2018-19 Events

DACAmented and Undocumented Students in Higher Education: Working Toward Inclusion

DACAmented and Undocumented Students in Higher Education: Working Toward Inclusion

With Raquel Muñiz Castro, Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership & Higher Education, BC Lynch School of Education and Human Development; and Liaison to the BC Law School.

DACAmented and undocumented students are among the most vulnerable populations in higher education today, and their circumstances grow more precarious as the Trump administration threatens policies that provide them with temporary opportunity and protection. Faculty members and higher education practitioners can provide instrumental support for these populations that have been historically excluded from participation in higher education. This session will include an introduction to DACA, followed by a discussion of what the literature reveals to be the challenges experienced by DACAmented and undocumented students within and outside the classroom in higher education.  After that, attendees will be introduced to best practices and recommendations from the literature, and explore how we can improve the experiences of DACAmented and undocumented students at Boston College and within our spheres of influence.

A light lunch to be served. RSVP at https://tinyurl.com/BC4DACA

March 29

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Campion Hall, 139

Contact
Timothy Karcz

Rights & Resources in Refugee Camps

Rights & Resources in Refugee Camps

The Center is hosting this informational event based on the Jesuit Refugee Service's refugee camp simulation module, "Walk a Mile in My Shoes."

There will be a number of stations representing access, and limitations, to basic human needs in camps, information about the scope of the forcible displacement phenomenon around the world, the US context, local groups representing refugees resettled in the greater Boston area, and opportunities for advocacy. The intent is to provide some basic background on this issue affecting tens of millions of people worldwide.

The simulation takes about 20 minutes to complete, so participants can stop by anytime between 6:00PM and 7:40PM to get started.

Thanks to all the organizations and BC student groups helping to make this event possible, including:

  • Charity: water
  • GlobeMed at Boston College
  • BC Model UN
  • Social Workers for Social Justice (through the School of Social Work)
  • BC Real Food

Registration not necessary, but appreciated at the Register button or at tinyurl.com/April1refugee!

April 01

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Corcoran Commons, Heights Room

Contact
Timothy Karcz

BC Law student debrief: A report back from an asylum and refugee workshop in Honduras

BC Law student debrief: A report back from an asylum and refugee workshop in Honduras

US border authorities detained nearly twice as many migrants — 268,044 — in the first five months of this fiscal year that started in October than were detained in the same period the previous year at the US southern border.  Why another surge of people trying to seek asylum in the US, and how is the asylum-seeking process is currently working at our southern border?

BC Law students Julia Novak and Audrey Cleaver-Bartholomew will report back from a trip to Honduras in March, where they participated in a workshop on migration issues in the country,  As part of the trip, they presented to help educate locals there on legal issues related to asylum seeking in the US, and Novak and Cleaver-Bartholomew also learned more about the root causes (such as violence, poverty and human rights violations) driving migration out of the country as part of this initiative organized by the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States.

Join us for this presentation that will help enlighten us as to the causes of migration from Central America, as well as understand how the US is responding with its policies.

A light lunch will be served.  RSVP here for lunch or at http://tinyurl.com/HondurasMigration.

April 04

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

East Wing, 120

Contact
Timothy Karcz

"Rights in Conflict" presentation: Syrian and Afghan refugees in Turkey: gender-sensitive resilience interventions and challenges to local integration

"Rights in Conflict" presentation: Syrian and Afghan refugees in Turkey: gender-sensitive resilience interventions and challenges to local integration

With Dr. Özgür Erdur-Baker, Professor of the Psychological Counseling and Guidance working at Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.

 

Turkey is now host to more than 3.5 million Syrian refugees in addition to its already existing refugee population.  Fulbright Visiting Scholar and psychologist Özgür Erdur-Baker will explore both the needs of refugees and of locals, that is, those receiving them. Findings from ongoing research include refugees’ everyday experiences and their evolution over time. The concept of resilience will be critically evaluated with respect to gender differences as the data reveals that “what is good for refugee women” may not be “good for refugee men.” Specifically, while refugee women often flourish in public settings, they also often struggle at home.  Erdur-Baker will also discuss the needs and struggles of locals who all of the sudden found themselves hosting about 3.5 million refugees given Turkey’s open door policies. The transforming nature of discriminatory attitudes in society and the issues of refugee receiving schools will be discussed. 

__________________________________________________________________________________

Özgür Erdur-Baker is a Professor of the Psychological Counseling and Guidance working at Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degree in Counseling Psychology from University of Texas at Austin, USA. She has extensive teaching and research background in the disciplines of developmental, educational and counseling psychology. She is an author of numerous national and international journal articles, book chapters and conference proceedings. Her main research interests are trauma/disaster psychology, gender and cultural issues in counseling, and school violence including cyber and traditional bullying. impacts of information and communication technologies on children and adolescents. 

A light lunch will be served.  RSVP for lunch at tinyurl.com/RefugeesTurkey

Co-sponsored by the Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology program in the BC Lynch School of Education and Human Development.

April 08

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Campion Hall, 139

Contact
Timothy Karcz

The April Rebellion in Nicaragua: Origins, Protagonists, and Effects

The April Rebellion in Nicaragua: Origins, Protagonists, and Effects

With Dr. José Luis Rocha.

Marx understood revolution as a “tiger’s leap into the past.” In April’s turmoil, the Nicaraguan tiger, its insurrectionist youth, grounded itself in the past to leap toward a future that must not repeat the present. How did the unimaginable become reality? April 2018 would have been impossible without social media. Nicaragua’s leaping tiger is wholly a creature of the Information Age and an unusual political conception of how to change a corrupt regime. Rocha will explore these dynamics in his presentation to be followed by conversation with attendees.

____________________________________________________________________________

José Luis Rocha is a researcher at Envío, journal of the Central American University (UCA) in Managua, Nicaragua and associate Researcher with the Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester. 

He holds a PhD in Sociology from the Philipps-Universiät Marburg, Germany. His work focuses on issues relating to youth gangs, social movements, political analysis, and migration. He is a member of the editorial committees of the academic journals Envío and Encuentro (Nicaragua) and Anuario de Estudios Centroamericanos (Costa Rica) and was also the Research Coordinator of the Central American Jesuit Service for Migrants in Central America and Director of that organization in Nicaragua from 2004 to 2012. Some of his recent publications include the books Autoconvocados y conectados. Los universitarios en la revuelta de abril en Nicaragua (2019); La desobediencia de las masas. La migración no autorizada de centroamericanos a Estados Unidos como desobediencia civil (2018); Expulsados de la globalización(2011); and the bilingual Spanish/English book Central Americans Redefining the borders (Envío, 2008), and A Region Torn Apart: The Dynamics of Migration in Central America (San José: Lara Segura, 2006).

Rocha recently co-authored an article on the rebellion and the repression which fueld it in a recent article.

A light lunch will be served.  RSVP for lunch at tinyurl.com/BCRocha or at the red Register button at the right of the event listing.

April 10

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Stokes Hall, N203

Contact
Timothy Karcz

Book talk: “Beyond Repair? Mayan Women’s Protagonism in the Aftermath of Genocidal Harm”

Book talk: “Beyond Repair? Mayan Women’s Protagonism in the Aftermath of Genocidal Harm”

With authors M. Brinton Lykes, Center Co-director and Professor of Community-Cultural Psychology, BC Lynch School of Education and Human Development; and Alison Crosby, Associate Professor, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies, and Director, Centre for Feminist Research, York University (Canada).

Moderator: Katie Young, Professor of Law, BC Law School

Respondents: Maria Elena Torre, Director and co-founder of The Public Science Project, CUNY and Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj, Craig M. Cogut Visiting Professor of Latin American Studies, Brown University.

"Beyond Repair?" explores Mayan women’s agency in the search for redress for harm suffered during the genocidal violence perpetrated by the Guatemalan state in the early 1980s at the height of the thirty-six-year armed conflict. The book draws on research conducted with fifty-four Q’eqchi’, Kaqchikel, Chuj, and Mam women who are seeking truth, justice, and reparation for the violence they experienced during the war, and the women’s rights activists, lawyers, psychologists, Mayan rights activists, and researchers who have accompanied them as intermediaries for over a decade. Alison Crosby and M. Brinton Lykes argue that at different moments Mayan women have been actively engaged as protagonists in constructivist and discursive performances through which they have narrated new, mobile meanings of “Mayan woman,” repositioning themselves at the interstices of multiple communities and in their pursuit of redress for harm suffered.

Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event.  A reception will follow.

RSVP at this link or at the red "Register" button to the right of the event listing.

April 25

4:30 PM

Campion Hall, 139

Contact
Timothy Karcz

"Hitler's Mein Kampf: Prelude to the Holocaust"

"Hitler's Mein Kampf: Prelude to the Holocaust"

In 2016, the historians in Munich's Institute of Contemporary History published an annotated 2-volume edition of Hitler's blueprint for the new Germany, "Mein Kampf" ("My Struggle," 1926). This international conference will host speakers from Germany, Israel and the US and will present their scholarly work to show how Hitler's original writing in "Mein Kampf" on nationalism, expansionism and anti-Semitism led to the tragedy of WWII and the Holocaust.

April 25 – April 26

7:00 PM – 9:30 PM

Corcoran Commons, The Heights Room

Contact
John Michalczyk (john.michalczyk@bc.edu)

"Hitler's Mein Kampf: Prelude to the Holocaust"

"Hitler's Mein Kampf: Prelude to the Holocaust"

In 2016, the historians in Munich's Institute of Contemporary History published an annotated 2-volume edition of Hitler's blueprint for the new Germany, "Mein Kampf" ("My Struggle," 1926). This international conference will host speakers from Germany, Israel and the US and will present their scholarly work to show how Hitler's original writing in "Mein Kampf" on nationalism, expansionism and anti-Semitism led to the tragedy of WWII and the Holocaust.

April 25 – April 26

9:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Corcoran Commons, The Heights Room

Contact
John Michalczyk (john.michalczyk@bc.edu)

"Rights in Conflict" Luncheon Speaker series

The focus of this year’s Human Rights Luncheon Speaker series is “Rights in Conflict.”  By this framing, we aim to focus on two distinct but related ideas:  The first is that rights discourses, by their very nature, often conflict with each other.  This raises deep problems of interpretation, legitimacy, strategies and tactics for activists, etc.  Around the world, we see many recent poignant examples of such conflicts, including US Supreme Court litigation over religious-based refusals to provide cakes for gay weddings, debates over the lines where “free speech” may become sufficiently oppressive to violate rights to dignity or equal protection, tensions between the power (some say the “rights”) of nation-states to control their borders versus compelling human rights claims of refugees, those facing deportation, women’s rights claims for equity versus “traditional” or “cultural” but often exclusionary or patriarchal norms, etc.

The other meaning of conflict refers to actual conflicts where rights claims face increasing pressure, again often due to claims of overriding security issues (e.g., President Trump’s promise to resurrect waterboarding; the threats to journalists in Mexico, and elsewhere), deep norms of cultural or religious cohesion (e.g., the Rohingya in Burma; US and Canada removals and forced assimilation of Native children), and transnational capital development (e.g., global North’s industries’ extractive mining and/or flooding of indigenous lands for hydroelectricity in the global South).

In sum, human rights claims have increasingly come into conflict in both senses, both in the US and around the world. Invited speakers will reflect on these fault lines and consider how societies and institutions balance such competing claims, both as to specific case studies and, as part of a year long extended conversation, more broadly.