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Vocation Resources

Campus Ministry

This page can help you narrow your vocational discernment by offering links to a number of religious communities in our area and across the United States.

The Catholic Religious Vocations Network’s VISION website offers a host of articles and resources on discernment and vocation. There is also a comprehensive Guide to Religious Ministries for Men and Women at religiousministries.com. The website includes links and contact information for many religious communities. 

Additionally, the Ignatius Press has a helpful document to understand the importance of the role and vocation of lay women and men in the church.

Interested in a vocation in the Archdiocese of Boston? Visit vocationsboston.org.


Kindly note: All information on the below Religious Communities is taken directly from their respective websites. If you are the vocations director of a religious community and want to feature a link to your page, please email us your information.

 

Religious Communities of Men

Founded almost half a millennium ago by the soldier-turned-mystic St. Ignatius of Loyola along with the First Companions, Jesuits seek to "find God in all things." Jesuit priests and brothers are involved in educational (including Boston College), pastoral and spiritual ministries around the world, and are committed to practicing a faith that promotes justice.

Learn more at beajesuit.org

The Assumptionists 
in the United States, are men of prayer and study 
living in fraternal community.
 Committing...to collaborative leadership and formation
 in the Church,
 [they] teach, preach, and foster education
 in all its forms. 
Impelled by the spirit of [their] founder, Father Emmanuel d’Alzon,
 “we go wherever God is threatened in man and
 man is threatened as image of God”
 (Rule of Life 4).

Learn more at assumption.us/vocations

Following the inspiration of St. Francis, the Capuchin brothers, both priest and lay, live and pray together in community while serving the poor and marginalized in Colorado, Kansas, Texas and the foreign missions.

Learn more at capuchins.org/vocations/

Edmund Rice Christian Brothers North America Province seeks to continue the mission of Blessed Edmund by responding to the needs of today’s most vulnerable members of society. They complete this work in a variety of settings, including Catholic schools and numerous outreach ministries to the most vulnerable. In these, and in parish, healthcare, counseling and other ministries, they follow the example of Blessed Edmund, who nurtured the dignity of each human person.

Learn more at edmundricebrothers.org

Holy Cross priests and brothers are called upon to be educators in the faith, who with a preferential option for the poor, educate both the mind and heart principally in the fields of education, parish and mission.

Learn more at holycrossusa.org/vocations/

Carmelites strive to live a zealous life of allegiance to Jesus for the salvation of souls, in the contemplative and missionary spirit of St. Teresa of Jesus and St. John of the Cross.

Learn more at discalcedcarmelitefriars.com/vocations

The heart of the Society of Saint Edmund’s mission is serving where the need is greatest, a credo that has led to its four core ministries: Social Justice, Education, Spiritual Renewal and Pastoral Ministry. Edmundites have an active presence at Saint Michael’s College (Colchester, Vermont); outreach missions that help the poor such as Edmundite Missions (Selma, AL); retreat centers at Saint Anne’s Shrine (Isle La Motte, Vermont); and in parishes throughout Vermont and Alabama.

Learn more at sse.org/vocation

Glenmary Home Missioners, founded in 1939, is a Catholic society of priests and brothers who, along with coworkers, are dedicated to establishing a Catholic presence in rural areas and small towns of the United States where the Catholic Church is not yet effectively present.

Learn more at glenmary.org/vocations

The Marist Brothers are an international religious community of more than 3,000 Catholic Brothers dedicated to making Jesus known and loved through the education of young people, especially those most neglected. In the United States there are more than 140 Marist Brothers living in 32 communities across eight states. They minister in school settings, parishes, retreats, spiritual accompaniments, at-risk youth settings, young adult ministries, and overseas missions.

Learn more at maristbr.com/calledtobeabrother

The Norbertine life is founded on the idea of communio which is celebrated through the concepts expressed in the Rule of St. Augustine, the Acts of the Apostles and the Day of the Pentecost. The very heart of the vision of the Norbertine community is strengthening the friendship of the members of the Christian community with God and with one another.

Learn more at norbertinecommunity.org/vocations

Benedictine monks lives in a monastery with other monks; praying, working, and pursuing hobbies and interest, together as a continuous pursuit of God. They take vows of stability to community, conversion according to the monastic order of life, and to the promise of obedience.

Learn more at abbeyvocations.org (St. John’s Abbey) & portsmouthabbeymonastery.org (Portsmouth Abbey)

Like their founder, St. Paul of the Cross, Passionists keep alive Jesus’ message in a world searching for meaning, freedom and human dignity. They minister by means that are old and new, including popular preaching, spiritual retreats, parishes, study and research, and mass media including television and the internet.

Learn more at beapassionist.org

The Missionary Society of St. Paul the Apostle (“The Paulist Fathers”) is a community of Catholic priests who share the Gospel through mission preaching, media, campus ministries, parishes, downtown centers, the arts and more. They focus on evangelization (reaching out), reconciliation (bringing peace) and ecumenical and interfaith relations (seeking unity).

Learn more at paulist.org/vocation

The Salesians of Don Bosco’s mission is to evangelize and educate young people, especially those who are poor and at risk.

Learn more at salesians.org/become-a-salesian

The Cistercian Order of the Strict Observance, popularly known as Trappists, are set apart from the actions and trends of most of their neighbors, and live a contemplative life, dedicating themselves to the praise and worship of God in a hidden life within a monastery. Following Saint Benedict’s sixth century Rule for Monasteries, the monks live in silence and solitude, in prayer and penitence, thus rendering God “a service that is at once humble and noble.”

Learn more at spencerabbey.org/becoming-a-monk

 

Religious Communities of Women

Carmelites strive to live a zealous life of allegiance to Jesus for the salvation of souls, in the contemplative and missionary spirit of St. Teresa of Jesus and St. John of the Cross.

Learn more at carmelitesofboston.org/vocation

The Dominican Sisters of Mary’s foundation draws from the dynamism of the “new,” the vitality of the New Evangelization, and the rich heritage of the “old,” the cherished tradition of the Order of Preachers.

Learn more at sistersofmary.org

In the spirit of St. Marguerite d’Youville, their foundress, the Grey Nuns of the Sacred Heart strive to be signs of God’s unconditional love as they collaborate to create a more just and compassionate world.

Learn more at greynun.org/join-us/our-invitation

The Holy Union Sisters are an international congregation of Catholic women religious who minister on four continents. They wear a cross, with the Latin words Sancta Unio inscribed on the front, as a symbol of their internationality. Their founder, Jean Baptiste Debrabant, wrote in a letter to the sisters in 1842, of the significance of their name: "You have received that name only that you may form all together a union of heart, mind and affection in Jesus and Mary." That union is brought to the world by working among different cultures, ethnic groups, the deprived and marginalized.

Learn more at holyunionsisters.org/belonging

Medical Missionaries of Mary is an international congregation of women religious, founded by Mother Mary Martin in Nigeria, in 1937. Desiring to share Christ's healing love, it brings health services to people of different cultures where human needs are great. MMMs are serving in 13 countries around the world. Sisters come from 20 countries and are trained in a variety of health-related professions. With Mary as their model, special concern is given to the care of mothers and children and the fostering of family life.

Learn more at mmmworldwide.org

The Poor Clare Sisters are follow in the footsteps of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi. They live the Gospel together in an enclosed contemplative community according to the Rule written by St. Clare.

Learn more at poorclarenunsandover.wordpress.com

The Society of the Sacred Heart is an international congregation of Catholic women religious. Founded in 1800 by St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, the Society of the Sacred Heart has more than 2,200 members in provinces in 41 countries. Members of the Society are known as Religious of the Sacred Heart - or RSCJ, for Religieuses du Sacré-Cœur de Jésus, the name in French. Its charism is to make known the love of the Heart of Jesus in the world. Religious of the Sacred Heart live out their vocations in the service of education; all service is done with the heart of an educator.

Learn more at rscj.org/vocations

The School Sisters of Notre Dame work to “Transform the World through Education.” The first sisters arrived in North America in 1847. School Sisters of Notre Dame, now living and ministering on five continents, have their Generalate in Rome, Italy, and continue to “share in Christ’s mission to proclaim the good news of God’s reign.”

Learn more at ssnd.org/become-sister

Sisters of Charity – Halifax strive to show forth the love of God by serving those in need in a spirit of humility, simplicity, and charity according to the circumstances of the times.

Learn more at schalifax.ca/associates

Sisters of the IHM have worked to meet the critical needs of people throughout the United States and in Latin America. Living the vows of chastity, poverty and obedience as signs of hope to the world, they are especially committed to works that manifest special concern, service and advocacy for the economically poor and spiritually neglected.

Learn more at sistersofihm.org

Inspired by the life of Jesus and their founder Catherine McAuley, the Sisters of Mercy envision a just world for people who are poor, sick and uneducated. The Sisters of Mercy are women of faith who commit their lives to God and their resources to serve, advocate and pray for those in need around the world.

Learn more at sistersofmercy.org/become-a-sister

St. Julie Billiart founded the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur to make known God's goodness, especially among the most abandoned people and those living in poverty.

Learn more at sndden.org/get-involved/become-a-sister

Sisters of the Presentation work in education, pastoral ministry, health care, and social services in California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Washington, D.C. There are some 3,000 Presentation Sisters and Presentation Associates worldwide.

Learn more at sistersofthepresentation.org/vocations

Sisters of Providence (of Holyoke) are a community of women called to reveal the loving care of Providence through tender and compassionate ministries of hope and healing.

Learn more at http://www.sisofprov.org/html/become.html

The Sisters of Saint Joseph live a spirituality that starts with “feet in the street.” They are attentive to the Spirit nurtured in contemplation on the mystery of God active in our lives. It was the desire of Jean Pierre Médaille, SJ, and their founding sisters that they have no special work other than the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, to do “whatever is possible for women to do.” They strive in every aspect of their lives, to be on fire with the gospel, to be for others a visible sign of God’s presence and inclusive love, and be devoted to the needs of ordinary people.

Learn more at csjboston.org (Boston) & ssjphila.org (Philadelphia)


Spiritual Resources

America Magazine
America magazine is the leading Catholic journal of opinion in the United States. First published in 1909, America magazine is known across the Catholic world for its unique brand of opinion and analysis. From theology and spirituality to politics, international relations, arts and letters, and the economy and social justice, America’s coverage spans the globe, telling the stories that matter most to the church and the world.

Visit americamagazine.org

Busted Halo
Busted Halo is a unique media resource that utilizes a relevant and accessible voice to help people understand the Catholic faith, put it into practice in their everyday lives, and share it with others. Busted Halo is a ministry of The Paulist Fathers. The Paulist Fathers are a religious order of Roman Catholic priests — the first to be founded by an American citizen — whose mission territory is the United States.

Visit bustedhalo.com

The Jesuit Post
TJP is a project of Jesuits in formation. Nearly all of the contributors are not-yet-ordained Jesuits studying theology or philosophy, or working in our Jesuit ministries. Several recently ordained Jesuits also contribute to the work. On the whole, about 50 Jesuits are currently involved in the project. In addition to the website, TJP maintains a very active social media presence, contributing to the web’s best conversations about faith and culture — whether it touches on politics, theology, Church news, debates about belief and secularity, or really anything else.

Visit thejesuitpost.org