Founded 1969, and expanding into the Department of Eastern, Slavic, and German Studies, ESGS has been one of the oldest academic departments and the most unique of its kind in New England. As a community of scholars and students, ESGS is dedicated to the study of the Humanities—in fields spanning Linguistics, East Asian and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Slavic and Eastern European Studies, and German Studies—reflecting on topics and studying languages that have special currency in our history, and for our times. With modern challenges on the rise, and with pressing questions dealing with societies in conflict, globalization, and migration becoming more pressing, the study of the Humanities is becoming all the more relevant, indeed crucial to addressing and making sense of growing global complexities. To this end, the Department of Eastern, Slavic, and German Studies brings forth intense curricular and disciplinary diversity, a unique dynamic academic ecosystem of sorts, that is reflected in the variety of the department’s undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Linguistics, Russian, East European Studies, Slavic Studies, German Studies, and an array of undergraduate departmental and inter-disciplinary minors in Linguistics, Russian, East European Studies, German, and East Asian and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

News

The Michael B. Kreps Memorial Readings in Russian Émigré Literature
Крепсовские чтения

Michael B. Kreps

The Michael B. Kreps Memorial Readings (Крепсовские Чтения) were inaugurated at Boston College in the Fall of 1997 and named so after the late Professor Michael B. Kreps (Михаил Крепс), a Russian poet in his own right, who was a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at Boston College from 1981 until his death in 1994.

The Michael B. Kreps Memorial Readings (Крепсовские Чтения) feature contemporary Russian émigré writers from around the world. Professor Maxim D. Shrayer (Boston College) serves as the curator and moderator of the series. All readings are in Russian and are free and open to the public.

Learn More