Events

Events

Ireland's Global Revolution?

Ireland's Global Revolution?

A lecture by Professor Fearghal McGarry, QUB

In recent years the idea that Easter 1916 forms part of the "seamless robe" that was Ireland's broader experience of the First World War has become widely accepted. This public talk examines how the Easter Rising has come to be remembered in more pluralistic terms during the "Decade of Centenaries" and explores the implications of this commemorative shift in terms of understanding Ireland's post-war experiences. To what extent should the Irish revolution of 1919-23 be understood as part of a global-as well as natioal-story, and how might this be achieved?

September 12

4:15 PM – 6:00 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

Fall 2018 Dalsimer Lecture with reception to follow

Fall 2018 Dalsimer Lecture with reception to follow

The Fall 2018 Dalsimer Lecture, titled Black and Brown Amidst the Orange and Green: Toward a Multiracial History of Ireland, will be presented by Dr. Mark Doyle, Middle Tennessee State University.

The history of nonwhite people in Ireland extends much further, and is much more significant, than many people suppose. This lecture will unclover the deep history of Asian and African immigrants and visitors to Ireland in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, arguing for a new history of Ireland that not only incorporates the experiences of nonwhite people but also uses those experiences to understnad Irish attitudes toward race, immigration, and empire in the modern era.

September 27

5:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

Book Launch: Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First Century Irish Novel, by Kathleen Costello Sullivan

Book Launch: Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First Century Irish Novel, by Kathleen Costello Sullivan

The desire to engage and confront traumatic subjects was a facet of Irish literature for much of the twentieth century. Yet, just as Irish society has adopted a more direct and open approach to the past, so too have Irish authors evolved in their response to, and literary uses of, trauma.

In Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First-Century Irish Novel, Costello-Sullivan considers the ways in which the Irish canon not only represents an ongoing awareness of trauma as a literary and cultural force, but also how this representation has shifted since the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty- first century.

Costello-Sullivan explores the work of Colm Tóibín, John Banville, Anne Enright, Emma Donohue, Colum McCann, and Sebastian Barry. In highlighting the power of narrative to amend and address memory and trauma, Costello-Sullivan argues that these works reflect a movement beyond merely representing trauma toward also representing the possibility of recovery from it.

Kathleen Costello-Sullivan received her PhD in Irish Studies from Boston College in 2004 and is professor of modern Irish literature at Le Moyne College. She is the author of Mother/ Country: Politics of the Personal in the Fiction of Colm Tóibín and editor of Carmilla: A Critical Edition and a critical edition of Poor Women by Norah Hoult.

September 27

7:00 PM

Devlin Hall, 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

A lecture by Professor Breandan Mac Suibhne titled, Mortuary Practice in "the Time of the Famine": Ireland, 1846-52

A lecture by Professor Breandan Mac Suibhne titled, Mortuary Practice in "the Time of the Famine": Ireland, 1846-52

In places where mortality ran high in “the time of the Famine”, the breakdown of traditional mortuary practices compounded the stress of death for the bereaved. Observers of the poor, and, indeed, the poor themselves, represented the abandonment of rituals surrounding wakes and the removal and burial of the dead as a marker of the depths to which famine reduces people, that is, how it pushes them beneath the waterline of humanity: just as extreme want “reduced” the poor to eating what had hitherto been regarded as animal food and to “inhuman” behavior it “reduced” them too to treating their dead like carrion. 

October 11

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Devlin Hall, room 101

Contact
Joan Reilly

Irish Divorce / Joyce's Ulysses

Irish Divorce / Joyce's Ulysses

Professor Peter Kuch speaks about this recent book on divorce in Joyce’s UlyssesBloom’s “Divorce, not now” and Molly’s “suppose I divorced him”—whether whim, wish, fantasy, or conviction—reflect a forgotten Irish practice of petitioning the English courts for divorce that Professor Kuch uncovers in his reappraisal of marriage in Ulysses.

 Peter Kuch is the inaugural Eamon Cleary Professor of Irish Studies at the University of Otago in New Zealand. He has published widely on Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Irish theatre, Irish and Australian film, literary theory  and Irish/Australian history.

October 16

4:30 PM – 6:30 PM

Connolly House, Andover Room

Contact
Joan Reilly

"The Other Wilde Trial - The Mary Travers Scandal", presented by Eibhear Walshe, Director of Creative Writing & Senior Lecturer, University College Cork

"The Other Wilde Trial - The Mary Travers Scandal", presented by Eibhear Walshe, Director of Creative Writing & Senior Lecturer, University College Cork

It is April 1895 and Oscar Wilde is on trial in London at the Old Bailey. In County Cork, a woman called Mary Travers is following the Wilde Trials in the newspapers, increasingly troubled by the growing public outcry. Mary Travers has her own secret, her hidden connection with Oscar Wilde and his parents, William and Jane, and dreads discovery and exposure.  The Diary of Mary Travers,  re-imagines that connection through the eyes of the central figure, Mary Travers . In her diary she reveals her own part in this scandal, her unhappy home life and her intimate connection with two of the most celebrated writers of her time, William and Jane Wilde.

October 23

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Connolly House, Andover Room

Contact
Joan Reilly

Towards Transitional Justice: Recognition, Truth-telling, and Institutional Abuse in Ireland

Towards Transitional Justice: Recognition, Truth-telling, and Institutional Abuse in Ireland

This conference brings together scholars, survivors, and activists in the international field of Transitional Justice, with a specific focus on the Irish state’s response to the nation’s history of institutional abuse. Researchers, students and interested members of the public are welcome to attend.

Traditionally, transitional justice has been focused on moments of dramatic political transformation and transfers of power (i.e., regime change). It promises a more “holistic,” survivor/victim-focused, approach to historic injustice, in part because it combines the four key elements of justice, reparation, truth-telling, and guarantees of non-recurrence. More recently, scholars are considering the application of this approach to the institutional abuses of settled democracies.

Our conference pursues a twofold conversation: we will discuss the efficacy of a transitional justice approach to Ireland’s history of institutional abuse and consider the State’s response to this legacy. Privileging victim/survivor testimony, we will ask the following questions: What do the methods with which Ireland has attempted to deal with its past tell us about the State’s current approach to power and vulnerability? What is it that Ireland still needs to learn about its treatment of vulnerable women and children? What are the implications of recent State-sponsored investigations for contemporary women, children and other citizens in vulnerable situations? Can truth-telling and a guarantee of non-recurrence take place in the absence of access to records and information held in public and private archives?

What can Ireland learn from transitional justice responses to similar histories in other jurisdictions? Does transitional justice have the potential to assist Ireland in building a Human Rights infrastructure and thereby help guarantee non-recurrence of these failures?

November 01

1:00 PM – 8:15 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
Professor James Smith

Towards Transitional Justice: Recognition, Truth-telling, and Institutional Abuse in Ireland

Towards Transitional Justice: Recognition, Truth-telling, and Institutional Abuse in Ireland

This conference brings together scholars, survivors, and activists in the international field of Transitional Justice, with a specific focus on the Irish state’s response to the nation’s history of institutional abuse. Researchers, students and interested members of the public are welcome to attend.

Traditionally, transitional justice has been focused on moments of dramatic political transformation and transfers of power (i.e., regime change). It promises a more “holistic,” survivor/victim-focused, approach to historic injustice, in part because it combines the four key elements of justice, reparation, truth-telling, and guarantees of non-recurrence. More recently, scholars are considering the application of this approach to the institutional abuses of settled democracies.

Our conference pursues a twofold conversation: we will discuss the efficacy of a transitional justice approach to Ireland’s history of institutional abuse and consider the State’s response to this legacy. Privileging victim/survivor testimony, we will ask the following questions: What do the methods with which Ireland has attempted to deal with its past tell us about the State’s current approach to power and vulnerability? What is it that Ireland still needs to learn about its treatment of vulnerable women and children? What are the implications of recent State-sponsored investigations for contemporary women, children and other citizens in vulnerable situations? Can truth-telling and a guarantee of non-recurrence take place in the absence of access to records and information held in public and private archives?

What can Ireland learn from transitional justice responses to similar histories in other jurisdictions? Does transitional justice have the potential to assist Ireland in building a Human Rights infrastructure and thereby help guarantee non-recurrence of these failures?

November 02

9:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Gasson Hall, 100

Contact
Professor James Smith

"Love, Power, and Consent in pre-famine Ireland: a Dublin Courtship", presented by the Fall 2018 Burns Scholar, Dr. Ciaran O'Neill, Ussher Assistant Professor in 19th Century History, Trinity College, Dublin with reception to follow

"Love, Power, and Consent in pre-famine Ireland: a Dublin Courtship", presented by the Fall 2018 Burns Scholar, Dr. Ciaran O'Neill, Ussher Assistant Professor in 19th Century History, Trinity College, Dublin with reception to follow

 What constituted consent in an 1840s relationship? What were the power dynamics in a love affair? How can historians handle intimacy and emotion in their work? This Burns Lecture will open up a conversation around love, class, courtship, and moral conduct by drawing on an unpublished diary held at Trinity College Dublin. The diary is beautifully illustrated and is unique for the double-correspondence it contains between its author, a Trinity law student named James Christopher Fitzgerald Kenney, and his love interest, Mary Louisa McMahon. The diary is at times dark, and at times light-hearted, but it is always compelling.

November 06

4:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Burns Library, Thompson Room lecture, Irish Room reception

Contact
Kate Edrington