificate requires two courses and completion of a field experience in a classroom that includes bilingual learners.

Minors in the Carroll School of Management for Lynch School of Education and Human Development Students

There are six minors offered to non-management students: Accounting for CPAs, Accounting for Finance and Consulting, Finance, Management and Leadership, Managing for Social Impact and the Public Good, and Marketing. Interested students should visit bc.edu/csom-minors for more information.

Minors in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences for Lynch School of Education and Human Development Students

In addition to a multitude of MCAS department and interdisciplinary minors, open to the Lynch School undergraduates, students may also declare the following minors that were created for specifically for Lynch School students by contacting the Office of Undergraduate Programs.

Educational Theatre Minor

This minor provides drama education and theatre training to LSEHD students who hope to include theater as a subject they teach and practice in school settings and/or who want to use creative dramatics and applied theatre techniques as teaching tools in other institutional settings.

Communication Minor

This 18-credit minor introduces students to the field of Communication. Students enroll in four required courses and two electives.

Minors in the Lynch School for Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, Carroll School of Management, and Connell School of Nursing Students

Applied Psychology and Human Development Minor

This 18-credit minor may interest students who wish to (1) deepen their knowledge of human behavior in the areas of psychology, human development, and learning sciences in preparation for a career in fields such as human capital, consulting, research, consumer behavior, organizational studies, client relations, recruitment, marketing, advertising, counseling, public health, social, community and political advocacy, among others; (2) gain specialized knowledge in certain specific areas of human development and wellness: for example, counseling, training, personal assessment, family crisis assistance, substance abuse interventions, and child/aging/elderly care; or (3) prepare for employment in a government or private sector organizations.

Foundation in Education Minor

This 18-credit minor introduces students to courses in the fields of applied psychology and teacher education.

Inclusive Education Minor

This 18-credit minor is designed to (1) introduce students to the world of disabilities and special education, with an emphasis on special education practice, and (2) enhance the ability of future professionals to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of students in America’s schools.

Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings Minor

This 18-credit minor is designed for students who may have an interest in institutions of higher education, in local and international non-government organizations (NGOs), and/or in community-based organizations and programs.

Secondary Education Minor

This minor is open to Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences students who major in one of the following disciplines: English, Mathematics, History, Foreign Language, Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science, Physics, and who plan to pursue licensure to teach in high school. The minor is also open to CSOM or CSON students who would like to explore options for pursuing licensure to teach in high school.

Declaration of Minor Process

Students in MCAS, CSOM, and CSON who are interested in the Secondary Education Minor should make an appointment in with the Office of Undergraduate Programs. This minor requires early planning, an interview, an application, and a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

Graduation

For information regarding graduation, visit the Graduation section of Undergraduate Academic Policies.

This includes information on policies regarding such topics as:

  • Advanced Standing
  • Acceleration
     

The University awards degrees in May, August, and December of each year, although commencement ceremonies are held only in May.

Fifth Year and Early Admit Programs

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