Events

Concert of traditional Irish music with County Down's Tommy Sands

Concert of traditional Irish music with County Down's Tommy Sands

Tommy Sands, County Down's singer/songwriter has achieved something akin to legendary status in his own lifetime. Sands is a rare combination of author, singer, songwriter, and social activist. Please join us for this inspiring event.

October 16

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Theology and Ministry Library, Auditorium

Contact
Joan Reilly

"How and Why does Terrorism End?" Lecture by Prof. Richard English, Queen's University Belfast

"How and Why does Terrorism End?" Lecture by Prof. Richard English, Queen's University Belfast

Sponsored by the Global Leadership Institute, Irish Studies, and the Northern Ireland Bureau. Richard English is Professor of Politics at Queen's University Belfast, where he is also Distinguished Professorial Fellow in the Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, and the University's Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Internationalization and Engagement.  Between 2011 and 2016 he was Wardlaw Professor of Politics in the School of International Relations, and Director of the Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence (CSTPV), at the University of St Andrews. He is the author of eight books, including the award-winning studies Armed Struggle: The History of the IRA (2003) and Irish Freedom: The History of Nationalism in Ireland (2006).  His most recent book, Does Terrorism Work? A History, was published in 2016 by Oxford University Press.  He has delivered invited Lectures about his research in more than twenty countries.

October 21

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Connolly House, Andover Room

Contact
gli@bc.edu

"Digital Humanities & the 1641 Depositions Project" presented by Professor Jane Ohlmeyer, Trinity College Dublin

"Digital Humanities & the 1641 Depositions Project" presented by Professor Jane Ohlmeyer, Trinity College Dublin

 This talk will reflect on the contribution that the 1641 Depositions Project (2007-10) has made to Digital Humanities.  The ‘1641 depositions’ record the events that surrounded the outbreak of the 1641 rebellion primarily from the perspective of the protestant community. In all, about 8,000 depositions or witness statements, examinations, and associated materials, by thousands of men and women of all social classes, amounting to 19,010 pages and bound in 31 volumes, are extant in the Manuscripts and Archives Research Library of Trinity College Dublin. They document losses of goods and chattels, military activity, and the alleged crimes committed by the Irish insurgents, including assault, imprisonment, the stripping of clothes, and murder.

Since 2010, the depositions have been freely accessible online at http://1641.tcd.ie.  What impact has this project had on historical research and our ability to engage with citizen scholars? How has it shaped the discipline of ‘Digital Humanities’ and related conversations around multi-inter, and trans-disciplinarity? 

October 25

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

"Unstoppable Irish: Songs & Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 by Dan Milner

"Unstoppable Irish: Songs & Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 by Dan Milner

The Unstoppable Irish: Songs and Integration of the New York Irish, 1783-1883 will be published on 30 March 2019 by the University of Notre Dame Press (undp.nd.edu).  The book contends that Irish-Catholics integrated rather than assimilated into the New York populace, and examines ways in which traditional, street and early popular songs can enhance historical knowledge by commenting on events from a street-level perspective. Dan Milner's lecture will be followed by a concert of Irish music.
 

November 07

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Connolly House

Contact
Joan Reilly

EORAIP: Gaelic Ireland in Medieval & Early Modern Europe

EORAIP: Gaelic Ireland in Medieval & Early Modern Europe

Just how “European” was Gaelic Ireland in the pre-modern era? In the historiography of the medieval and early modern periods, Gaelic Ireland is often depicted as a cultural backwater. Speakers at this conference will examine the extent to which Irish Gaels participated in European cultural trends during the first millennium or so of Irish history and the degree to which they thought of themselves as belonging to a European community.  This may be an appropriate moment for such an examination as Europe faces a new questioning of its identity today.

November 23

9:00 AM – 5:30 PM

Connolly House, First floor

Contact
Joan Reilly