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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Courses

women's and gender studies program

Spring 2018 Approved Courses

Required Courses

Department Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
SOCY Advanced Topics: Transnational Feminisms 559301 Hesse-Biber W 3-5:30pm
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
COMM Advanced Topics 494101 Cuklanz M 3-5:20pm
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Cross-listed Introduction to Feminisms Cross-listed Murphy TTh 4:30-5:45pm

SOCY222501/HIST250201/COMM222501/ENGL212501

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

Cross-listed Introduction to Feminisms Cross-listed Pfeffer MW 3-4:15pm

HIST250202/COMM222502/SOCY222502/ENGL212502

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

Electives

Department

Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
AADS Gender and Slavery 224301 Copeland Th 3-5:20
Discussions of slavery have focused upon the enslaved males' roles and responses. To gain a more complete picture of the complex social interactions and political and social consequences of slavery, we will examine it from the enslaved female's perspective as well. This course focuses upon women's labor, their roles in family life, the plantation community, and how gender informed the style and types of resistance in which men and women engaged. We will also discuss the effects of white paternalism upon gender roles in the slave communities and white female responses to the effects of slavery upon their lives.
APSY Gender Roles 324801 Mahalik W 4:30-6:50pm
This course examines biological, social, and psychological factors that interact in contributing to men's and women's gender roles. Within the social domain, particular attention will be given to how culture affects the social construction of gender, and how factors such as racism and homophobia interact with societally prescribed norms for men and women. The second half of the class will focus on the effects of gender roles on mental and physical health, social problems like aggression, and issues in education, work, and relationships including family life.
CLAS Gender & Sexuality in Ancient Rome 227001 Sutherland MWF 12-12:50
In this course, we will examine Roman views on gender and sexuality during a period covering approximately 200 BCE to 200 CE. We will use literature, epigraphy, and material culture to reconstruct what the ideals of behavior were for Roman men and women, what constituted deviation from these ideals, and how real Romans may actually behaved.
COMM Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference  218001 Ingram  TTh 12-1:15pm

Cross-listed as SOCY336801

This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective. We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about ?acceptable? masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys.

ENGL New Woman in British and Irish Victorian Fiction 440801 Murphy T/Th 9-10:15am
The late nineteenth century saw the flowering of the ?New Woman? movement in fiction. It coincided to a degree with First-Wave feminism and the struggle for women?s suffrage. It had literary debts to contremporary writers such as the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen but also to women writers over the previous century from Maria Edgeworth to George Eliot. This course explores those roots while also attending to the work of some of the seminal New-Woman novelists themselves who came from Irish as well as British backgrounds. They include Olive Schreiner, Sarah Grand, Iota, Mona Caird and George Egerton.
ENGL Victorian Inequality 333101 Hunt MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m.
From ?Dickensian? workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain during an era of revolution and reaction, industrialization and urbanization, and empire building. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor. We will read novels, poetry, and nonfiction prose; authors include Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Elizabeth Gaskell; Charles Dickens; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Prince; Arthur Morrison; and Thomas Hardy.
HIST Gender & Violence in American History 347901 Johnson Th 3-5:25pm
Gender-based violence has a long history in the United States, one that has been shaped by changing gender norms, racial ideologies, and class relations. This course will look at the history of rape and sexual violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how definitions of those offenses have changed over time. By examining several key historical cases, we will explore the experiences of accusers, assailants, and third parties, while assessing the impact of feminism, nativism, and white supremacy in the outcomes. During the course of the semester, students will use primary sources to write a major research paper analyzing a historical case or topic of their own choosing.
HIST Gender in American History 445301 Lyerly MWF 3-3:50pm
This course will explore changing and competing conceptions of manhood, womanhood, and gender relations in American history. Particular attention will be paid to the ways various constructions of gender have served the interests of a race, ideology, or class in American history, the relational nature of gender roles, and the ways prevailing gender ideals influenced men's and women's experiences in America.
HIST Women in U.S. Medicine 284501 Tonn MWF 12-12:50pm
This course surveys the history of women in U.S. medicine from the colonial period to the present. We will consider both the changing place of women within the medical profession and the development of medical knowledge about women's health and disease. How have women practiced medicine as traditional healers, midwives, nurse, physicians, and caregivers? What is the historical relationship between women medical practitioners and the production of medical knowledge about the female body? We will pay particular attention to the structural inequalities within the American medical profession and healthcare system; intersectional approaches to women's history of medicine; and the important role that practitioners, feminists, and patients have played in challenging race and gender based discrimination in medicine as well as gendered assumptions about the female body.
HIST Women and War 348701 Oh W 3-5:25pm
Band of Brothers. The Things They Carried. Apocalypse Now. All Quiet On the Western Front. War is typically depicted as an almost completely male experience, fought by men and men alone. But where are the women? In this course we will explore how gender structures, how people experience war, and how societies wage and understand war, by studying the experiences of women in conflict zones (as combatants, nurses, sex workers, journalists, refugees) and on the home front. After examining cases from around the world in the 20th century students will research and write papers based on topics of their own choice.
ICSP Women and Gender in Islam 331001 Delong-Bas MWF 11am-11:50am

Cross-listed as THEO550001

This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status

SLAV Gender and War in Eastern Europe 206701 TBD TTH 1:30-2:45
A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.
SOCY Gender, Identity, and Sexuality 2181801 Salvi TTH 9am-10:15am

Cross-listed as COMM218101

This course aims to provide an introduction and foundation to the field of gender and sexuality studies. The course will explore the relationship between sex, gender, sexuality, and identity, while also looking at the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, culture, and other positionalities. The course will review the history of gender and sexuality studies, the social construction of identities, the power and privilege of certain identities, the impact of media and popular culture on our understanding of identity, as well as the social movements and future of the LGBTQ+ populations and other identities.

SOCY Inequality in America 107201 Spangler TTH 1:30-2:45
This course examines class inequity in American society. It not only describes how the rich, the poor, and the middle classes live, but also how they relate to one another. Topics include the strategies used by the rich for maintaining the status quo, the hopes cherished by the middle class for improving their position, and the obstacles that keep the poor in their place. Students can choose between readings that emphasize the dynamics of inequality as they are enacted by men or women, and by people of color or Caucasians. 
SOCY Deviance and Social Control 103001 Pfohl TTH 10:30-11:45am
This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms. 
SOCY Gender and Society 102401 Comley TTH 9am-10:15am
This course explores the formation, experience, and change of women's and men's social lives in history. Topics include (1) gendered differences in the organization of power, kinship, economic well-being, race, national identity, and ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and culture; (2) socialization into masculine and feminine social roles; (3) the impact of global economic and technological change on social constructions of gender; (4) gender, popular culture, and the mass media; (5) gender equality and social justice.
SOCY Growing Up Gendered: Contemporary Media Representation 170501 Cuklanz MWF 2-2:50pm
This course explores how conventional and unconventional views of feminine and masculine behaviors for children, adolescents and adults have been circulated in current popular culture through television, film, and advertising over the past two decades. Starting with an examination of children's media, the course will examine how have different theorists and popular media have created and analyzed patterns of representation related to gender, identity, and cultural expectations. Throughout the course we will explore how the categories of gender and sexuality intersect with other dimensions of individual identity such as race, class, and religion. The course will examine a range of commonly gendered themes in popular culture, including sports culture, girlhood, eating disorders, consumerism, romance/bromance, and gendered violence.
SOCY Growing up Gendered: Socio-Cultural Perspectives 170801 Hesse-Biber MWF 1-1:50pm
To what extent is anatomy destiny? We discuss key concepts of sex vs. gender. We delve into the critical societal forces that normalize a gender binary ?male? and ?female.? We address biological, sociological and psychological frameworks that maintain the sex/gender binary across the life cycle (childhood through adulthood). How is our gendered identity constructed? What impacts do families, schools, the mass media and our social relationships on and off-line reinforce or challenge our gender identity? Our sexuality? How does our gender and sexual identity intersect with other dimensions of individual identity such as race, class, ethnicity and sexual preferences? We examine the cultural pressures on women to be slender and men to be muscular body and ways in which conformity to these body image ideals can lead to eating disorders and gendered violence. The class includes lectures, small group discussions, and group reflection projects.
SOCY Reproduction and Reproductive Justice 337401 Diamond-Brown F 9am-12pm
Reproduction is biological and social, local and global, personal and political. In this course we will ask: how does society shape people's options and experiences of reproduction? We will examine the relationship between self, body, and society through topics such as: conception, pregnancy, infertility, abortion, birth, surrogacy, reproductive technology, and aging. We will analyze these through a reproductive justice lens, noting how intersecting inequalities of gender, race, class and sexuality affect the politics of reproduction and reproductive governance. This course will primarily focus on the US but will also include a global comparative perspective.
SOCY Mental Illness and Society 331401 Birk MW 1:30-2:45pm
Psychiatric disorders are commonly viewed through a purely biomedical and/or a psychological framework. In this course, we will apply a sociological imagination to the topic and interrogate the ways in which mental illness, often seen as a supremely private "personal trouble, is also a "public issue." We will read the works of both classic and contemporary scholars, but we will also use memoirs and films to sensitize us to the experience of mental illness itself. We will explore mental illness as a social construction, stigma, labeling theory, as well as issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality in mental illness.

 

1. In order to request that a course taken abroad substitute for a Women's and Gender Studies minor elective, you must provide the following:

  • Syllabus for course taken abroad and/or course description
  • Course reading list (if available)
  • Printout of student course history as proof that you have taken and passed the course in question. This can be accessed through the Agora Portal

2. Once these items have been prepared, contact gender@bc.edu to schedule a meeting with the WGS Program Director. The director will review the provided materials and work with the student to determine whether or not the course will qualify for a BC course substitution. It is helpful to think about, prior to meeting, under what academic department the course most appropriately falls. If you have a BC-equivalent course in mind, this can expedite the process.

Please contact gender@bc.edu with any questions regarding the above procedures.

African and African Diaspora Studies Race, Class, and Gender AADS1138
Communication Gender Roles and Communication COMM4451, CO451
Communication Media and Cultural Studies COMM2236
History Latin American Women Represent Themselves HIST4336
Psychology Interpersonal Violence PSYC3334
Sociology Gender, Health, and Inequality SOCY3370
Sociology Women and the Body SOCY1089
Theology Spirituality and Sexuality THEO3261
Theology HIV/AIDS and Ethics THEO5498
Communication
Media and Cultural Studies
COMM2236
Ingram
MWF 11
Description: This course will analyze the many ways power is consolidated, negotiated, or resisted through popular media, especially advertising, television, film, and social media. We will examine how correspondences between mass communication and economic structures impact cultural, political, and ideological processes in society, including (but not limited to) the construction of gender roles, sexual norms, racial and ethnic identities, class affiliations, and attitudes towards violence. This course will be theoretically rooted in the critical tradition of media studies, with particular emphasis on 20th century continental and American cultural and social theory.
Communication
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM4451
Cuklanz T TH 1:30
Description: This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising.
Economics Topics in the Economics of Gender
ECON3302
Anukriti T TH 10:30
Description: This course will examine gender disparities in both developed and developing countries through an economic lens. Among others, we will study topics such as domestic violence, son preference, prostitution, fertility, and discrimination in the labor market.
English
Contemporary American Women Writers
ENGL5510
Tanner
T TH 1:30
Description: Focusing primarily on fiction written by American women in the last twenty five to thirty years, this course will explore issues of identity, embodiment, family, friendship, race, domestic space, ethnicity, power and violence, as well as gender. In approaching each literary text, we will aim to situate it within the context of contemporary American cultural tensions and to explore in detail its construction as a work of art that manipulates language and literary form. Authors may include Toni Morrison, Jhumpa Lahiri, Marilynne Robinson, Gish Jen, Nicole Krauss, Louise Erdrich, Lorrie Moore and others.
History
Gender and War in Eastern Europe
HIST2284
Simmons
T TH 1:30
Description: A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.
History Family, Marriage & Sexuality in Er. Mod. Europe HIST2863 Hamer
MWF 12
Description: The body of regulations governing marriage and sexuality increased exponentially in the early modern period, and families came to be understood as the foundation for social and political order. This course explores the celebration of marriage and the vilification of unrestrained sexuality in early modern culture, law, and politics. In particular, we will look at the ways gender, class, and race effected what was perceived as acceptable behavior.
History
Study and Writing of History: Gender and Violence
HIST3479 Johnson
TH 3-5:25
Description: Gender-based violence has a long history in the United States, one that has been shaped by changing gender norms, racial ideologies, and class relations. This course will look at the history of rape and sexual violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how definitions of those offenses have changed over time. By examining several key historical cases, we will explore the experiences of accusers, assailants, and third parties, while assessing the impact of feminism, nativism, and white supremacy in the outcomes. During the course of the semester, students will use primary sources to write a major research paper analyzing a historical case or topic of their own choosing.
History
Study and Writing of History: American Family History
HIST3484 Oh
W 3-5:25
Description: This course examines the history of the American family from the end of World War II to the late 1960s. We will use a range of primary and secondary sources to explore major issues and themes connected to the family, including the Cold War, the civil rights movement, domesticity, work, and consumption. We will pay special attention to how family life, both ideal and lived, interacted with changing ideas about gender roles, sexuality, race, and class.
History
Gender in American History
ENGL4453 Lyerly
MWF 11

Description: This course will explore changing and competing conceptions of manhood, womanhood, and gender relations in American history. Particular attention will be paid to the ways various constructions of gender have served the interests of a race, ideology, or class in American history, the relational nature of gender roles, and the ways prevailing gender ideals influenced men's and women's experiences in America.

Islamic Civilization & Societies Women and Gender in Islam
ICSP3310
Delong-Bas
MWF 1
Description: This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status.
Psychology
Psychology of Gender
PSYC3344
Dempewolff T TH 12
Description: This course involves a multi-faceted and critical look at how gender shapes identities, beliefs, and behavior. Rather than concentrating on questions of sex differences, we will explore how females and males do gender in their everyday lives. We will review competing theoretical models and scrutinize empirical findings that support and fail to support common sense ideas about gender. Topics include a number of controversial issues such as violence in intimate relationships, sexual orientation, media constructions of femininity and masculinity, ethnic/racial/cultural critiques of feminist psychology, and gender harassment.
Sociology
Deviance and Social Control
SOCY1030
Pfohl T TH 3
Description: This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms.
Sociology Gender and Sports
SOCY3358 Kim T TH 12
Description: This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
Sociology
Gender, Health and Inequality
SOCY3370 Barko MWF 2
Description: This course explores interactions between gender, health and inequality. Viewing gender (and race, class, sexuality and other identities as inseparable) and as inextricably linked to discussions of health and inequality, this course will discuss social constructions of these categories and how they are connected. For example, what does health even mean and who decides? Are unequal health outcomes due to life chances or life choices? How do we understand nature/nurture debates? While emphasis will be given to sociological approaches, health will be explored holistically and theories will be integrative (e.g. including psychology, biology and epigenetics). Applied topics range from mental and physical paradigms of health, alongside environmental and contested illnesses in a 'post-natural' world.
Sociology
Transnational Feminisms
SOCY5593 Hesse-Biber W 3-5:30
Description: This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Sociology Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference SOCY3368 (COMM2180) Ingram TBD
This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective.  We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about “acceptable” masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys. 
African and African Diaspora Studies
Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues
AADS7493 (SCWK7723) ABDI or GREEN WRIGHT
W 9-10:50 or W 4:30-6:20
Description: The course provides a critical perspective on current issues and problems in American racism, sexism, heterosexism, ablism, and ageism. These issues and problems are studied in the context of the dynamics of social process, historical and anthropological perspectives, and theories of prejudice and social change. Social work's responsibility to contribute to solutions is emphasized. Different models for examining the issues of race, sex, sexual orientation, age and ability are presented. Department Permission Required
Communication Gender and Sexuality
COMM4427 OWENS T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major
This seminar will consider the ways in which people ?do? gender and sexuality through their communicative practices, and the sociocultural institutions that have historically shored up such practices. The course is intended to raise students? awareness regarding the ways that gender and sexuality are created, maintained, and/or changed through various communication modes. Students will gain theoretical insights and develop analytical skills to identify gendered expectations, learn how such expectations serve to limit the practice of sexuality for both women and men, and understand how numerous subdisciplines in communication studies have staked claims in gender and sexuality research.
Communication Gender and Media COMM2251 OWENS T TH 3-4:15
Description: Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
This course will explore the ways gender factors into media production, representation, and audiences. In particular, it will focus on gender across multiple media contexts, including sport, advertising, magazines, news coverage, fiction, film, documentary, television programming, online communities, social media, and popular music. It also will consider gender within both mainstream and independent media production. Further, it will explore how gender is used to study, construct, and address media audiences. Overall, this class will address how gender becomes a tool of social and cultural power and how its use both empowers and disempowers various cultural groups.
Communication
Media and Cultural Studies
COMM2236
INGRAM MWF 11
Description: This course will analyze the many ways power is consolidated, negotiated, or resisted through popular media, especially advertising, television, film, and social media. We will examine how correspondences between mass communication and economic structures impact cultural, political, and ideological processes in society, including (but not limited to) the construction of gender roles, sexual norms, racial and ethnic identities, class affiliations, and attitudes towards violence. This course will be theoretically rooted in the critical tradition of media studies, with particular emphasis on 20th century continental and American cultural and social theory. Major Restricted
Communication
Cultural Diversity in the Media COMM2285
MATELSKI MW 3-4:15 or MW 4:30-5:45
Description: This course will examine gender disparities in both developed and developing countries through an economic lens. Among others, we will study topics such as domestic violence, son preference, prostitution, fertility, and discrimination in the labor market.
Communication
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM4451
CUKLANZ T TH 1:30
Description: This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
English
Reading the Body
ENGL1702
TANNER T TH 3-4:15/6-6:50
Description: This course will use literature to explore how the experience of embodiment shapes human identity in contexts including illness, obesity, poverty, disability, pregnancy, trauma, and aging. Through the analysis of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, we will consider the way that bodily experiences, material conditions and cultural constructions of normalcy shape our understanding of identity in sickness and in health. In our class discussions, we will consider how literary representations of bodies in sickness and health might influence real world actions and interactions by establishing distance or constructing empathy through the act of reading. Course open to freshmen only
English Celtic Heroic Age: Word and Image
ENGL2101 O'LEARY T TH 3-4:15
Description: This course will explore the vernacular heroic literature of the insular Celts, that is, the Irish and the Welsh. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of Christian transmission on pagan source material, mythological survivals, the heroic worldview and value system, the nature of insular Celtic kingship, and the role of women in the heroic literature.
English
Victorian Inequality
ENGL3331
HUNT
TH 1-2:45
Description: From 'Dickensian' workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain during an era of revolution and reaction, industrialization and urbanization, and empire building. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor. We will read novels, poetry, and nonfiction prose; authors include Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Gasketll, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Mary Prince, Author Morrison, and Thomas Hardy. 
History
Understanding Race, Gender, and Violence
HIST1503 (SOCY1503) JOHNSON and MCGUFFEY
MWF 2 and        TH 6-6:50
Description: This course explores pressing problems of modern race and gender-based violence across the globe, including domestic violence, youth gangs, police violence, sexual assault, and genocide. Using both historical and sociological perspectives, we will examine the roots of such violence, the ways in which it has been expressed, the meanings attached to it, and its implications for society--particularly for racial/ethnic minorities, women, and LGBT people. The lab for the course will involve students in collaborative work with local anti-violence projects and organizations in the Boston area. Course open to freshmen only
History
An Outsider's History of the High and Late Middle Ages
HIST2221 MATUS T TH 12-1:15

Description: This course is an introduction to the High and Late Middle Ages that focuses on voices of marginal individuals and groups. Women, Jews, dissenters, beggars, (false) prophets, and the possessed-not necessarily mutually exclusive categories-will be subjects of our study. Our central concern will be the shaping of medieval societies through the tension between the peripheral and the traditional.

History Latin American Women Represent Themselves
HIST4336 LEVENSON-ESTRADA T TH 12-1:15
Description: After reading one general history of women and gender in Latin America, students will read testimonies by Latin American women. We will deal with the problem of the structure women give to their own lives in their narratives, as well as with more straightforward issues such as the sexual division of labor, and the nature of family and of gender relations in Latin America. The testimonies will be used as windows into objective and subjective history and the ways in which these two intersect.
Islamic Civilization and Societies
Inside the Kingdom: Conversations with Saudi Women
ICSP2226
BAILEY TH 3-4:15
Description: This course is a collaborative project with Taibah Univerity in Medinah, Saudi Arabia. The course focuses on women in Saudi Arabia, including political rights, education, economic and social roles, as well as the influences of religion and culture in their lives. We will speak twice a month with students from Taibah University by videoconference to discuss these issues. A variety of sources will be used in the course including biographies, fiction and films. The course is graded pass/fail. 2 Credits.
Political Science Seminar: American Culture War
POLI3358
WOLFE M 3-5:30
Description: Since at least the 1960s, pundits and social scientists have talked about the existence of a profound culture war in the United States. On issues ranging from abortion to immigration to homosexuality, we have been told, America is divided into two major camps, one leaning to the left and the other to the right. This course will examine the evidence behind such assertions, concentrating on some of the key issues around which theories of America's culture war are organized.
Psychology Interpersonal Violence PSYC3334 TISHELMAN T 6-8:30
Description: This course will review research, assessment, treatment, and current controversies in the area of family violence, focusing on child sexual abuse, child physical abuse, and spousal abuse. The course will consist of a combination of lecture and class discussion on the issues, including those related to memories of abuse, identification of abuse, and the legal, psychological, and social ramifications of extracting women and children from abusive homes.
Sociology
Deviance and Social Control
SOCY1030
PFOHL T TH 10:30-11:45
Description: This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms.
Sociology
Gender and Sports
SOCY3358
KIM MW 3-4:15
Description: This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
Sociology Gender, Health, and Inequality
SOCY3370 BARKO MWF 2
Description: This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective.  We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about “acceptable” masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys. 
Sociology Studies in Crime and Social Justice SOCY3310 HEDGES M 4:30-7
Description: Crime and social justice is considered not as distinct, but indivisible constructs produced through specific knowable institutional/personal practices. Course allows students to analyze perspectives on the process through which laws and criminal justice institutions have been/continue to be constructed; situate crime study within a "power reflexive" framework, while being attentive to the operation of race, class, and gender as features of contemporary social relations/institutions; discuss contemporary intellectual and practical efforts challenging existing conceptual and political structures relating to crime and social justice; and imagine/articulate institutions paralleling the vision of social justice developed throughout the course.
Sociology Culture Through Film
SOCY3388 HAMM W 3-6
Description: We will explore contemporary issues, perception and reality, language, race, gender, sexual orientation, indigenous rights, marriage, colonialism, protest and chaos, and attempt to "think outside the box." Each week we will view one or more films that raise questions about the ways we understand these issues. The films have been selected to enable us to experience alternative ways of thinking about concepts with which we probably feel comfortable. The goal of the course is to allow us to realize that many of our beliefs are cultural constructions and in fact are always in the process of revision.
Sociology Images and Power SOCY5532 PFOHL W 3-5:30
Description: This seminar involves an historical sociological exploration of social technologies of image-making in art, science, religion, advertising, politics and everyday life. Of particular concern is the cognitive, moral and bodily power of images in relation to the cultural politics of class, race, sex and gender. Course participants are expected to engage with a wide range of critical literatures pertaining to the material and imaginary power of images and to engage in ethnographic fieldwork, resulting in a mixed-media study of the power of imagery in a particular social scene or institution.
Spanish
Hispanic Women Writers SPAN666901
RHODES
T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: Escritoras hispánicas enhances students' understanding of the historical, cultural and religious currents that have influenced the status of women in the Spanish-speaking world and continue to do so today.  In that context, students learn to identify strategies of resistance to this tradition as reflected in contrastive analysis of artistic texts from the early modern and contemporary periods.  A strong theoretical introduction grounds their subsequent inquires. Through rigorous textual analysis, they learn to deploy pertinent historical and textual details that complement texts by and about hispanic women.  Course conducted in Spanish.
Sociology Women and the Body SOCY1089 HESSE-BIBER T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: This course covers Western cultural pressures on women be super-slender. We analyze biological, sociological, and feminist perspectives on the body especially with regard to issues of beauty and body image and sexuality. We analyze how race, ethnicity and class intersect to create differences among womens relationship to their bodies. In what way do biological perspectives illuminate as well as cloud understanding of women's relationship to their bodies? We explore mass-mediated pressures on women's bodies through films, women's magazine, reality TV, and social networking sites. We examine the plastic surgery industry and the growing trend toward "designer bodies."
Theology Women and the Church   THEO5481 HINSDALE T 4:30-6:50
Description: The religious and social experience of women from a variety of cultures, including the experience of class participants, form the basis of this seminar. We will 1) study the historical roots of Christian feminist theology; 2) explore the critiques and alternative reconstructions of traditional understandings of the Bible, God, human beings and their relationship to the world that have been offered by Christian feminist theologians writing from a variety of ideological perspectives; and 3) investigate the ways in which women have defined themselves in relationship to the church, particularly in terms of spirituality and ministry.
Theology HIV/AIDS and Ethics
THEO5498 KEENAN MW 3-4:15
Description: This course looks at how we can understand a bit better the ethics of public health through the lens of HIV/AIDS. There besides studying the virus itself, we examine the varied related ethical issues regarding stigma, prevention, research, gender inequity, economic disparities, local culture, religion, funding, and access.
Theology Spirituality and Sexuality   THEO3261 MCDARGH W 10-12:25
Description: How does our experience of ourselves as sexual beings open us to the experience of the holy, and conversely, how might our desire for God be intimately related to our sexual desire and longings? These are the questions that will be the focus of our work. Not a course on sexual ethics, this course is an exploration of the complex interrelationship of sexual and spiritual desire as both are reflected upon in the Christian spiritual tradition.
Theology Classics of Christian Spirituality
THEO3244 PREVOT T TH 9-10:15
Description: The history of Christian spirituality is a history of interactions between the superabundant life of God and the precarious lives of human beings. In this course, we will examine the conversion stories, ascetical practices, mystical experiences, and works of mercy and justice that have shaped Christian spirituality throughout the ages. We will focus on the lives and teachings of several holy women, such as Sts. Perpetua and Felicity, St. Mary of Egypt, St. Macrina, Marguerite Porete, St. Catherine of Siena, Julian of Norwich, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sojourner Truth, Etty Hillesum, and Nancy Mairs. We will think critically about the many different ways that these women bear witness to the life-giving Spirit of God in the midst of a sinful and suffering world.
Classics
Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome
CLAS227001
SUTHERLAND
MWF 12-12:50

Description:
In this course, we will examine Roman views on gender and sexuality during a period covering approximately 200 BCE to 200 CE. We will use literature, epigraphy, and material culture to reconstruct what the ideals of behavior were for Roman men and women, what constituted deviation from these ideals, and how real Romans may actually behaved.

Communication
Media and Cultural Studies
COMM2236
INGRAM T TH 12-1:15
Description: This course will analyze the many ways power is consolidated, negotiated, or resisted through popular media, especially advertising, television, film, and social media. We will examine how correspondences between mass communication and economic structures impact cultural, political, and ideological processes in society, including (but not limited to) the construction of gender roles, sexual norms, racial and ethnic identities, class affiliations, and attitudes towards violence. This course will be theoretically rooted in the critical tradition of media studies, with particular emphasis on 20th century continental and American cultural and social theory. Major Restricted
Communication
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference
COMM2180 INGRAM
MWF 11-11:50
Description: Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective. We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about ?acceptable? masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys.
Communication
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM4451
CUKLANZ T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
Communication
Advanced Topics
COMM4941
CUKLANZ
T 3-5:20
Description:
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Communication
Media:Pop Culture
COMM4463
OWENS
M W 6-7:15
Description: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major
Media are a significant and primary contributor of popular culture in American society. This writing intensive course will explore and critically analyze the role of media in constructing and reflecting popular norms, values, and trends. Students will use a variety of texts to discuss the extent to which various types of media, including video games, music, TV, and magazines shape and reinforce society's ideas regarding issues such as race, class, gender, war, and patriotism.
English Versions in Black: Genres of Black Women's Writing
ENGL2201
FREDERICK T TH 12-1:15
Description:
The phrase "Black Women's Writing" suggests that such writing is a fixed or homogeneous body of work that can be neatly defined and represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea. By re-thinking these works, we also re-examine notions of literary canon, race, gender, sexuality, community, and history. Significantly, we "de-construct" common notions of Black Women's Writing by examining the varied genres these writers use to express their imaginings. Required readings come from the fields of science fiction (Octavia Butler), prose/experimental (Gayl Jones and Martha Southgate) novels, drama (Suzan-Lori Parks), poetry (Elizabeth Alexander), and autobiography/memoir (Toi Derricotte).
English Women and Russian Literature
ENGL1153
SIMMONS
T TH 10:30-11:45
Description: All texts read in English translation
A study of the representations of women in Russian literary works from the Kievan period to date, with a special emphasis on classical and post-modern literature. An exploration of the notions of the "strong woman" versus the "superfluous man", and of "terrible perfection", a discussion of the utility of these concepts in characterizing the literary representations.
English Gender and Sexuality in Victorian Literature
ENGL6613 HUNT T 2-4:25
Description:
This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy.
History Sex, Sexuality, and Gender
HIST4249 CAVALLARI M 4:30-6:55
An integral part of the human experience, sex, sexuality and gender have repeatedly been dissected, defined, evaluated, feared and celebrated. In the process, these topics have also become central to questions of identity, history, politics and culture. Through reading and discussion of primary and secondary texts, this course introduces students to the multiple and conflicting roles that sex, sexuality, and gender have played in modern Western societies from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include the critical examination of gender and its construction; the social control of "deviant" sexualities; notions of sex and the historical construction of sexual identity; sex, sexuality and gender in public discourse; and queer theory in historical practice.
History Women and Gender in Modern China
HIST4048
MO MWF 1-1:50
Description:
This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy.
Islamic Civilization and Societies
Women and Gender in Islam
ICSP3310 DELONG-BAS MWF 1-1:50
Description:
This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status.
Italian Love, Sexuality, & Gender/European Literary Tradition
ITAL3373 MORMANDO T TH 12-1:15
Description: Conducted entirely in English. Elective for Italian major and minor.
This course explores the modern conception of "romantic love" by examining its birth and development in prominent literary works (by men and women) of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. We will also investigate allied notions of sexuality, gender, and marriage, in both a heterosexual and same-sex ("homosexual") context. For contrast and comparison, the course begins with a study of the Bible and ancient Greek and Roman texts and ends with a look at the depiction of our themes in contemporary cinema as well as a discussion of the current debate in American society over the nature and purpose of marriage.
Lynch School of Education
Gender Roles APSY3248 PORTILLO W 4:30-6:50
COURSE RESTRICTED TO LSOE STUDENTS ONLY. This course examines biological, social, and psychological factors that interact in contributing to men's and women's gender roles. Within the social domain, particular attention will be given to how culture affects the social construction of gender, and how factors such as racism and homophobia interact with societally prescribed norms for men and women. The second half of the class will focus on the effects of gender roles on mental and physical health, social problems like aggression, and issues in education, work, and relationships including family life.
Sociology
Deviance and Social Control
SOCY1030
PFOHL T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms.
Sociology
Gender and Sports
SOCY3358
KIM T TH 12-1:15
Description: This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
Sociology Adv. Topics: Transnational Feminisms
SOCY5593 HESSE-BIBER TH 3-5:30
Description:
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Department Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
African and African Diaspora Studies
Black Feminisms 101: Harriet Tubman to Beyonce
AADS224101
JEAN-CHARLES
T TH 10:30-11:45AM

Black feminists have long explored the question of race versus gender in their politics, theories, and writing. This class takes a closer look at the intersection of race and gender by using Black feminist thought as a lens to examine literature and popular culture. We will read writers and theorists from Africa and the diaspora to provide definitions of Black feminism. We consider how race and gender have been thought about over time.

African and African Diaspora Studies Race, Class, and Gender
AADS1138 MCGUFFEY
M W 3-4:15PM
Cross-listed with Sociology (SOCY1038). Viewing race, class, gender, sexuality, and other identities as inseparable from discussions of inequality and power, this course will begin by discussing the social construction of these categories and how they are connected. We will then look at how these social identities shape and are also shaped by four general subject areas: (1) wealth and poverty, (2) education, (3) family, and (4) crime, law, and social policy. Although this course is separated into subject areas, we shall see that these areas greatly overlap and are mutually influenced by one other.
Communication
Gender and Media
COMM2251 OWENS
T TH 3-4:15PM
This course will explore the ways gender factors into media production, representation, and audiences. In particular, it will focus on gender across multiple media contexts, including sport, advertising, magazines, news coverage, fiction, film, documentary, television programming, online communities, social media, and popular music. It also will consider gender within both mainstream and independent media production. Further, it will explore how gender is used to study, construct, and address media audiences. Overall, this class will address how gender becomes a tool of social and cultural power and how its use both empowers and disempowers various cultural groups.
Communication
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM4451
CUKLANZ T TH 12-1:15PM
This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
Communication
Cultural Diversity in the Media
COMM2285
MATELSKI
M W 3-4:15PM
Description: Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
In an age where the world's political borders are changing rapidly, cultural artifacts found in mass communication become increasingly important. This course examines the relationship of culture and the mass media in creating a new concept of America, based on race, ethnicity and gender. From this exploration, students will be able to critique the impact of television, radio, film, cartoons, newspapers, magazines, books and the music industry on cultural perception.
English
Love, Gender, & Marriage: Writing and Rewriting Tradition
ENGL1704
AINSWORTH
MWF 12-12:50PM
Description: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions
This section of First-Year Writing Seminar is paired with Professor Mormondo's literature core class on ?Love, Gender and Marriage.? As in all sections of the writing core, this one is intended to prepare students for writing at the college level, in a variety of genres and across disciplines. In this section, the subject of our inquiry will be how historical constructions of romantic love, gender and marriage are reflected in our popular culture, legal and political spheres. Assignments will include rhetorical analyses, personal editorials, event reflections, and a longer research project with a multimedia component.
English Versions in Black: Genres of Black Women's Writing
ENGL2201
FREDERICK T TH 9-10:15AM
Description: 
The phrase "Black Women's Writing" suggests that such writing is a fixed or homogeneous body of work that can be neatly defined and represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea. By re-thinking these works, we also re-examine notions of literary canon, race, gender, sexuality, community, and history. Significantly, we "de-construct" common notions of Black Women's Writing by examining the varied genres these writers use to express their imaginings. Required readings come from the fields of science fiction (Octavia Butler), prose/experimental (Gayl Jones and Martha Southgate) novels, drama (Suzan-Lori Parks), poetry (Elizabeth Alexander), and autobiography/memoir (Toi Derricotte).
English Topics in Theory
ENGL4427
LYDENBERG T TH 12-1:15PM
In this course we will wander into the high altitudes of contemporary theory, exploring some key texts that have been particularly influential on literary studies. Such topics as ?Theorizing Culture,? ?Theorizing the Subject,? ?Theorizing the Visual,? ?Theorizing Sex, Gender and Race,? ?Theorizing Representation,? will be approached from multiple perspectives including, but not limited to, deconstruction, gender theory, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Readings will likely include texts by Derrida, Lacan, Kristeva, Irigaray, Barthes, Bal, Hooks and others.
English The Single Girl in the 19th Century
ENGL3359 WILWERDING T TH 10:30-11:45 AM
This course will approach nineteenth-century literature and culture through the lens of one figure: the unmarried woman. By considering major works ? fiction and non-fiction ? that feature all types of single ladies, from fallen women to eligible bachelorettes, career girls to widows and old maids, this course will address questions of gender and occupation in both literature and history. Texts range from novels by George Eliot and Charles Dickens to poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, as well as relevant criticism and theory.
English Contemporary American Women Writers
ENGL5510 TANNER T TH 10:30-11:45 AM
Focusing on literature written by American women from 1980 to the present, this course will explore issues of space, family dynamics, immigration, power, race, violence, grief, and embodiment, as well as gender. We will ask questions such as: How do these writers define space, and use literature to claim a space of their own? What is the relationship between gender and race or ethnicity, in a given text and in contemporary American culture? How do women writers represent the intangible dynamics of emotional connection and loss? How does fiction represent changing experiences of embodiment, including pregnancy, obesity, illness, and aging?
French Contemporary Francophone Women Writers
FREN4454 JEAN-CHARLES W 3-5:20PM
This course explores the specificity of francophone women's writing in a contemporary context, examining narratives from a wide variety of geographic locations including the Caribbean, North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. The question of genealogy is central to this course as we attempt to delineate a matrilineal francophone literary tradition. As such we will also consider these narratives in relation to feminist theory, history, socio-cultural politics, culture and ethnicity. Some of the themes we will study include silence and voice, the female body, mother-daughter relationships, migration and immigration, and canon formation.
History Latin American Women Represent Themselves
HIST4336 LEVENSON-ESTRADA T TH 10:30-11:45AM
After reading one general history of women and gender in Latin America, students will read testimonies by Latin American women. We will deal with the problem of the structure women give to their own lives in their narratives, as well as with more straightforward issues such as the sexual division of labor, and the nature of family and of gender relations in Latin America. The testimonies will be used as windows into objective and subjective history and the ways in which these two intersect.
History Contested Cities: Race, Class, and Sexuality
HIST5480
JOHNSON TH 4:30-6:50PM
This course will explore how racial and ethnic newcomers encountered the American city in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Looking at various groups - older European and Asian immigrants, black migrants from the South, sexual minorities, and recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean - we?ll look at how these newcomers worked, played, organized, and claimed space in the city. We?ll pay particular attention to social and political struggles over urban spaces including neighborhoods, commercial districts, amusement areas, and public parks. Students will conduct research on migrant communities in Boston and collaborate in the production of digital public history projects.
History Early American Women
HIST4454 LYERLY MWF 1-1:50PM
This lecture-discussion course explores American women from European contact to the Civil War. Themes include the diversity of women's experience, views of women, the family, social movements, work and the law.
Honors Program
Do the Virtues Have Gender?
HONR4940 BAYLES M 6:30-9PM
Also offered as POLI1249. The question of virtue lies at the heart of every civilization. So does the question of gender. Historically in the West, some virtues, such as bodily strength, courage in battle, self-control, rational intellect, and leadership, have been seen as masculine and superior to other virtues seen as feminine, such as modesty, industry, frugality, nurturing, and obedience. Is this view natural, rooted in biological sex; or is it conventional, part of a socially constructed system of gender roles? Further, how does the Western debate over these questions compare with the one currently raging in the Islamic world? These questions will be addressed through a wide range of readings, as well as films and other media, from both traditions.
Psychology
Interpersonal Violence
PSYC3334 TISHELMAN T 6-8:30PM
This course will review research, assessment, treatment, and current controversies in the area of family violence, focusing on child sexual abuse, child physical abuse, and spousal abuse. The course will consist of a combination of a lecture and class discussion of the issues, including those related to memories of abuse, identification of abuse, and the legal, psychological, and social ramifications of extracting women and children from abusive homes.
Slavic & Eastern Languages
Women and Gender in Chinese Literature
EALC3164 CHIANG TBD
More information coming soon.
Sociology Studies in Crime and Social Justice
SOCY3310 HEDGES M 4:30-6:50PM
Crime and social justice are considered not as distinct, but indivisible constructs produced through specific knowable institutional/personal practices. Course allows students to analyze perspectives on the process through which laws and criminal justice institutions have been/continue to be constructed; situate crime study within a "power reflexive" framework, while being attentive to the operation of race, class, and gender as features of contemporary social relations/institutions; discuss contemporary intellectual and practical efforts challenging existing conceptual and political structures relating to crime and social justice; and imagine/articulate institutions paralleling the vision of social justice developed throughout the course.
Sociology
Inequality in America
SOCY1072
SPANGLER T TH 3-4:15PM
This course examines class inequity in American society. It not only describes how the rich, the poor, and the middle classes live, but also how they relate to one another. Topics include the strategies used by the rich for maintaining the status quo, the hopes cherished by the middle class for improving their position, and the obstacles that keep the poor in their place. Students can choose between readings that emphasize the dynamics of inequality as they are enacted by men or women, and by people of color or Caucasians.
Theology Spirituality and Sexuality
THEO3261 MCDARGH M 10AM-12:25PM
How does our experience of ourselves as sexual beings open us to the experience of the holy, and conversely, how might our desire for God be intimately related to our sexual desire and longings? These are the questions that will be the focus of our work. Not a course on sexual ethics, this course is an exploration of the complex interrelationship of sexual and spiritual desire as both are reflected upon in the Christian spiritual tradition.
Theology
HIV/AIDS and Ethics
THEO5498
HEYER T TH 9-10:15AM
This course looks at how we can understand a bit better the ethics of public health through the lens of HIV/AIDS. There besides studying the virus itself, we examine the varied related ethical issues regarding stigma, prevention, research, gender inequity, economic disparities, local culture, religion, funding, and access.
CLAS/ENGL Dangerous Women in Classical Literature 224001/220401 Eisenfeld T/Th 3:00-4:15 pm
Demeter sticks a baby in the fire, Amazons cut off one breast and live far away from men, Clytemnestra kills her husband in his bath. In this course we will investigate how Greeks and Romans used stories about female figures - goddesses, monsters, and humans - as a way of talking about a range of conflicts, tensions, and fears. While we focus on the ancient world, we will also look at how these figures are used in later periods and think about which stories we tell about women - and why.
CLAS/HIST Roman Law & Family 223601, 220601 Eshleman MWF 11:00-11:50 am
We will look at the makeup and dynamics of the Roman household through legal sources, which allow investigation of Roman legal arguments and approaches to issues such as marriage, dowry, divorce, disciplining children, adultery, procreation, adoption, and women's rights, and the role of the pater familias. We will also observe similarities and differences between Roman family law and modern American family law. By the end of the course you will have gained a better understanding not only of the Roman family but also of how societies -- including our own -- use law to order and regulate family relationships.
COMM/SOCY Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference 2180/3368 Ingram T/Th 12:00-1:15 pm
Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective. We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about "acceptable" masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys.
COMM
Gender and Media
COMM 2251 Owens
T/Th 3:00-4:15 pm
Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
This course will explore the ways gender factors into media production, representation, and audiences. In particular, it will focus on gender across multiple media contexts, including sport, advertising, magazines, news coverage, fiction, film, documentary, television programming, online communities, social media, and popular music. It also will consider gender within both mainstream and independent media production. Further, it will explore how gender is used to study, construct, and address media audiences. Overall, this class will address how gender becomes a tool of social and cultural power and how its use both empowers and dis-empowers various cultural groups.
COMM
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM 4451
Cuklanz T/Th 12:00-1:15 pm
This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
COMM
Gender and Sexuality COMM 4427
Owens T/Th 9:00-10:15 am
Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major
This seminar will consider the ways in which people "do" gender and sexuality through their communicative practices, and the sociocultural institutions that have historically shored up such practices. The course is intended to raise students' awareness regarding the ways that gender and sexuality are created, maintained, and/or changed through various communication modes. Students will gain theoretical insights and develop analytical skills to identify gendered expectations, learn how such expectations serve to limit the practice of sexuality for both women and men, and understand how numerous sub-disciplines in communication studies have staked claims in gender and sexuality research.
EALC Gender & Sexuality in Chinese Strange Tales 316501 Chiang T/Th 12:00-1:15 pm
Texts read in English translation.
Representations of gender and sexuality in traditional Chinese stories of marvels and anomalies as ways to construct notions of individual selfhood, family, society, state, and the cosmos. Normative gender roles, yin-yang symbolism, ideal femininity and masculinity, the family and polygamy, and cultural conceptions of sexuality and the human body. Special attention to textual representations of cross-dressing, sex change, madness, demonic possession, ghostly haunting, shamanic ecstasy, were-tigers and other shape-shifting animals as embodiments of transgressive desires and artistic disruptions of gendered social order.
ECON Topics in the Economics of Gender 330201 Anukriti T/Th 3:00-4:15 pm
This course will examine gender disparities in both developed and developing countries through an economic lens. Among others, we will study topics such as domestic violence, son preference, prostitution, fertility, and discrimination in the labor market.
Must have successfully completed ECON2201 or ECON 2203, and ECON 2228
ENGL Women and the Avant Gardes 435201 Lydenberg T/Th 1:30-2:45 pm
The literary and visual avant-gardes are often perceived as a predominantly white male domain, its female practioners reduced to companion or Muse, or socially marginalized by race, sexual orientation or madness. In this course we will examine the construction of the concept "woman" by male avant-garde artists and writers in (Dada, Surrealism, Futurism), but our main focus will be on a selection of avant-garde works by women in poetry, prose narrative, critical manifesto, and the visual arts.
ENGL Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries 439301 Wallace T/Th 3:00-4:15 pm
Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.
Satisfies the Women Writers requirement for LSOE.
In this class, we will read Jane Austen's six major novels through the lens of new historicism. Thinking about literature as social process, we will discuss the cultural work done by Austen and other writers of her era, such as Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Wollstonecraft.
ICSP/THEO Women and Gender in Islam 331001, 550001 Delong-Bas MWF 11:00-11:50 am
This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status.
PHIL Feminisms and Philosophies of Difference 648601 McGill MWF 1:00-1:50 pm
What does it mean to call oneself (or someone else) a "feminist"? In attempting an answer to this question, we will consider efforts to reveal, unravel, and remedy the conceptual, psychological, and economic dimensions of the oppression of women. We will discuss a variety of feminisms -- liberal, existential, radical -- and their differing approaches to such "feminist" issues as marriage and domestic violence, reproduction and pregnancy, work and sexual harassment, and the science of gender and gender difference. We will examine the relationship of sexism to racism, heterosexism, and class exploitation, and investigate the role of the concept of difference in creating and maintaining structural inequalities.
SLAV Gender and War in Eastern Europe 206701 Simmons TBA
A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.
Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity
SOCY Gender and Sports 335801 Kim T/Th 3:00-4:15 pm
This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
PSYC
Sex and Aggression 338901 Gobrogge MWF 2:00-2:50 pm
Have you ever wondered why animals are attracted to the opposite/same sex, why they attack other animals, how they decide with whom to mate or whom to fight, and how drugs of abuse hijack natural rewards like mating, parenting, and aggression? In this course, we will study how genetic and neurochemical pathways direct males' and females' social motivation. We will cover topics such as sex-specific social behavior, same-sex sexual partnerships, monogamous rodents, neurochemistry of human pair-bonding and violence, and drug impairment of natural reward. In the last few weeks of the course we will discuss the way sex research is covered by the media and its social implications within the legal system such as the burgeoning field Neurocriminology.
Must have successfully completed PSYC2285 or PSYC2289
SOCY Sexuality and Society
337301 Ross M 4:30-6:50PM
This course explores societal understandings of sexuality through examining the ways that sexuality is promoted, repressed, and contested within American society. The topic will be surveyed in terms of social behavior, identity, culture, and power. Course readings will emphasize the influence of culture, institutions, and social interactions on sexuality, as well as explore the role of the state and the power of social norms in constructing sexuality.
SOCY
Inequality in America
107201
Spangler T Th 3-4:15PM
This course examines class inequity in American society. It not only describes how the rich, the poor, and the middle classes live, but also how they relate to one another. Topics include the strategies used by the rich for maintaining the status quo, the hopes cherished by the middle class for improving their position, and the obstacles that keep the poor in their place. Students can choose between readings that emphasize the dynamics of inequality as they are enacted by men or women, and by people of color or Caucasians. Satisfies Core requirement for: Social Science
THEO Contemporary Female Playwrights 338301 Wilner W/F 10:30-11:45 am
In a recent study called "The Count," conducted to determine who is being produced in American theatres, it was discovered during the past three years, only 22% were written by women. This is certainly not due to a lack of female playwrights, whose numbers equal those of male writers. Yet on American stages, four out of every five plays are written by men. In this class we'll address the lack of gender parity by reading and creatively responding to a wide range of female-written plays authored by a diverse range of female playwrights. Special guests from the professional Boston theatre community, including playwrights, dramaturgs, literary managers and others, will talk with us about their personal experiences in the theatre, as well as share with us the female-written plays that have had the greatest impact on them.
AADS Gender&Sexuality in African American History AADS334001 SUMMERS 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. MW
This course examines the intersections of gender and sexuality as both categories of identity and modes of power in the shaping of the historical experiences of African Americans. Through readings and lecture, we will explore three broad and interconnecting themes: how cultural understandings of race have impacted cultural understandings of gender and sexuality (and vice versa); how dominant cultural notions of gender and sexuality have underpinned relations of power between blacks and whites; and how gender and sexuality have shaped relationships within African American communities.
A&S Honors Do the Virtues Have Gender? HONR494001 BAYLES 6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. M
Description: Open to all BC undergraduates who have completed the core requirements in humanities and social sciences. 
The question of virtue lies at the heart of every civilization. So does the question of gender. Historically in the West, some virtues, such as bodily strength, courage in battle, self-control, rational intellect, and leadership, have been seen as masculine and superior to other virtues seen as feminine, such as modesty, industry, frugality, nurturing, and obedience. Is this view natural, rooted in biological sex; or is it conventional, part of a socially constructed system of gender roles? Further, how does the Western debate over these questions compare with the one currently raging in the Islamic world? These questions will be addressed through a wide range of readings, as well as films and other media, from both traditions.
COMM
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM 4451
Cuklanz T/Th 1:30-2:45 pm
This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
ENGL Reading the Body ENGL170201 TANNER 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. TTh

Description: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions 
This course will use literature to explore how the experience of embodiment shapes human identity in contexts including illness, obesity, poverty, disability, pregnancy, trauma, and aging. Through the analysis of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, we will consider the way that bodily experiences, material conditions, and cultural constructions of normalcy shape our understanding of identity in sickness and in health. In our class discussions, we will consider how literary representations of bodies in sickness and health might influence real world actions and interactions by establishing distance or constructing empathy through the act of reading.

Satisfies Core requirement for: Literature

ENGL Reading the Body ENGL170202 TANNER 6:00 p.m. - 7:50 p.m.T

Description: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions 
This course will use literature to explore how the experience of embodiment shapes human identity in contexts including illness, obesity, poverty, disability, pregnancy, trauma, and aging. Through the analysis of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, we will consider the way that bodily experiences, material conditions, and cultural constructions of normalcy shape our understanding of identity in sickness and in health. In our class discussions, we will consider how literary representations of bodies in sickness and health might influence real world actions and interactions by establishing distance or constructing empathy through the act of reading.

Satisfies Core requirement for: Literature

ENGL Celtic Heroic Age: Word and Image ENGL210101 O'LEARY 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. TTh
This course will explore the vernacular heroic literature of the insular Celts, that is, the Irish and the Welsh. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of Christian transmission on pagan source material, mythological survivals, the heroic worldview and value system, the nature of insular Celtic kingship, and the role of women in the heroic literature.
ENGL Human Rights & American Women's Writing, 1850-1920 ENGL401001 HARRISON-KAHAN 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. MWF

Description: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement 
This course focuses on American women writers who engaged questions of difference and justice and played pivotal roles in social reform, ranging from movements for women?s and indigenous rights to abolitionism and labor activism. How did nineteenth-century women use print culture as a forum for political debate and a means of democratic participation prior to the Nineteenth Amendment? How did women writers work within the sentimental tradition and contribute to new developments in science fiction, literary journalism, and realism? Authors include Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Maria Ruiz de Burton, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Zitkala-Sa, and Sarah Winnemucca.

Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

ENGL Women in Irish Literature Before 1900 ENGL401501 TAYLOR 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m. MWF
 Long before Joyce, there was Sydney Owenson?a writer with as much wit and even more audacity. This course explores pre-1900 Irish literature and culture from the unique perspective of the Irish woman. Women came in all shapes and forms in early Irish and English writing: queens, faeries, hags, vampires, and, most importantly, writers themselves. We will study how women formulated the Irish novel, asking questions like, what is the relationship between history and sexuality, imperialism and literature, myth and reality, the ?wild? native woman and the Landlord? Selected authors include: Sydney Owenson, Maria Edgeworth, W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Gaskell, as well as Irish language poets.
HIST Understanding Race, Gender and Violence HIST150301 MCGUFFEY  1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m. MWF
6:00 p.m. - 7:50 p.m. Th
Description: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems 
This course explores pressing problems of modern race and gender-based violence across the globe, including domestic violence, youth gangs, police violence, sexual assault, and genocide. Using both historical and sociological perspectives, we will examine the roots of such violence, the ways in which it has been expressed, the meanings attached to it, and its implications for society--particularly for racial/ethnic minorities, women, and LGBT people. The lab for the course will involve students in collaborative work with local anti-violence projects and organizations in the Boston area.
HIST Gender & Sexuality in African American History HIST448401 SUMMERS 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. MW
This course examines the intersections of gender and sexuality as both categories of identity and modes of power in the shaping of the historical experiences of African Americans. Through readings and lecture, we will explore three broad and interconnecting themes: how cultural understandings of race have impacted cultural understandings of gender and sexuality (and vice versa); how dominant cultural notions of gender and sexuality have underpinned relations of power between blacks and whites; and how gender and sexuality have shaped relationships within African American communities.
HIST Nannies, Maids & Mail Order Brides HIST445801 OH 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. TTh
Description: Not open to students who have taken HIST4457 
How does gender shape immigration and migration? How does it influence the lived experiences of migrants in the workplaces, families and communities? How does it shape migrants' perceptions and assimilation into U.S. society? How does it intersect with transnational practices and imaginaries? We will consider these questions through a study of migration to and within the United Sates from the late-19th-century to the present. The class considers a broad range of racial and ethnic groups while also attending to certain categories of migrants in an effort to understand the role of gender, race, and class in migration.
HIST The American Pacific HIST449801 OH 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. TTh
 This course explores the U.S.? role in constructing and perpetuating an American Pacific. How have Americans imagined, understood and interacted with the people and nations in and around the Pacific Ocean? How have relations with the nations of the Pacific Rim influenced Americans' view of themselves? How have economic, cultural and military activities contributed to America's rise as an imperialist power in this region? Rather than focusing on high politics and diplomacy, we will examine the American Pacific as a cultural, gendered, racial, military and political project, and explore themes such as empire, migration, race, sex and war.
POLI
Sex and the State in Latin America POLI4493 PURNELL M 5-7:30
Description: This course is by instructor's permission only. Please contact Professor Jennie Purnell at jennie.purnell@bc.edu, for information. This course is class restricted to seniors, juniors, and graduate students. 
This seminar explores the politics of gender and sexuality in Latin America. Topics to be addressed include family law and reproductive rights; women and revolution; women and the struggle for democracy; same-sex marriage; and the politics of gender identity.
POLI Gender and Politics POLI2314 SCHLOZMAN T/TH 9-10:15
 In this course we probe the role of women in American politics and the efforts that have been made on behalf of the collective political interests of women. We consider gender differences among citizens in public opinion, political participation, and vote choices and gender differences in the experiences and comportment of political leaders. Finally, we analyze the politics of a number of public policies having a special impact on women - among them, employment discrimination and other workplace issues, child care, equal opportunity in education, sexual harassment and sexual violence.
PSYC Interpersonal Violence PSYC333401 TISHELMAN 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. T
 This course will review research, assessment, treatment, and current controversies in the area of family violence, focusing on child sexual abuse, child physical abuse, and spousal abuse. The course will consist of a combination of a lecture and class discussion of the issues, including those related to memories of abuse, identification of abuse, and the legal, psychological, and social ramifications of extracting women and children from abusive homes.
RLRL Warrior Women SPAN660701 TANG 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m. MWF
Description: Conducted in Spanish
Fulfills post-1800 Peninsular requirement for major
 
This course examines the portrayal of strong female figures in Spanish literature and film from the nineteenth century to the present. Beginning with the writings of outspoken nineteenth-century authors such as Concepcin Arenal and Emilia Pardo Bazn, we move towards literary and filmic depictions of female involvement in the Spanish Civil War, and feminist narrative of recent decades from authors such as Montserrat Roig and Almudena Grandes. This course focuses on the variety of ways in which literature and film have defied gender stereotypes.
SOCY Understanding Race, Gender and Violence SOCY150401 MCGUFFEY 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. T

Description: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems 
This course explores pressing problems of modern race and gender-based violence across the globe, including domestic violence, youth gangs, police violence, sexual assault, and genocide. Using both historical and sociological perspectives, we will examine the roots of such violence, the ways in which it has been expressed, the meanings attached to it, and its implications for society--particularly for racial/ethnic minorities, women, and LGBT people. The lab for the course will involve students in collaborative work with local anti-violence projects and organizations in the Boston area.

Satisfies Core requirement for: History,Social Science

SOCY Studies in Crime and Social Justice SOCY331001 HEDGES 4:30 p.m. - 6:50 p.m. M
 Crime and social justice are considered not as distinct, but indivisible constructs produced through specific knowable institutional/personal practices. Course allows students to analyze perspectives on the process through which laws and criminal justice institutions have been/continue to be constructed; situate crime study within a "power reflexive" framework, while being attentive to the operation of race, class, and gender as features of contemporary social relations/institutions; discuss contemporary intellectual and practical efforts challenging existing conceptual and political structures relating to crime and social justice; and imagine/articulate institutions paralleling the vision of social justice developed throughout the course.
SOCY Deviance and Social Control SOCY103001 PFOHL 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. TTh

Description: Fulfills a requirement in the Women's Studies Program and the Pre-Law Program. 
This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms.

Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity,Social Science

SOCY Women and the Body SOCY108901 HESSE-BIBER 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. TTh

This course covers Western cultural pressures on women be super-slender. We analyze biological, sociological, and feminist perspectives on the body especially with regard to issues of beauty and body image and sexuality. We analyze how race, ethnicity and class intersect to create differences among womens relationship to their bodies. In what way do biological perspectives illuminate as well as cloud understanding of women's relationship to their bodies? We explore mass-mediated pressures on women's bodies through films, women's magazine, reality TV, and social networking sites. We examine the plastic surgery industry and the growing trend toward "designer bodies."

Satisfies Core requirement for: Social Science

SOCY Gender and Sports SOCY3358 KIM 10:30am - 11:45am TTh
 This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
THEO Spirituality and Sexuality THEO326101 MCDARGH 10:00 a.m. - 12:25 p.m. M
 How does our experience of ourselves as sexual beings open us to the experience of the holy, and conversely, how might our desire for God be intimately related to our sexual desire and longings? These are the questions that will be the focus of our work. Not a course on sexual ethics, this course is an exploration of the complex interrelationship of sexual and spiritual desire as both are reflected upon in the Christian spiritual tradition.
THEO HIV/AIDS and Ethics THEO549801 KEENAN 3:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. MW
 This course looks at how we can understand a bit better the ethics of public health through the lens of HIV/AIDS. There besides studying the virus itself, we examine the varied related ethical issues regarding stigma, prevention, research, gender inequity, economic disparities, local culture, religion, funding, and access.