Events

2021-2022 Events

Migration, Social Responsibility and Moral Imagination

Migration, Social Responsibility and Moral Imagination

February 10

12:00 PM

McElroy Commons, 237

With Kristin Heyer, Professor of Theology, Boston College

and Dan Kanstroom, Professor of Law, Boston College and co-director of the CHRIJ

Heyer will present her chapter in the event title, and then along with Kanstroom on their jointly authored book chapter, "Empathy, Legitimacy, Faith, and the Dangerously Uncertain Future of Migration" from Heyer's co-edited volume Christianity and the Law of Migration. 

Heyer chapter description:

Drawing on traditions of biblical hospitality, social doctrine, and human rights, literature in Christian migration ethics typically focuses on the plight and agency of migrants and the relative duties of reception within a global framework. Given the tendency for secular policy discourse to address immigration issues primarily in terms of the discrete actions of migrants, making individuals the primary target for enforcement, relational emphases in Christian ethics can help reorient analyses to consider the roles historical relationships and transnational actors play in abetting migration. The relational elements of Christian ethics—social anthropology, the universal destination of created goods, social sin, structural justice—help illuminate complex causes of migration and shared accountability. In particular, such resources bring into relief the relationship between destructive ideologies and structures of injustice that deny relationality and bring harm to migrants and receiving communities alike. Portraying immigration through a lens of individual culpability alone obscures these multileveled, subtle dynamics at play. Given nonvoluntary dimensions of social sin, Christian migration ethics must also address the more diffuse and complex structures and ideologies that abet complicity in injustice and apathy.


Currently planned to be a hybrid event with in person and online options. A boxed lunch to be served at the conclusion of the event.

Register for either in person or online: tinyurl.com/Heyer0210RSVP 

Contact
Timothy Karcz

Book presentation: "Central America's Forgotten History: Revolution, Violence, and the Roots of Migration"

Book presentation: "Central America's Forgotten History: Revolution, Violence, and the Roots of Migration"

March 17

12:00 PM

McElroy Commons, 237

With author Avi Chomsky, Professor of Professor of History, Salem State University.

Chomsky will present from her recent book, Central America's Forgotten History: Revolution, Violence, and the Roots of Migration

Book description: 

At the center of the current immigration debate are migrants from Central America fleeing poverty, corruption, and violence in search of refuge in the United States. In Central America’s Forgotten History, Aviva Chomsky answers the urgent question “How did we get here?” Centering the centuries-long intertwined histories of US expansion and Indigenous and Central American struggles against inequality and oppression, Chomsky highlights the pernicious cycle of colonial and neocolonial development policies that promote cultures of violence and forgetting without any accountability or restorative reparations.

Focusing on the valiant struggles for social and economic justice in Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras, Chomsky restores these vivid and gripping events to popular consciousness. Tracing the roots of displacement and migration in Central America to the Spanish conquest and bringing us to the present day, she concludes that the more immediate roots of migration from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras lie in the wars and in the US interventions of the 1980s and the peace accords of the 1990s that set the stage for neoliberalism in Central America.

Chomsky also examines how and why histories and memories are suppressed, and the impact of losing historical memory. Only by erasing history can we claim that Central American countries created their own poverty and violence, while the United States’ enjoyment and profit from their bananas, coffee, mining, clothing, and export of arms are simply unrelated curiosities.

 

Currently planned to be a hybrid event with in person and online options. A boxed lunch to be served at the conclusion of the event.

RSVP for in person or online (Zoom) option at tinyurl.com/chomsky0317

Contact
Timothy Karcz

Sanctuary on Wheels: Wayward Care in The City of the Deported

Sanctuary on Wheels: Wayward Care in The City of the Deported

April 21

12:00 PM

Campion Hall, 139

With Barbara Sostaita, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Mahindra Center, Harvard University.

Most sanctuary efforts in the United States focus on preventing and sheltering migrants from deportation. Based on research in Nogales, Sonora -- notoriously known as "the city of the deported"-- this talk charts sanctuary in the wake of deportation. We will travel with Panchito Olachea, a deported nurse who repurposed a church van as an ambulance and treats migrants ineligible for medical care in the border town, to consider how sanctuary travels across and disrupts national borders. 

About the speaker:

Barbara Sostaita is a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, where she is editing a manuscript titled Sanctuary Everywhere: Fugitive Care on the Migrant Trail. Focused on the Sonora-Arizona borderlands, she documents moments of care and intimacy that expose the impermanence and instability of border militarization.

 

Currently planned as a hybrid event with in person and online aptions. A boxed lunch will be served to registered attendees at the conclusion of the event.  

Register for either the in person or online Zoom option at: tinyurl.com/SostaitaRSVP 

Contact
Timothy Karcz