Events

Events

Citizen Lane

Citizen Lane

Irish Studies is delighted to welcome acclaimed Irish film director Thaddeus O'Sullivan for a showing of his documentary drama, "Citizen Lane", after which he will conduct a Q&A with the audience. The film tells the story of Hugh Lane's attempts to establish a museum of modern art in Dublin in the early twentieth century. Lane was himself one of the major collectors of Impressionist paintings, and their fate became a matter of controversy after his untimely death on the Lusitania, during World War I.

February 19

4:45 PM – 7:00 PM

O'Neill Library, Room 247

Contact
Joan Reilly

"Lord Byron, Thomas Moore and the Cosmopolitan Reach of Irish Literature"

"Lord Byron, Thomas Moore and the Cosmopolitan Reach of Irish Literature"

Distinguished Byron Scholar, Professor Jonathan Gross (DePaul University), explores the relationship between Byron, the leading Romantic poet, and Thomas Moore, the Irish author, in the cosmopolitan world of early nineteenth-century London.

April 04

4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Connolly House, Andover Room

Contact
Joan Reilly

"The Infinite Dark" with Donna Hébert's trio, "The Three Ravens"

"The Infinite Dark" with Donna Hébert's trio, "The Three Ravens"

Led by world-renowned poet and author Jane Yolen, the case of The Infinite Dark weaves poetry and music into a performance shot with bright threads from Scots, Irish, and European folklore.

April 04

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Connolly House, Andover Room

Contact
Joan Reilly

Shakespeare and the Modern Irish Theatre – Staging Anglo-Irish relations from 1916 to Brexit

Shakespeare and the Modern Irish Theatre – Staging Anglo-Irish relations from 1916 to Brexit

A lecture by Patrick Lonergan, Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway and Spring 2019 Burns Visiting Scholar in Irish Studies at Boston College.

 

Since 2016, relations between Ireland and England have come under growing strain, with debates about Brexit placing renewed focus on each country’s attitude to national sovereignty. That debate has coincided with a significant increase in Irish productions of Shakespeare, many of which comment both directly and indirectly on contemporary political controversies. Far from being a new development, the exploration of Anglo-Irish relations through Shakespeare has been underway since at least 1916. This lecture tracks that history, showing its impact on great Irish writers from Joyce to Heaney – and on great actors like Orson Welles, Fiona Shaw, and many others.

 

Following the lecture, all are invited to enjoy a beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres reception in Burns Library from 6:00pm-7:00pm. We also encourage to attendees to hear Alvin Jackson speak at 7:00pm on "The Survival of the United Kingdom, 1707-2017: Bloodshed, Borders, and Brexit," a lecture in the Lowell Humanities Series, which will be held in Gasson Hall, Room 100. Jackson is Richard Lodge Professor of History at the University of Edinburgh.

 

For general directions and parking information, please refer to the University's Admissions site. We recommend parking in the Commonwealth Garage.

April 10

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

Burns Library

Contact
Kate Edrington, kate.edrington@bc.edu

Alvin Jackson: The survival of the United Kingdom, 1707-2017:  bloodshed, borders and Brexit

Alvin Jackson: The survival of the United Kingdom, 1707-2017: bloodshed, borders and Brexit

Alvin Jackson is Richard Lodge Professor of History at The University of Edinburgh. His research focuses on modern Irish, Scottish, and British history and has been supported by three major national awards – a British Academy Research Readership in the Humanities (2000), a British Academy-Leverhulme Senior Research Fellowship (2009) and a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship (2014). His interest in the Union and Irish Unionism have made him a leading scholar on Brexit. He has published many articles and six books, including The Two Unions: Ireland, Scotland, and the Survival of the United Kingdom, 1707-2007 (2011, which was shortlisted in Scotland for the Saltire Society’s Scottish History Book of the Year (2012) and for the Ewart-Biggs Irish Literary Prize (2013). In 2014, he was elected as an Honorary Member of the Royal Irish Academy and in 2015 as Member of the Academia Europaea. He was the John J. Burns Visiting Scholar in Irish Studies at Boston College in 1996-1997.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series with the Irish Studies Program and by the Gerson Family Lecture Fund, established by John A. and Jean N. Gerson, P’14.

April 10

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Contact
Lauren Wilwerding

Partitioning Ireland

Partitioning Ireland

Partitioning Ireland

A one day conference (In memory of Professor Alan O’Day [1940-2017])

Connolly House, Boston College. Saturday, 27 April 2019, 9 am – 5:30 pm.

2019 marks the centenary of the Long Committee's report to the UK Parliament recommending the partition of Ireland. This conference will explore the history and legacies of that decision.

Speakers and papers

I. Global Context of Ireland’s Partition

Jason Knirck (Central Washington University), ‘Confederates, Boers, or Silesians? Irish Attempts to find Analogies for Partition in World History’.

Erik Goldstein (Boston University), ‘Partition and Peacemaking after the Great War’.

Shannon Monaghan (Harvard University), ‘Partition as Population Engineering: The Irish Boundary Commission in Comparative Context.

II. Parties Divided over Partition

Timothy McMahon (Marquette University), “It Does Not Matter What the Authors Meant”: Covenanters in Conflict, 1916-1920.

Neil Fleming (University of Worcester), ‘The Conservative Right and the Partition of Ireland’

Robert McNamara (Ulster University), ‘Frank MacDermot, de Valera and the Partition Question in Independent Ireland’ 

III. Nationalism and Partition

Peter McLoughlin (Queen’s University Belfast), ‘Redefining Partition: The Evolution of Nationalist Thinking on the Nature of a Divided Ireland.’

Bridget Keown (Northwestern University), ‘Medical Knowledge, Medical Institutions and Nation Building.’

Sean McGraw (University of Notre Dame), ‘Ireland’s Partition: Founding Moments Generate Space for Political Entrepreneurs.’

April 27

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Connolly House, first floor

Contact
Joan Reilly