Woods College of Advancing Studies

The James A. Woods, S.J., College of Advancing Studies offers both full- and part-time study to undergraduate and graduate students from widely differing backgrounds and preparations who wish to maximize their experiences and master the skills necessary to advance their future.

Boston College fosters in its students rigorous intellectual development coupled with religious, ethical, and personal formation in order to prepare them for citizenship, service, and leadership in a global society.

Within the context of the Boston College environment, James A. Woods, S.J., College of Advancing Studies promotes the care and attention to the human person that is the hallmark of Jesuit education while faculty and students engage in scholarship that enriches the culture and addresses important societal needs.

Undergraduate Programs

The James A. Woods, S.J., College of Advancing Studies offers the atmosphere of a small college within the environment of a large university. The professional staff at the James A. Woods, S.J., College of Advancing Studies have experience helping students arrange a realistic program of study, one that combines work responsibilities with educational goals. Students receive personal attention while enjoying access to the many resources of Boston College. A flexible admission process coupled with academic advising allows a student to select the most appropriate major based on individual needs. Courses are ordinarily scheduled between the hours of 6:15–9:35 p.m. on weekdays, with online and hybrid courses also available.

Bachelor of Arts Program

The Bachelor of Arts program prepares students to address and master the challenges of a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world. A broad-based and robust liberal arts curriculum, which includes Core requirements, permits students to choose courses and majors reflecting individual interests and varied career objectives. The curriculum offers intensive work and a degree of disciplined mastery in a major area.

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B.A., Applied Liberal Arts

Applied Liberal Arts (ALA) helps clarify connections between your education and your life, your job, and your future. The critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and cultural literacy skills valued by today’s employers are hallmarks of a liberal arts education. Our program also provides courses in high-demand workplace essentials such as project management, data visualization and analysis, design thinking, and conflict resolution.

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Applied Liberal Arts Concentrations

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B.A., Business

Students in the Business bachelor’s degree program develop skills in-demand by employers, including critical thinking, ethical leadership, quantitative analysis, communication, project management, and risk management. Through elective courses, students can align their degree and professional goals.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

  • ADAC1081 Financial Accounting
  • ADMT1801 Data Analysis and Probability
  • ADBM1430 Corporate Communication
  • ADMK2201 Digital Marketing Strategy
  • ADEC1101 Principles of Economics
  • ADIT3308 Project Management
  • ADBM3101 Management and Organizational Behavior
  • ADFN2000 Principles of Finance
  • ADLA2400 Business Law
  • ADSY4001 Strategic Leadership
  • 2 Business Electives
     

ADMT1801 may fulfill the quantitative reasoning Core requirement. ADEC1101 may fulfill one social science Core requirement.

Learning Outcomes

  • Critical Thinking: Apply analytical skills in a systematic manner to define a business problem/challenge or opportunity, develop potential solutions, select the “best” solution using the information/performance data available at the time, and prepare an implementation (rollout) and evaluation plan—with metrics for measuring successes and/or failures, as well as strategies for action-planning based on performance against these metrics. Critical thinking skills will be honed by studying the assigned learning resources and applying knowledge gained to present solutions to case studies and other real-world problems. Critical thinking skills are applicable in any business field and other disciplines where a logical, systematic approach to analysis is required.
  • Strategic Leadership: Translate strategic objectives into measurable plans and deploy the necessary resources in the most effective manner to achieve the desired results. Students will study the evolution of management theories, where applicable, and apply them to solve contemporary business problems. Students will gain this knowledge by participating in and leading small and large group projects, working within defined time constraints, and allocating available resources to achieve the desired results.
  • Quantitative Analysis: Solve problems using a defined approach that enables them to turn information into quantitative data and analyze that data to develop potential solutions. Students will be able to use their data analysis skills to find relationships among various types and sources of data and be able to use that data to enhance their understanding of an issue and strengthen their conclusions. They will become proficient at using standard industry software enabling them to organize, manipulate, and draw conclusions from available data. These skills will be learned by solving quantitative problems and presenting answers orally, as well as by analyzing case studies and completing projects.
  • Communication Skills: Communicate effectively in writing, person-to-person, and through presentations to large and small groups using a variety of electronic applications. Students will learn to define the objectives of the communication, understand the audience, craft the message, and deliver the message in the most appropriate manner to achieve the desired results. Practice of presentation skills will cover everything from personal conversations to mass marketing campaigns, and will use a multimedia approach. Students will enhance skills by studying successful campaigns and presenting their findings in individual and small group presentations. Standard industry software (such as Microsoft and Google applications) will be used extensively.
  • Risk Management: Apply working knowledge of risk management to identify and mitigate risks in organizations. Effective decision-making requires a knowledge of the benefits of each decision, as well as an understanding of the risk. Risks take many forms, including financial errors, operational errors, fraud, cybersecurity breaches, regulatory non-compliance, and common theft. Successful organizations use strong risk management programs as a defensive measure (i.e., to prevent losses, as well as to offensively preserve their reputation and enhance their overall competitive position). The key principles of risk management, including assessment and mitigation, are incorporated within many of the courses included in this major.
  • Ethical Leadership: Examine all situations through an ethical lens and apply principles of ethical decision-making in a business context. Along with the impact on the overall performance of the organization, students will assess the possible legal, environmental, financial, and human resource impacts of their decisions with an emphasis on the effects on historically marginalized groups. Concepts of ethical decision making will be at the core of all the courses at Woods College and will be consistently reinforced throughout the entire curriculum.
  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI): Optimize the use of skills of all individuals in their respective organizations by developing long-term solutions that recognize the ability of each individual—and integrate those skills to create a more talented, diverse, inclusive, and equitable environment. DEI, along with ethical decision-making, will allow students to develop necessary skills to lead diverse teams that will strategically impact organizational culture and performance. An understanding of DEI will be provided through lectures, case studies, and observation of the overall culture at Woods College.

B.A., Communication

Acquire an in-depth understanding of the many ways communication affects—and is affected by—modern societies. Ranging in focus from interpersonal communication to how advertisers, political campaigns, and the media employ mass communication, this major equips you to analyze information across several facets of life.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADBM2235 Principles of Advertising
  • ADBM3300 Advanced Advertising
  • ADCO1005 Introduction to Communication
  • ADCO1020 Survey of Mass Communication
  • ADCO5041 Persuasive Communication
  • ADPS1153 Research Methods for the Social Sciences
  • Communication electives: select 2 courses
     

Learning Outcomes

  • At the end of the program, students will be able to bring theories of interpersonal, relationship, group, and organizational communication to bear on the analysis of social phenomena.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to bring theories of mass communication to bear on the analysis of the media.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to apply social scientific research methods to particular case studies.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to communicate effectively, orally and in writing.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to make informed ethical judgments concerning the role of mass communication in society.

B.A., Criminal and Social Justice

This flexible B.A. program explores the intersection of criminal and social justice through the lenses of psychology, sociology, and data analysis. In addition to studying the foundations of the criminal justice system, students analyze systemic issues such as addiction, race, gender, and violence to understand the social and economic roots of crime and identify ethical approaches to addressing them.

Taught by experts in the field of criminal justice—including attorneys, police chiefs, academics, and practitioners—the program combines in-depth study of criminal law and criminology with electives on social change, psychology, and sociology. Boston College’s Jesuit tradition of inquiry and service prepares graduates to help build an ethical, rehabilitative criminal justice system.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADCJ1100 Introduction to Social Justice
  • ADCJ1101 Principles of Criminal Justice
  • ADPS1100 Introduction to Psychology
  • ADSO1001 Introduction to Sociology
  • ADCJ2000 Criminology
  • ADCJ2101 Corrections: Policies and Practices
  • ADCJ3010 Criminal Law and Procedure
  • ADCJ3051 American Institutions
  • Select 2 courses from Social and Systemic Challenges in Criminal Justice elective courses
  • Select 2 courses from Interdisciplinary elective courses
     

ADPS1100 and ADSO1001 can fulfill the social science Core requirements.

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • Appraise the power dynamics of policy, social norms, and biases in determining how criminal laws are made and enforced.
  • Apply established and emerging psychological and sociological theories to explain criminal behavior. 
  • Identify and propose interdisciplinary approaches to resolve critical criminal and social justice issues, recognizing that these issues are both evolving and contested, as demonstrated in real-life case studies.
  • Employ oral and written communication to effectively interact within a variety of audiences and contexts. 
  • Articulate the competing ethical issues surrounding criminality and punishment and advocate for a course of action informed by ethical principles that serve the common good.
  • Explain the roles of the key components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.
  • Integrate historic social, cultural, legal, economic, and political events into a coherent explanation of the current state of American institutions.
  • Distinguish the constitutional protections of people who are suspected to have committed a crime, those who are accused of having committed a crime, and those who are convicted.
  • Explain how legislation and judicial decisions affect criminal justice policies and practices.
  • Apply criminal and constitutional law to specific facts employing legal reasoning skills.

B.A., Cybersecurity

The B.A. in Cybersecurity prepares students to succeed in the ever-changing cyber ecosystem.

This program emphasizes risk management, risk tolerance, and risk mitigation as well as the implementation of security controls and compliance with regulatory requirements necessary to achieve the level of risk tolerance acceptable to a particular organization.

The cybersecurity program provides a robust baseline of skills needed to adapt to changes in business, technology, and threat environments. The degree program introduces advanced topics within cybersecurity including ethical hacking, incident response and disaster recovery, security within the software development framework, and the legal and regulatory aspects of cybersecurity.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADIT Cybersecurity Fundamentals
  • ADIT3010 Technical Writing
  • ADIT2000 Computer Security
  • Programming Elective (Choose One)
    • ADIT1990 C++ Programming
    • ADIT1985 Python Programming
  • ADIT Computer Networks
  • ADIT Systems Analysis and Design
  • ADIT Ethical Hacking
  • ADIT Laws, Frameworks, and Policies in Cybersecurity
  • ADIT Incident Response and Disaster Recovery
  • ADIT DevOps Automation and Cloud Security
     

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:

  • Discuss articulately and efficiently with large groups of diverse stakeholders, both technical and non-technical, to effectively demonstrate and communicate security concepts and the value of a modern cybersecurity program.
  • Detect, analyze, identify, prioritize, and resolve security vulnerabilities, threats, risks, and breaches using appropriate tools.
  • Develop cybersecurity programs, policies, and procedures to manage enterprise security risks.
  • Apply security principles and practices to maintain operations in the presence of risks and threats.
  • Demonstrate foundational knowledge of risk management strategies, including calculation of risk, evaluating risk tolerance, compensating controls, and risk management planning.
  • Evaluate and communicate the human role in security systems with an emphasis on ethics, social engineering vulnerabilities, and training.
  • Recognize professional responsibilities and make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles.
  • Discuss relevant laws, regulations, and frameworks as they apply to cybersecurity operations.
  • Describe professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities related to computing and cybersecurity.
  • Upon additional review, the ability to achieve the following industry certifications: Cisco—CCNA, CompTIA—Network+, CompTIA—Security+, CompTIA—CySA+, EC-Council Ethical Hacking, ISACA—CRISC, ISACA—CISA, ISACA—CISM, (ISC)²—CCSP, (ISC)²—SSCP, (ISC)²—CISSP, ITIL Foundations.

B.A., Economics

Want to understand how consumers and businesses alike behave? For students aspiring to master the theory and practical skills central to our market-driven world, our program provides a 360-degree understanding of economic dynamics in modern societies.

Students aiming to become bankers, business managers, market researchers, budget analysts, or others working in careers where they need to know the intricacies of economies will be well-suited for success with this degree. Students learn to differentiate between market structures and analyze case studies using theories of economic growth, unemployment, and inflation.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADEC1101 Principles of Economics
  • ADMT2530 Statistics
  • ADMT1100 Calculus 1 (prereq for ADEC3201/3202)
  • ADEC3202 Macroeconomic Theory
  • ADEC3201 Microeconomic Theory
  • ADEC3515 or ADEC5310 Econometrics or Data Analysis
  • Upper-level Economics electives: Select five courses.
     

ADEC1101 and ADMT1100 will fulfill the Core social science and Core quantitative reasoning requirements respectively.

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able at the end of the program to:

  • Bring theories of economic growth, unemployment, and inflation to bear on the analysis of particular case studies.
  • Characterize and distinguish between different market structures.
  • Relate models of consumer and firm behavior to particular case studies.
  • Bring different macroeconomic models to bear on the analysis of the national economy.
  • Communicate effectively, orally and in writing.
  • Evaluate economic policies and decision making with an ethical lens.

B.A., Information Systems

Organizations today need information technology expertise. Students pursuing this degree prepare to fill that role by working their way from simple computer applications toward advanced software and hardware development.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADIT1340 Introduction to Web Development
  • ADIT1350 JavaScript
  • ADIT1985 Python (students may substitute this course for another programming language)
  • ADIT2000 Computer Security
  • ADIT3308 Project Management
  • ADIT4058 Systems Architecture
  • 4 Information Systems Electives
     

Learning Outcomes

  • At the end of the program, students will be able to program simple computer applications.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to employ software and technology related to computer security.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to communicate effectively, orally and in writing.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to bring ethical principles to bear on the issue of the role of technology in human life.

B.A., Natural Sciences

Do you want to understand how the world around you works? Start by acquiring a comprehensive foundation in the three main branches of natural scientific inquiry: biology, chemistry, and physics. This program provides both breadth and depth.

You’ll begin by taking introductory courses in all three areas and then pursue more advanced courses within the area that most interests you.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • BIOL2010 Ecology and Evolution
  • BIOL2000 and BIOL2110 Molecules and Cells with Lab
  • CHEM1109 and CHEM1111 General Chem I with Lab
  • CHEM1110 and CHEM1112 General Chem II with Lab
  • PHYS2110 or 2100 and PHYS2050 Intro Physics I and Lab
  • PHYS2101 or 2111 and PHYS2051 Intro Physics II and Lab
  • 3 electives within one field of study
     

Learning Outcomes

  • At the end of the program, students will be able to apply foundational knowledge in biology, chemistry, and physics.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to communicate effectively, orally and in writing.
  • At the end of the program, students will have the capacity to engage in meaningful, constructive exchanges with others.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to design scientific research projects that respect the ethical boundaries involved in the study of living organisms.
  • At the end of the program, students will be able to identify the ethical issues surrounding the use of natural resources.

B.A., Psychology

Do you wonder why we do what we do and what makes us tick? Seek the answers through this flexible program, which covers aspects of many applied areas in psychology. Whether you enroll full- or part-time, you'll study with leading practitioners and industry experts as you learn to apply key theories from the field of psychology to solve real-world issues at work, in your community, and in society. Courses are offered weekends, nights, online, and in a hybrid format.

This major is ideal for students who want to analyze human behavior through the lenses of developmental history, social sciences, cognitive psychology, and civil society. You’ll also learn the theory and practice of psychological counseling and apply foundational principles of developmental and cognitive psychology to case studies while considering the field’s ethical dimensions.

Core Curriculum

A distinguishing characteristic of liberal arts education is a required Core curriculum. The Bachelor of Arts programs require the following Core courses:

  • The Examined Life
  • Woods College Formative Seminar
  • 2 English courses:
    • College Writing
    • Literary Works or other Core literature course
  • 2 Philosophy courses (one of which should be an Ethics course)
  • 2 Theology courses
  • 2 Social Science courses
  • 2 History courses (1 must be non-Western)
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning course
  • 1 Natural Science course
  • 1 Arts course
  • 1 Engaging Diverse Perspectives Course
  • The Purposeful Life
  • Designing Your Career
     

Major Requirements

Requirements for Major:

  • ADMT1805 Applied Statistics
  • ADPS1100 Introduction to Psychology
  • ADPS1153 Research Methods for the Social Sciences
  • ADPS1261 Developmental Psychology
  • ADPS2272 Cognitive Psychology
  • ADPS4001 Psychology in Context
  • 6 Psychology Electives
     

Electives

Students are required to complete six elective courses in psychology. To assist students in selecting the best electives for their academic goals, we have developed three areas that reflect possible career paths or areas of interest for which the particular course might be helpful. Some courses will fit into multiple areas. Students do not need to take all of their electives within a single area, and the areas will not be reflected on the student’s transcript or diploma. These are simply to guide students in selecting electives and to provide a better understanding of how the B.A. in Psychology might be put to use.

Community Psychology (CP)

Courses within Community Psychology (CP) bring together many different lenses through which to understand the human being in context. Courses may explore concepts of social justice, social empowerment, and inequality, encouraging students to understand the roles of power and privilege and their impacts on various populations in an effort to conceptualize effective leadership and active citizenship. Students will apply theories of psychology to societal systems and institutions with an aim of developing effective approaches to fostering collaborative relationships and advocating for more just civil structures.

Community Psychology is a broad field with many areas of application including education, public policy, community resources and organizations, and research.

CP Career Paths
  • Education Programming
  • Special Education Paraprofessional
  • Policy Planning, Creation, and Implementation
  • Community Resource Creation
  • Community Health Worker Coordinator
  • Conciliation Specialist
  • ABA Therapist
  • Health Data Specialist
     

Health/Human Services Psychology (HP)

Courses within Health/Human Services (HP) explore areas of psychology related to physical and mental health. It seeks to give students a deeper understanding of how to apply psychological theories to meet the diverse needs of society and develop trusting relationships with individuals they aim to support. Many of the courses in this area equip students to pursue entry-level positions in the field of healthcare advising, community health promotion and outreach, as well as research and data collection.

Health/Human Services is wide-reaching, including the fields of mental health treatment and advisement, data collection, research, and many areas within physical healthcare.

HP Career Paths
  • Research Assistant
  • Mental Health Associate
  • Mental Health Technician
  • Health Data Specialist
  • Health and Community Interventionist
  • Health Promotion Specialist
  • Health Educator
  • Outreach Worker
  • ACCS Outreach Worker
     

Industrial-Organizational Psychology (IO)

Courses within Industrial and Organizational Psychology (IO) investigates the role of psychology in efficient, effective, and equitable systems and organizations. These courses explore a range of institutions, the psychological processes within each, as well as the individual’s place within these group/organizational dynamics. Students will also discuss the psychology behind individual differences and productive, enriching interpersonal relationships.

Industrial and Organizational Psychology involves the application of psychological principles and themes to the field of business, consulting, and human resources.

IO Career Paths
  • Product Analyst
  • Employee Experience Specialist
  • Talent Management Consulting
  • Strategic/Brand Planner
     

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • Interpret and evaluate psychological phenomena by engaging in scientific reasoning and dynamic problem solving in broad, multi-disciplinary contexts
  • Identify and evaluate trustworthy scholarly resources; articulate ways in which context shapes research questions and findings; and interpret basic statistical analyses found within those resources.
  • Evaluate and apply the ethical standards of the psychology field in their professional and personal lives.
  • Propose solutions to civic, social, and global problems through the creative application of psychological theories and constructs while recognizing society’s inherent diversity and the ways in which that diversity impacts those psychological theories and constructs.
  • Create effective communication materials in written, oral, and digital formats, including the correct implementation of the APA style.

Fifth Year and Advanced Standing Programs for Boston College Students

Accelerated Program for Boston College Undergraduate Economics Students (Enrolled at the Woods College, Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, or Carroll School of Management)

Woods College of Advancing Studies is proud to offer Boston College students an option for accelerated completion of the Master of Science in Applied Economics program. This option is available to students with significant previous economics course work, including Economics majors and minors in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences as well as to students with Economics concentration in the Carroll School of Management. Students enrolled in the accelerated program will have to complete eight courses in WCAS, which is possible to achieve within one calendar year of entry into the program.

Benefits

  • Waiver of application fee
  • Waiver of Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
  • Preferred admission without the competition of the rest of the applicant pool
  • Credit for Microeconomic Theory (ECON2201 or ECON2203) and Macroeconomic Theory (ECON2202 or ECON2204) courses if the courses are completed with a grade of B or better. These credits will count as fulfilling the requirement of taking Applied Microeconomic Theory (ADEC7201) and Applied Macroeconomic Theory (ADEC7200).
  • Option to complete the eight remaining course requirements in one additional calendar year
     

Qualifications

  • Anticipated successful completion of a bachelor’s degree in May of senior year
  • Overall GPA of 3.30 or above
  • Grade of B or better in prerequisite courses: Principles of Economics, Statistics, Calculus I, and Calculus II*
  • Submission of all Applied Economics application materials by the end of the semester in which the student will graduate. In order to receive priority consideration for WCAS financial aid, students should apply in the fall semester of their senior year.
     

*Calculus II course can be taken after the admission into the program.

Accelerated Program for Boston College Undergraduate Students (enrolled at the Woods College, Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, or Carroll School of Management)

Woods College of Advancing Studies is proud to offer Boston College students an option for accelerated completion of the Master of Science in Leadership and Administration program. Students enrolled in the accelerated program will have to complete eight courses in WCAS, which is possible to achieve within one calendar year of entry into the program.

Under the terms of this agreement, qualified students are eligible for:

  • Waiver of the application fee;
  • Waiver of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE);
  • Preferred admission without the competition of the rest of the applicant pool;
  • Advanced standing for up to two upper-level courses that student has completed at BC; Graduate Program Director to approve.
  • Option to complete the eight remaining course requirements in one additional calendar year.
     

Qualifications

  • Anticipated successful completion of a bachelor's degree from BC in May of senior year
  • Overall GPA of 3.30 or above
  • Submission of all the application materials by the published Boston College deadline.
     

Interested students should contact the Program Director of the Masters in Leadership and Administration at Woods College with any further questions.

Academic Honors

Degree with Honors

For information regarding academic honors printed in the Commencement program, visit the Policies and Procedures: Undergraduate Academic Regulations, Degree with Honors section of the catalog.

Undergraduate Graduation Awards

Awards at commencement recognize a distinguished scholastic record, special accomplishments in various academic fields, and qualities of outstanding character, leadership, and demonstrated loyalty to the college.

Dean's List

The Woods College Dean's List recognizes the achievement of undergraduate students semester by semester. Students with a GPA of 3.700 or above in the B.A. programs will be placed on the Dean's List. In order to be eligible for the Dean's List, students must earn at least 8 or more credits in courses evaluated with a letter grade. Students must not have withdrawals, pass/fail grades, or incompletes in the semester in question.

Professional Studies Certificates

The Professional Studies Certificate is an end in itself for some students. For others, it may be applied toward completion of a bachelor’s degree. Whatever one’s ultimate goal, whether to qualify for promotion, initiate a career change, or earn an undergraduate degree, a Professional Studies Certificate can help to achieve that objective.

Professional Studies Certificates may be obtained in Cybersecurity, Entrepreneurship, and Sustainability.

Certificate requirements include the following:

  • Students must receive at least a grade of C for each course credited toward the certificate.
  • Certificate requirements should be completed within two years of initial enrollment for non-degree students, and prior to degree completion for students already enrolled in a degree program; courses are permanently retained on the student record.
     

A request to apply to a certificate program must be made to the James A. Woods, S.J. College of Advancing Studies. A request must also be made to receive a formal certificate upon completion.

Cybersecurity Certificate

This Cybersecurity Certificate emphasizes risk management, tolerance and mitigation by implementing security controls and compliance with regulatory requirements that achieve a level of risk tolerance acceptable to the organization.

The Cybersecurity certificate program lays the foundation for security professionals to achieve success providing a robust baseline of skills needed to adapt to changes in business, technology, and threat environments.

Curriculum

Core Courses

Complete the following courses:

  • ADIT Cybersecurity Fundamentals
  • ADIT2000 Computer Security
  • ADIT3010 Technical Writing
  • ADIT Computer Networks
  • ADIT Systems Analysis and Design
     
Electives (complete 1 of the following):
  • ADIT1985 Python Programming
  • ADIT1990 C++ Programming
     

Entrepreneurship Certificate

With a customizable five-course curriculum that blends online and in-person classes, the Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Certificate prepares students to launch or contribute to new ventures that answer market demand and foster sustainable social change. Grounded in Boston College’s tradition of ethics-driven business education and a focus on long-term professional community and support, the certificate is designed for individuals of all backgrounds who want to apply an entrepreneurial mindset to diverse business challenges at startups, nonprofits, and organizations of all kinds.

Curriculum

Core Courses

Complete the following course:

  • ADBM2650 Entrepreneurship
     
Electives (complete 4 of the following):
  • ADSY4001 Strategic Leadership
  • ADMK2201 Digital Marketing Strategy
  • ADBM2103 Digital Commerce
  • ADET3101 Business Planning for New Ventures
  • ADET3102 Design and Prototyping for Entrepreneurs
  • ADET3103 Funding for New Ventures
  • ADET3104 Social Entrepreneurship
     

Sustainability Certificate

With a six-course curriculum offered entirely online, this program comprises courses such as Sustainability Science, Planetary Health, Wetlands Science and Policy, Sustainable Design as a Way of Thinking, and Food and Sustainability. Students are exposed to both science and policy as they explore such pressing concerns as climate change, population growth, and the limits of natural resources.

Curriculum

Core Courses

Complete the following course:

  • ADBI1128 Sustainability Science
     
Electives

Complete 5 of the following courses:

  • ADBI1140 Citizen Science
  • ADBI2010 Eating and the Environment
  • ADBI3010 Energy in the Twenty-First Century
  • ADGE2500 Natural Disasters
  • ADGE2505 Wetlands Science and Policy
  • ADSB1904 Planetary Health
  • ADSB2026 Sustainable Design as a Way of Thinking
  • ADSB2105 Food and Sustainability

Non-Degree and Visiting Students

Non-Degree Students

Non-degree students are individuals interested in taking undergraduate courses for academic credit but not in applying for a degree. Non-degree students may enroll in fall, spring, or summer semesters. A brief non-degree application form must be completed and submitted online.

Most Woods undergraduate courses are open to non-degree students (with certain exceptions for courses in specific degree or certificate programs). Non-degree students are limited to two courses per semester. If you would like to take more courses in a semester, you will be required to apply to a degree or certificate program or submit a petition to the academic and advising team to waive this policy.

There are many different reasons students pursue non-degree coursework, and we recommend that you consult with our non-degree academic advisor before registering for courses.

As a non-degree student, you are not eligible for need-based or merit-based financial aid from Boston College or for most federally and state-funded assistance plans. (See specific assistance programs for exceptions.) However, your non-degree work may qualify for reimbursement under employer-sponsored tuition remission development programs. We’re happy to work with you and your employer to see if our non-degree offerings qualify for assistance. Contact a member of our academic advising team for more information.

Visiting Students

Individuals wishing to attend during the day as special undergraduate students are required to apply for non-degree status at the James A. Woods, S.J., College of Advancing Studies. Qualified applicants are admitted to specific courses on an individual basis.

More specific application instructions for those interested in applying for Visiting Student status can be found at the Visiting Students web page.