Concert Calendar

Upcoming Events

Lecture Recital with Sourcework

Lecture Recital with Sourcework

Renaissance sacred music like you've never heard it before ~ sung from the original Renaissance notation.

November 15

1:30 PM

Saint Mary's Hall, Chapel

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

The Theatre of Tadeusz Kantor - Lecture by Michal Kobialka

The Theatre of Tadeusz Kantor - Lecture by Michal Kobialka

Tadeusz Kantor (1915-1990), painter, theatre director, stage designer, actor, writer, and theoretician, was one of the most influential multi-disciplinary artists of the 20th century. His stage works, Gesamtkunstwerke, that synthesize drama, staging, spectacle and music, articulate new conceptions of time and space and of the object; they challenge history caught in the act of archiving the events in absolute space and absolute time by articulating the materiality of memory. As Boston College Scholar-in-Residence, Michal Kobialka, the preeminent and internationally acclaimed authority on Kantor will present a 4-day lecture/screening series fromNovember 15 through November 18 entitled Tadeusz Kantor – A Brief Topography of Representation. In addition to Kobialka’s four presentations, the series also includes screenings of The Dead ClassWielopole,  and Today is my Birthday. The Kantor project will be framed by discussions of Kantor’s machines and objects, the idea of mnemotechnics and historiography, as well as the exploration of late style. Kantor is considered among the most influential theater directors of the past century and yet his work is relatively little known in the United States compared to Europe and the Far East. 

 

Tadeusz Kantor’s work is an example par excellenceof the disintegration of the boundaries between his work as a theatre director, stage designer, and a visual artist.  As he noted in one of his essays, “I am not a director who paints; neither am I a painter who directors.”  His artistic endeavors, the medium notwithstanding, materialize Kantor’s thought regarding visual arts—thus, interdisciplinarity, which animates today’s conviction that humanistic inquiry (work in language culture, art, philosophy, media, and communications, for example) is central to the intellectual project of any liberal arts community.  This series of presentations will focus on Tadeusz Kantor’s understanding of the concept of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history, as developed in Kantor’s theoretical writings and in his productions from The Return of Odysseus (1944) to Today is My Birthday (1990).  The emphasis will be on the different stages in the development of Kantor’s ideas, as marked by his experiments with the so-called Autonomous Theatre (parallel construction of space), Informel (matter), the Zero Theatre (marginalized objects), the Happening (the space and the practices of the everyday life), the Impossible Theatre (the process of rupturing the continuum of a sense of perception), and the Theatre of Death (Room/Inn of Memory, objects and bio-objects).  Equally important, the emphasis will be the tension that exists between Kantor’s understanding of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history embedded for him in the historical conditions of the twentieth century and, for us, in the role of the humanities and fine arts in establishing and changing our critical understanding of those conditions.

 

All lectures and screenings will be held in Devlin 101: 

(1) Thursday, 11/15, 7-9 pm: "Tadeusz Kantor's Objects & Machines"

(2) Friday,11/16, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by a screening of The Dead Class

(3) Saturday, 11/17, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by Wielopole, Wielopole

(4) Sunday, 11/18, 3-6 pm: Presentation followed by Today is My Birthday

 

Michal Kobialka,Professor of Theatre in the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance at the University of Minnesota, has published over 100 articles, essays and reviews and is the author of two books on Tadeusz Kantor’s theatre, A Journey Through Other Spaces: Essays and Manifestos, 1944-1990 and Further on, Nothing: Tadeusz Kantor’s Theatre He has presented papers on medieval, eighteenth-century and contemporary European theatre, as well as theatre historiography at various regional, national, and international conferences. 

November 15

7:00 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101

Contact
Ralf Gawlick; gawlicra@c.edu

Screening  of Dead Class, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Screening of Dead Class, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Tadeusz Kantor (1915-1990), painter, theatre director, stage designer, actor, writer, and theoretician, was one of the most influential multi-disciplinary artists of the 20th century. His stage works, Gesamtkunstwerke, that synthesize drama, staging, spectacle and music, articulate new conceptions of time and space and of the object; they challenge history caught in the act of archiving the events in absolute space and absolute time by articulating the materiality of memory. As Boston College Scholar-in-Residence, Michal Kobialka, the preeminent and internationally acclaimed authority on Kantor will present a 4-day lecture/screening series fromNovember 15 through November 18 entitled Tadeusz Kantor – A Brief Topography of Representation. In addition to Kobialka’s four presentations, the series also includes screenings of The Dead ClassWielopole, and Today is my Birthday. The Kantor project will be framed by discussions of Kantor’s machines and objects, the idea of mnemotechnics and historiography, as well as the exploration of late style. Kantor is considered among the most influential theater directors of the past century and yet his work is relatively little known in the United States compared to Europe and the Far East. 

 

Tadeusz Kantor’s work is an example par excellenceof the disintegration of the boundaries between his work as a theatre director, stage designer, and a visual artist.  As he noted in one of his essays, “I am not a director who paints; neither am I a painter who directors.”  His artistic endeavors, the medium notwithstanding, materialize Kantor’s thought regarding visual arts—thus, interdisciplinarity, which animates today’s conviction that humanistic inquiry (work in language culture, art, philosophy, media, and communications, for example) is central to the intellectual project of any liberal arts community.  This series of presentations will focus on Tadeusz Kantor’s understanding of the concept of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history, as developed in Kantor’s theoretical writings and in his productions from The Return of Odysseus (1944) to Today is My Birthday (1990).  The emphasis will be on the different stages in the development of Kantor’s ideas, as marked by his experiments with the so-called Autonomous Theatre (parallel construction of space), Informel (matter), the Zero Theatre (marginalized objects), the Happening (the space and the practices of the everyday life), the Impossible Theatre (the process of rupturing the continuum of a sense of perception), and the Theatre of Death (Room/Inn of Memory, objects and bio-objects).  Equally important, the emphasis will be the tension that exists between Kantor’s understanding of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history embedded for him in the historical conditions of the twentieth century and, for us, in the role of the humanities and fine arts in establishing and changing our critical understanding of those conditions.

 

All lectures and screenings will be held in Devlin 101: 

(1) Thursday, 11/15, 7-9 pm: "Tadeusz Kantor's Objects & Machines"

(2) Friday,11/16, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by a screening of The Dead Class

(3) Saturday, 11/17, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by Wielopole, Wielopole

(4) Sunday, 11/18, 3-6 pm: Presentation followed by Today is My Birthday

 

Michal KobialkaProfessor of Theatre in the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance at the University of Minnesota, has published over 100 articles, essays and reviews and is the author of two books on Tadeusz Kantor’s theatre, A Journey Through Other Spaces: Essays and Manifestos, 1944-1990 and Further on, Nothing: Tadeusz Kantor’s Theatre He has presented papers on medieval, eighteenth-century and contemporary European theatre, as well as theatre historiography at various regional, national, and international conferences. 

The residency is generously sponsored by the Institute for the Liberal Arts. 

All events are free and open to the public.

November 16

7:00 PM

Boston College, Devlin Hall 101

Contact
Ralf Gawlick; gawlicra@bc.edu

Screening  of Wielopole, Wielopole, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Screening of Wielopole, Wielopole, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Tadeusz Kantor (1915-1990), painter, theatre director, stage designer, actor, writer, and theoretician, was one of the most influential multi-disciplinary artists of the 20th century. His stage works, Gesamtkunstwerke, that synthesize drama, staging, spectacle and music, articulate new conceptions of time and space and of the object; they challenge history caught in the act of archiving the events in absolute space and absolute time by articulating the materiality of memory. As Boston College Scholar-in-Residence, Michal Kobialka, the preeminent and internationally acclaimed authority on Kantor will present a 4-day lecture/screening series fromNovember 15 through November 18 entitled Tadeusz Kantor – A Brief Topography of Representation. In addition to Kobialka’s four presentations, the series also includes screenings of The Dead ClassWielopole,  and Today is my Birthday. The Kantor project will be framed by discussions of Kantor’s machines and objects, the idea of mnemotechnics and historiography, as well as the exploration of late style. Kantor is considered among the most influential theater directors of the past century and yet his work is relatively little known in the United States compared to Europe and the Far East. 

 

Tadeusz Kantor’s work is an example par excellenceof the disintegration of the boundaries between his work as a theatre director, stage designer, and a visual artist.  As he noted in one of his essays, “I am not a director who paints; neither am I a painter who directors.”  His artistic endeavors, the medium notwithstanding, materialize Kantor’s thought regarding visual arts—thus, interdisciplinarity, which animates today’s conviction that humanistic inquiry (work in language culture, art, philosophy, media, and communications, for example) is central to the intellectual project of any liberal arts community.  This series of presentations will focus on Tadeusz Kantor’s understanding of the concept of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history, as developed in Kantor’s theoretical writings and in his productions from The Return of Odysseus (1944) to Today is My Birthday (1990).  The emphasis will be on the different stages in the development of Kantor’s ideas, as marked by his experiments with the so-called Autonomous Theatre (parallel construction of space), Informel (matter), the Zero Theatre (marginalized objects), the Happening (the space and the practices of the everyday life), the Impossible Theatre (the process of rupturing the continuum of a sense of perception), and the Theatre of Death (Room/Inn of Memory, objects and bio-objects).  Equally important, the emphasis will be the tension that exists between Kantor’s understanding of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history embedded for him in the historical conditions of the twentieth century and, for us, in the role of the humanities and fine arts in establishing and changing our critical understanding of those conditions.

 

All lectures and screenings will be held in Devlin 101: 

(1) Thursday, 11/15, 7-9 pm: "Tadeusz Kantor's Objects & Machines"

(2) Friday,11/16, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by a screening of The Dead Class

(3) Saturday, 11/17, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by Wielopole, Wielopole

(4) Sunday, 11/18, 3-6 pm: Presentation followed by Today is My Birthday

 

Michal Kobialka,Professor of Theatre in the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance at the University of Minnesota, has published over 100 articles, essays and reviews and is the author of two books on Tadeusz Kantor’s theatre, A Journey Through Other Spaces: Essays and Manifestos, 1944-1990 and Further on, Nothing: Tadeusz Kantor’s Theatre He has presented papers on medieval, eighteenth-century and contemporary European theatre, as well as theatre historiography at various regional, national, and international conferences. 

The residency is generously sponsored by the Institute for the Liberal Arts. 

All events are free and open to the public.

 

November 17

7:00 PM

Boston College, Devlin Hall 101

Contact
Ralf Gawlick; gawlicra@bc.edu

Screening  of Today is My Birthday, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Screening of Today is My Birthday, T. Kantor; Lecture by M. Kobialka

Tadeusz Kantor (1915-1990), painter, theatre director, stage designer, actor, writer, and theoretician, was one of the most influential multi-disciplinary artists of the 20th century. His stage works, Gesamtkunstwerke, that synthesize drama, staging, spectacle and music, articulate new conceptions of time and space and of the object; they challenge history caught in the act of archiving the events in absolute space and absolute time by articulating the materiality of memory. As Boston College Scholar-in-Residence, Michal Kobialka, the preeminent and internationally acclaimed authority on Kantor will present a 4-day lecture/screening series from November 15 through November 18 entitled Tadeusz Kantor – A Brief Topography of Representation. In addition to Kobialka’s four presentations, the series also includes screenings of The Dead ClassWielopole, and Today is my Birthday. The Kantor project will be framed by discussions of Kantor’s machines and objects, the idea of mnemotechnics and historiography, as well as the exploration of late style. Kantor is considered among the most influential theater directors of the past century and yet his work is relatively little known in the United States compared to Europe and the Far East. 

 

Tadeusz Kantor’s work is an example par excellence of the disintegration of the boundaries between his work as a theatre director, stage designer, and a visual artist.  As he noted in one of his essays, “I am not a director who paints; neither am I a painter who directors.”  His artistic endeavors, the medium notwithstanding, materialize Kantor’s thoughts regarding visual arts—thus, interdisciplinarity, which animates today’s conviction that humanistic inquiry (work in language culture, art, philosophy, media, and communications, for example) is central to the intellectual project of any liberal arts community.  This series of presentations will focus on Tadeusz Kantor’s understanding of the concept of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history, as developed in Kantor’s theoretical writings and in his productions from The Return of Odysseus (1944) to Today is My Birthday (1990).  The emphasis will be on the different stages in the development of Kantor’s ideas, as marked by his experiments with the so-called Autonomous Theatre (parallel construction of space), Informel (matter), the Zero Theatre (marginalized objects), the Happening (the space and the practices of the everyday life), the Impossible Theatre (the process of rupturing the continuum of a sense of perception), and the Theatre of Death (Room/Inn of Memory, objects and bio-objects).  Equally important, the emphasis will be the tension that exists between Kantor’s understanding of interdisciplinarity, space and the object, as well as memory and history embedded for him in the historical conditions of the twentieth century and, for us, in the role of the humanities and fine arts in establishing and changing our critical understanding of those conditions.

 

All lectures and screenings will be held in Devlin 101: 

(1) Thursday, 11/15, 7-9 pm: "Tadeusz Kantor's Objects & Machines"

(2) Friday,11/16, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by a screening of The Dead Class

(3) Saturday, 11/17, 7-10 pm: Presentation followed by Wielopole, Wielopole

(4) Sunday, 11/18, 3-6 pm: Presentation followed by Today is My Birthday

 

Michal Kobialka,Professor of Theatre in the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance at the University of Minnesota, has published over 100 articles, essays and reviews and is the author of two books on Tadeusz Kantor’s theatre, A Journey Through Other Spaces: Essays and Manifestos, 1944-1990 and Further on, Nothing: Tadeusz Kantor’s Theatre He has presented papers on medieval, eighteenth-century and contemporary European theatre, as well as theatre historiography at various regional, national, and international conferences. 

The residency is generously sponsored by the Institute for the Liberal Arts. 

All events are free and open to the public.

 

November 18

3:00 PM

Boston College, Devlin Hall 101

Contact
Ralf Gawlick; gawlicra@bc.edu

Boston College Chamber Music Society, Sandra Hebert, director

Boston College Chamber Music Society, Sandra Hebert, director

Performances by BC students

November 27

8:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Boston College Opera Workshop and Chamber Music, Randy McGee and Sandra Hebert, directors

Boston College Opera Workshop and Chamber Music, Randy McGee and Sandra Hebert, directors

Performances by BC students

November 28

8:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

Annual Christmas Concerts

November 30 – December 01

8:00 PM

Trinity Chapel, Newton Campus

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

Annual Christmas Concerts

November 30 – December 01

8:00 PM

Trinity Chapel, Newton Campus

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

Annual Christmas Concerts

December 02

2:00 PM

Trinity Chapel, Newton Campus

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

ASTAZA - Boston College Middle East Ensemble, Nizar Fares, director

ASTAZA - Boston College Middle East Ensemble, Nizar Fares, director

Annual Fall concert

December 03

8:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Boston College Chamber Music Society, Sandra Hebert, director

Boston College Chamber Music Society, Sandra Hebert, director

Performances by BC students

December 05

8:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Music at St. Mary's Christmas Concert

Music at St. Mary's Christmas Concert

Members of the University Chorale of Boston College, John Finney, conductor

December 06

5:00 PM

St. Mary's Chapel

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Liederabend, Lindsay Albert, director

Liederabend, Lindsay Albert, director

Song recital performed by BC students

December 07

4:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Musical Theatre Cabaret, Pamela Murray, director, Lindsay Albert, pianist

Musical Theatre Cabaret, Pamela Murray, director, Lindsay Albert, pianist

BC students perform selections from musical theatre

December 07

8:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
concerts@bc.edu

Ralf Gawlick, Composer, World Première: Best Regards Bruno ~ Letters from Stalingrad

Ralf Gawlick, Composer, World Première: Best Regards Bruno ~ Letters from Stalingrad

Bradford Gleim, baritone, and Chi-Chen Wu, piano, will première faculty composer Ralf Gawlick's new work. Best regards Bruno - Letters from Stalingrad (Herzliche Grüße Bruno ~ Briefe aus Stalingrad) is an electro-acoustic work conceived from the last two letters written by the composer's young uncle (19), Bruno Gawlick, before being listed as missing in action in late December 1942. The listener moves through time and space via a soundscape that integrates archival sound recordings with live spoken word, two separate piano parts and the prophecy of the sung voice. The resulting work is unique, and in its intimacy and profound reflections, constitutes a fierce anti-war memorial. 

The work is  also associated with a larger commemoration: the 75th anniversary of Stalingrad (August, 1942/February 1943 - August, 2017/February 2018).

 

March 30

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

First Baptist Church in Newton Center

Contact
ralf.gawlick@bc.edu