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Boston College Experience

Boston College Honors Summer 2017 Approved Undergraduate Course Listing

Please note: these are credit-bearing courses and are only available to students admitted to the six-week Boston College Honors program.  Upon your admission to the Boston College Honors Program, you will receive instructions on how to register for summer courses. Advisors will be available to help you make your choices.

These course are not available to student admitted to Boston College Challenge programs (Digital Communicates, Psychology and Creative Writing), The Business and Leadership Institute, the English Language Immersion,  Natural Disasters and Catastrophes, Forensic Exploration and NECIR. 

COMM 1030  Public Speaking
This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key elements of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speaking and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and
expository addresses. This is a performance course.
COMM 1030 03  June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Joyce Lindmark
COMM 1030 04  June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Brett Ingram


COMM 227801  Social Media
This course examines the cultural, economic and political aspects of emerging computer-mediated communication technologies known as “social media,” including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. Students will critically interrogate the impact of social media on relationships, identity, social/political movements, branding/marketing, and everyday practices. Course will also cover practical social media skills with assignments and activities involving hands-on experience using social media technologies to
create and distribute content.
June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Marcus Breen



EESC 116301:  Environmental Issues and Resources

Learn about the major processes at work inside and on the surface of the earth. Acquire skills that will promote logical decision-making about evaluating and purchasing land and property. Each class designed to examine the facts, historical background, and through homework exercises and virtual labs, provide experience in analyzing and solving real-world problems associated with environmental issues, resources and sustainability. Demonstrations, videos, readings and a campus field trip underscore important concepts and applications.  

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m. Kenneth Galli

ECON 1132 Principles of Economics II — Macro

This course is an analysis of national income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and international aspects of macroeconomic policy.

 June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Zafer Kanik

ENGL 101002  First Year Writing Seminar

Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a course-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets twice a week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Alison Cotti-Lowell

 

ENGL 1080  Literature Core

In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide introduction to literary genres.

 June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Robert Farrell, S.J.


FILM 228301  History of European Cinema


This course is designed to give an overview of several European film movements treated chronologically. Films, readings, discussions and critiques/papers will help develop a critical awareness in students of the film process as well as the content of these movements with contemporary parallels. The movements themselves will be situated in their historical and socio-political context."

June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., John Michalczyk and Susan Michalczyk

HIST 103901  The West and the World: 1500-1789

The past five hundred years witnessed the rise to power and prosperity of Western societies. This course examines the significance of the beginning of global relationships. Includes issues in early modern European history, as well as early exploration, the colonization of America, the African slave trade and the Atlantic economic dependency.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Andrea Wenz

 

HIST 108201  Modern History II - Hybrid Course

This course covers several centuries of time (prior to 1800) and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Peter Berard

 

HIST 283101  Modern America: 1945 to the Present

An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women’s movement, the Reagan years and life in the 1980’s, 1990’s to the present.

June 26–Aug 2, M W, 8:30-11:45 a.m., Alex Bloom

 

HIST 285201  Colonial Latin America, 1400-1820s

This class is a survey of three centuries, from the initial encounter on New World soil of Iberian, African, and native cultures, to the birth of independent culturally- and racially-mixed nations. Our emphasis is on the patterns of conquest and cultural encounter, the processes of colonial rule, the nature of interaction between social groups, and on the cultural impact of the colonial experience upon all Latin American peoples. We study the institutions, cultures, attitudes, and fortunes of Spaniards and Portuguese; African slaves and free blacks; Nahuas and Aztecs, Mayas, and Incas; we discover the roles played in colonial society by a wide variety of peoples, from an African slave on a Brazilian sugar plantation to a Spanish high society woman in Lima to the black and native workers in an Ecuadorian tannery to an Aztec nobleman in Mexico City. The people who lived in colonial Latin America are given a chance to speak for themselves as much as possible; most of the books you will read feature contemporary documents translated from Spanish, Portuguese, and various native languages. June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Mark Christensen

 

MGMT 1021  Organizational Behavior


As an introduction to the study of human behavior in organizations, this course aims at increasing an awareness and understanding of individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational events, as well as increasing a student's ability to explain and influence such events. The course deals with concepts that are applicable to institutions of any type; a central thrust of these concepts concerns the way institutions can become more adaptive and effective. The course is designed to help the student understand and influence the groups and organizations to which he/she currently belongs and with which he/she will become involved in a later career.


ONLINE June 26–Aug 3, including online W 6:30-8:30 p.m., Diletta Masiello


MEETS ONLINE AND INCLUDES A SYNCHRIONOUS WEEKLY VIRTUAL MEETING ON WEDNESDAYS
FULLY ONLINE COURSE - Once per week Synchronous  meeting on Wednesdays.

MATH 1004  Finite Probability and Applications

This course is an introduction to finite combinatorics and probability, emphasizing applications. Topics include finite sets and partitions, enumeration, probability, expectation, and random variables.

MATH 1004 01  June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., TBD

MATH 1004 02  June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., TBD

 

MATH 221001  Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the techniques of linear algebra in Euclidean space. Topics covered include matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vectors in n-dimensional space, complex numbers, and eigenvalues. The course is required of mathematics majors and minors, but is also suitable for students in the social sciences, natural sciences, and management.

June 26–Aug 3, M W TH, 4:00-6:15 p.m., Jamison Wolfe

 

MATH 3353  Statistics

Introductory course in inferential statistics covering the description of sample data, probability, the binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation and hypothesis-testing. Designed for students in business, nursing and the social sciences.

MATH 3353 02 June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Dan Chambers

RLRL 102001  The Drama of Immigration in Contemporary Spanish and Latin American Literature 

The experiences of the displaced, the exile and the immigrant have inspired great literature and cinema in the Spanish speaking world.  This course will delve into a variety of narratives about the perilous journeys of Central Americans and Mexicans making their way to the North, the terrifying voyages of the brave and desperate people crossing to Spain from North Africa, and the struggle to adapt to new social, cultural and linguistic realities.  Students will read, in English translation, short stories, short novellas, and first-hand accounts of immigrant experiences and watch several Spanish-language movies with English subtitles.   All class discussions and assignments will be in English.

June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Christopher Wood

 

RLRL 330201  Racism: French and American Perspectives

French visitors have been observing and commenting on race relations in the United States since before the Civil War. During the twentieth century Paris became a magnet attracting disillusioned African-American artists, musicians and writers in search of a home and an opportunity to express their talents. And today the French confront a history of colonialism and struggle to combat racism as they interact with immigrants from former colonies. What is racism? What are the influences that shape attitudes towards race relations? We will explore these issues in texts and films and investigate the experiences of African-Americans in France.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., James Flagg

SPANISH

SPAN 101501  Elementary Spanish I

This introductory course designed for students with no prior Spanish experience as well as those who have had some high school Spanish. Elementary Spanish I provides a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of student activities. Students will interact in Spanish with the instructor and with classmates. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of basic communicative tasks.

June 26–July 13, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Silvana Falconi

 

SPAN 101601 Elementary Spanish II

Elementary Spanish II continues to provide a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when student activities involve critical thinking about real-world information. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of communicative and writing tasks in different periods.

July 17–Aug 3, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Silvana Falconi

 

SPAN 1115 Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate Spanish I is the first course in the second-year sequence. It continues to develop and strengthen students’ proficiency in the Spanish language as well as to increase their cultural understanding. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking. Throughout the course, students will develop fluency and accuracy, and focus on communication. They will expand the vocabulary and enhance their understanding of essential Spanish grammar concepts. Short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials will provide opportunities to learn to appreciate of cultural differences and impart authentic insight into the Hispanic world.

SPAN 1115 01  June 26–July 13, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Maria Martin de Nicolas

SPAN 1115 02  June 26–July 13, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Mario Lopez-Gonzalez

 

SPAN 111601 Intermediate Spanish II

Intermediate Spanish II is the second course in the second-year sequence with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking. This course focuses on vocabulary building, the examination of some of the finer grammar points, and moving students towards a more complex level of comprehension and expression. Students work with short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials.

SPAN 1116 01  July 17–Aug 3, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Maria Martin de Nicolas

SPAN 1116 02  July 17–Aug 3, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Barbara Sargent

 

 


PHIL 108601  Ethical Identities and Personhood

This course explores contemporary approaches to personhood, including philosophical, theological, and scientific contributions to concepts such as uniqueness and particularity, subjectivity and desire, relationality and communion; freedom and ethical responsibility. In the second half of this course, we address the implications of our investigations to specific contemporary issues, including the influence of technology (e.g. social media, artificial intelligence), market economies, and consumerism on our self-understanding as persons and ethical beings. Throughout this course, we will continually return to two fundamental questions: 1) Who am I? and 2) Who should I become? Our readings and class discussion will assist in formulating answers to these fundamental questions, helping to uncover some of the hidden assumptions guiding our understanding of ourselves. No special background in philosophy will be assumed for this introductory course.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Matthew ClementePOLI 106101 

 

 

 

PHIL 108601  Ethical Identities and Personhood

This course explores contemporary approaches to personhood, including philosophical, theological, and scientific contributions to concepts such as uniqueness and particularity, subjectivity and desire, relationality and communion; freedom and ethical responsibility. In the second half of this course, we address the implications of our investigations to specific contemporary issues, including the influence of technology (e.g. social media, artificial intelligence), market economies, and consumerism on our self-understanding as persons and ethical beings. Throughout this course, we will continually return to two fundamental questions: 1) Who am I? and 2) Who should I become? Our readings and class discussion will assist in formulating answers to these fundamental questions, helping to uncover some of the hidden assumptions guiding our understanding of ourselves. No special background in philosophy will be assumed for this introductory course.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Matthew Clemente

PHIL 108601  Ethical Identities and Personhood

This course explores contemporary approaches to personhood, including philosophical, theological, and scientific contributions to concepts such as uniqueness and particularity, subjectivity and desire, relationality and communion; freedom and ethical responsibility. In the second half of this course, we address the implications of our investigations to specific contemporary issues, including the influence of technology (e.g. social media, artificial intelligence), market economies, and consumerism on our self-understanding as persons and ethical beings. Throughout this course, we will continually return to two fundamental questions: 1) Who am I? and 2) Who should I become? Our readings and class discussion will assist in formulating answers to these fundamental questions, helping to uncover some of the hidden assumptions guiding our understanding of ourselves. No special background in philosophy will be assumed for this introductory course.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Matthew Clemente

Introduction to American Politics – Hybrid Course

Introduction to American Politics is, as the name suggests, an introductory course in American government. The overarching aim of the course is to acquaint students with the fundamental features of the American political system. We will focus our attention on both the bedrock ideals and the key institutions that constitute our regime, and our inquiry will be conducted with eyes to the past, present, and future of American politics. Thus, students will be asked to explore questions like: What kind of political order did the Founders create? How has the system of government they fashioned served our nation over time? To what extent do the values and principles at the heart of our political system continue to illuminate our present-day politics? How well are our governing institutions functioning?

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter NeCastro

 

 

 

 

PSYC 111101  Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science

This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.

June 26–Aug 2, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Janice D’Avignon

 

PSYC 228101  Sports Psychology

This course is a survey of theories and applications of sport and exercise psychology as a science and a practice. The course will examine cognitive, affective, behavioral, and developmental considerations in sport and physical activity. Topics may include: individual aspects such as personality, motivation, and anxiety; social processes such as team cohesion and group dynamics; and mental skills training areas such as confidence, imagery, goal-setting, and concentration.

 June 26–Aug 2, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Kristina Moore

 

 

SOCY 1049  Social Problems

This course is an exploration of different sociological approaches to the study of social problems and social trends in contemporary society. It examines the linkages between social structures/institutions, culture and human experience. The course emphasizes theoretical research issues, especially how, and to what degree, the understanding of social problems are a direct result of the processes used to define social problems as well as the research methods and procedures used to investigate them. Students will learn how to critique popular discourses from a critical sociological perspective and will be encouraged to form their own opinions and critiques.     

June 28 – August 2, M/W  6-9:15 pm,  Jaclyn Carroll

THEO 100201  Biblical Heritage II

The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.

June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jeffrey Cooley