Events

Traditional Irish Céili

Traditional Irish Céili

Live traditional Irish music with dance instruction. All are welcome!

September 05

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Contact
Joan Reilly

Writers Talk: John Banville & Richard Ford in Conversation

Writers Talk: John Banville & Richard Ford in Conversation

John Banville is the author of seventeen novels including, most recently, Mrs. Osmond. His novel The Sea won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. Born in Wexford, Ireland, and currently living in Dublin, Banville first gained international prominence through a series of four books, Dr. Copernicus, Kepler, The Newton Letter, and Mefisto, all linked by an interest in math or astronomy. His series of mystery novels appear under the pseudonym Benjamin Black. Banville has been awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, Guardian Fiction Prize, Franz Kafka Prize, Irish PEN Award, Prince of Asturias Award for Literature, and the Ordine della Stella d’Italia.

Richard Ford’s first novel, A Piece of My Heart, appeared in 1976. Born in Jackson, Mississippi and currently dividing his time between Maine and New York, he is the author of six other novels, among them The Sportswriter, Let Me Be Frank with You, Canada, and Independence Day, which received the 1996 Pulitzer Prize and is the second volume in his acclaimed Frank Bascombe series. Ford is also the author of five short story collections and a memoir about his parents, Between Them. Recipient of the Rea Award for the Short Story, Pen/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, Pen/Faulkner Award, Prince of Asturias Award for Literature, and Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, Ford is Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University.

Banville and Ford have been close friends for thirty-five years.

September 23

7:00 PM

Devlin Hall, 110

Concert of traditional Irish music with County Down's Tommy Sands

Concert of traditional Irish music with County Down's Tommy Sands

Tommy Sands, County Down's singer/songwriter has achieved something akin to legendary status in his own lifetime. Sands is a rare combination of author, singer, songwriter, and social activist. Please join us for this inspiring event.

October 16

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Theology and Ministry Library, Auditorium

Contact
Joan Reilly

"Digital Humanities & the 1641 Depositions Project" presented by Professor Jane Ohlmeyer, Trinity College Dublin

"Digital Humanities & the 1641 Depositions Project" presented by Professor Jane Ohlmeyer, Trinity College Dublin

 This talk will reflect on the contribution that the 1641 Depositions Project (2007-10) has made to Digital Humanities.  The ‘1641 depositions’ record the events that surrounded the outbreak of the 1641 rebellion primarily from the perspective of the protestant community. In all, about 8,000 depositions or witness statements, examinations, and associated materials, by thousands of men and women of all social classes, amounting to 19,010 pages and bound in 31 volumes, are extant in the Manuscripts and Archives Research Library of Trinity College Dublin. They document losses of goods and chattels, military activity, and the alleged crimes committed by the Irish insurgents, including assault, imprisonment, the stripping of clothes, and murder.

Since 2010, the depositions have been freely accessible online at http://1641.tcd.ie.  What impact has this project had on historical research and our ability to engage with citizen scholars? How has it shaped the discipline of ‘Digital Humanities’ and related conversations around multi-inter, and trans-disciplinarity? 

October 25

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

"Unstoppable Irish: Songs & Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 by Dan Milner

"Unstoppable Irish: Songs & Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 by Dan Milner

The Unstoppable Irish: Songs and Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 will be published on 30 March 2019 by the University of Notre Dame Press (undp.nd.edu).  The book contends that Irish-Catholics integrated rather than assimilated into the New York populace, and examines ways in which traditional, street and early popular songs can enhance historical knowledge by commenting on events from a street-level perspective.  
 

November 07

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Connolly House

Contact
Joan Reilly