Event Calendar

Fall 2019

Spring 2020

Annual Candlemas Lecture: Sarah Coakley: "For Mine Eyes have Seen Thy Salvation": Spiritual Perception and the Works of Justice in Christian Tradition

Sarah Coakley is an Honorary Professor at St Andrews University and a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the Australian Catholic University. Her recent publications include a series of her 2012 lectures entitled Sacrifice Regained: Evolution, Cooperation and God (2019), and her research interests include a number of disciplines related to systematic theology, including the philosophy of science, the philosophy of religion, patristics, and feminist theory. She is the former Norris-Hulme Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge, and has also taught at Lancaster University, Oriel College, Oxford, and Harvard University. Coakley is currently writing the remaining volumes of her systematic theology, and editing her recent papers in philosophy of religion.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series and cosponsored by the Theology Department.

February 05

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Amitav Ghosh: Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean

Amitav Ghosh's writing, which includes nine novels and six works of nonfiction, has been translated into over 30 languages and appeared in publications like The New Yorker, The New Republic, and The New York Times. His most recent publications include The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable (2016) and Flood of Fire (2015), the concluding novel of his Ibis trilogy. Ghosh holds two Lifetime Achievement awards and four honorary doctorates, and he is the first Indian English-language writer to earn the Jnanpith Award for his outstanding contributions to literature. He has taught at Dehli University, Columbia University, Queens College, and Harvard University. His latest book, Gun Island, is due to be published in 2019.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series and cosponsored by the Asian Studies Program, the History Department, and the English Department, and with the support of an Institute for the Liberal Arts Major Grant Award.

February 12

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Mai Ngai: The Chinese Question, the Gold Rushes and Global Politics

Mae M. Ngai is a U.S. legal and political historian interested in questions of immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. She is the author of the award winning Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004) and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010). Ngai has written on immigration history and policy for the Washington Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The Boston Review. Before becoming a historian she was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. She is now writing The Chinese Question, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, Australia, and South Africa; and Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea. She is the Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History at Columbia University.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series.

February 26

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Claudia Rankine: Citizen: An American Lyric

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric (2014) and Don't Let Me Be Lonely (2004); two plays including The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/American Repertory Theater) and will be published with Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue (2009); as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets & Writers' Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artist, and the National Endowment of the Arts. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series and cosponsored by the American Studies Program, the African and African Diaspora Studies Program, the English Department, the History Department, the Sociology Department, Boston College PULSE: Celebrating 50 Years of Service, and with the support of an Institute for the Liberal Arts Major Grant Award. 

 

March 18

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Fiction Days presents Min Jin Lee: Pachinko

Min Jin Lee is the author of Pachinko (2017) and Free Food for Millionaires (2007). She has received fellowships in Fiction from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study at Harvard, and the New York Foundation for the Arts, and holds an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Monmouth College. Her writing appears in The New Yorker, NPR's Selected Shorts, and One Story amongst other publications. Lee is currently a writer-in-residence at Amherst College. In addition, she serves as a trustee of PEN America, and as a director of the Authors Guild.

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series and cosponsored by the American Studies Program and the Asian American Studies Program.

March 25

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Gasson Hall, Room 100

Poetry Days presents Ada Limón: The Carrying

Ada Limón is the author of five books of poetry, including The Carrying (2018), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry and was named one of the top 5 poetry books of the year by the Washington Post. Her fourth book Bright Dead Things (2015) was named a finalist for the National Book Award, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She serves on the faculty of Queens University of Charlotte Low Residency M.F.A. program, and the online and summer programs for the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center. 

Presented by the Lowell Humanities Series.

April 22

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Devlin Hall, Room 101