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Carroll Connection

September 2016

Dean Andy Boynton

A MESSAGE FROM DEAN ANDY BOYNTON



“All the world’s a stage,” Shakespeare wrote in As You Like It. More and more, I am struck by how much that insight applies to management and higher education. Whether we’re launching a new product or rolling out a new academic program, we need to start testing, piloting, and rehearsing as early as possible in the development process. In other words, we’d all do well to learn a little stagecraft, as I describe in an article for Harvard Business ReviewRead Andy’s message »

 


A Year of Social Impact

social impact

At first glance, it’s a familiar scene at a business school: students delivering presentations on well-known companies. But on this spring day, the teams were not just sizing up the products, markets, or company financials. They were teasing out an increasingly important indicator of corporate performance—the broader impact each firm is having on society at large.


Leaders Converge at Finance Conference

Finance Conference

Even Jeb Bush says he’s trying to avoid political news these days. But at the Carroll School of Management’s 2017 Finance Conference, he and other leading figures made it clear that politics is not only hard to avoid. It’s a wild card in today’s financial markets. That and disruptive technologies are adding to the challenges ahead for financial professionals.


Slideshow: The Startup Students

angela jin

Many students dream of one day launching their own startups. But some, with the help of social media and Internet technology, are doing just that right now. Here’s a look at seven Carroll School students who have nurtured innovative companies—before walking the commencement stage. »

 


Corporate Citizens

Katherine V. Smith

Corporate social responsibility is a burgeoning movement within the business world, and taking leadership in that movement is Boston College’s Center for Corporate Citizenship, which is part of the Carroll School of Management. “It’s a business practice,” said Katherine V. Smith, executive director, referring to this growing field. “And it’s becoming ingrained.”


FINDINGS


KAY LEMON’S MARKETING JOURNEY

If there’s a theme that threads through all of Kay Lemon’s work—her research, her teaching, even her service to the marketing profession—it’s the quest, she says, “to make marketers better marketers.” That theme surfaces frequently in her research, where she strives to highlight the practical implications of her findings. And it recently reached a kind of culmination in the two years she spent as executive director of the Marketing Science Institute.

 

THE BOOMERS AND THEIR DAUGHTERS

On June 15, the New York Times ran an editorial based on a new study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College titled “How Much Long-Term Care Do Adult Children Provide?” The study found that nearly one in five adult children provide care for an elderly parent at some point and that the burden falls heavily on daughters. The findings by the Carroll School center point to massive challenges at a time when the oldest baby boomers are nearing their eighties.

 

A SESQUICENTENNIAL SORT OF FELLOW

In his prodigious research, Sean Martin (Management and Organization) has turned a skeptical eye toward so-called “heroic CEO stories,” explored how growing up wealthy can affect one’s leadership behavior, and investigated many other questions. Now, in recognition of his research and teaching, Martin has been named the inaugural Mancini Family Sesquicentennial Assistant Professor.

 

WHY CONSUMERS KEEP SUPER-SIZING

It’s no secret that restaurant food portions have grown tremendously over the years, but what accounts for the super-sizing trend? Nailya Ordabayeva (Marketing) and a coauthor have come up with a novel explanation—with new findings published in the Journal of Experimental PsychologySimply put, people are bad at calculating the size of large, three-dimensional objects, such as super-sized packages.


CONNECTIONS


IN SEARCH OF THE “WELL-TEMPERED CITY”

“The world is rapidly urbanizing ... the environment is being destroyed, we’re overconsuming ... we’re seeing droughts in new areas, floods in others ... and most of urban civilization is not prepared for the challenges ahead.” Sounds grim—but there’s good news, says author and real estate developer Jonathan F. P. Rose. He spoke on campus at the invitation of the Joseph E. Corcoran Center for Real Estate and Urban Action.

 

TURNING THE LIGHTS BACK ON

At the end of the spring semester, a team of students in Edward Chazen’s Field Projects in Real Estate course didn’t just receive a grade for their chosen development project. They drew headlines in the Boston Globe and other local outlets. The media attention began almost as soon as the students began working on their bold plan to renovate the long-shuttered Everett Square Theater in Boston’s Hyde Park section.

 

POETS & QUANTS HONORS TWO CARROLL SCHOOL GRADS

“They challenged conventions, overcame odds, and built communities,” Poets & Quants says of the 100 students who made its list of “The Best and Brightest Business Majors—Class of 2017.” And two of the graduates did all that at the Carroll School of Management.