Skip to main content

Secondary navigation:

international programs

Boston Intercultural Skills Conference (BISC)

office of international programs

CBS Nepal - Tbt Pecha study w monk

The Integration of Intercultural Learning at Home and Abroad

Friday, February 24, 2017 from 9:00AM - 3:30PM
Corcoran Commons, Boston College Chestnut Hill Campus

Today’s colleges and universities are increasingly wrestling with issues of diversity and how to support positive dialogue surrounding these complex issues on campus. Hosted by Boston College, the 2017 Boston Intercultural Skills Conference (BISC) will bring together faculty and staff striving to forge more inclusive campus communities both domestically and abroad. The conference will explore the ways in which intercultural competence supports inclusion.

Dialogue across traditional university silos will enrich the conversation as we work towards the common goal of providing resources that enable faculty and staff to navigate increasingly diverse campus communities, support students of all backgrounds, and prepare students to succeed in an increasingly interconnected world. 

The conference is intended for faculty leading short-term study abroad programs, international education professionals, and other university staff and faculty interested in the internationalization of campus communities and promoting inclusive excellence.

8:30-9:00 am : Breakfast 

9:00-9:15 am: Opening remarks

9:15-10:30 am
: Keynote address: Dr. Alma Clayton-Pedersen

10:30-10:45 am: Coffee break and transition to breakout sessions

10:45 am-12:00 pm: Breakout sessions

12:00-1:15 pm: Lunch and Student Panel, moderated by Alma Clayton-Pedersen

1:30-2:45 pm: Breakout sessions

3:00-3:30 pm: Concluding remarks

8:30-9:00 am: Breakfast 

9:00-9:15 am: Opening remarks

9:15-10:30
 am: Keynote address: Alma Clayton-Pedersen

10:30-10:45 am: Coffee break and transition to breakout sessions

10:45 am-12:00 pm: Breakout sessions

12:00-1:15 pm: Lunch and Student Panel, moderated by Alma Clayton-Pedersen

1:30-2:45 pm: Breakout sessions

3:00-3:30 pm: Concluding remarks
file

Dr. Alma R. Clayton-Pedersen is CEO of Emeritus Consulting Group, and an Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) senior scholar consulting on programs that prepare faculty, administrators and institutions for the future of higher education. While vice president for education and institutional renewal at AAC&U she led the establishment of Inclusive Excellence as a national imperative. She joined AAC&U after more than 15 years at Vanderbilt University in varied roles. She has co-authored many publications including the seminal work, Enacting Diverse Learning Environments: Improving the Climate for Racial/Ethnic Diversity in Higher Education. She was co-PI and director of AAC&U’s Preparing Critical Faculty for the Future (PCFF) program (2010-2015) and lead author of Preparing Critical Faculty for the Future: Enlisting the Voices of STEM Women Faculty of Color (2016), Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change (2009), and Making Excellence Inclusive in Education and Beyond(2008). She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and both a M.Ed. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.

Alma R. Clayton-Pedersen is CEO of Emeritus Consulting Group, and an Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) senior scholar consulting on programs that prepare faculty, administrators and institutions for the future of higher education. While vice president for education and institutional renewal at AAC&U she led the establishment of Inclusive Excellence as a national imperative. She joined AAC&U after more than 15 years at Vanderbilt University in varied roles. She has co-authored many publications including the seminal work, Enacting Diverse Learning Environments: Improving the Climate for Racial/Ethnic Diversity in Higher Education. She was co-PI and director of AAC&U’s Preparing Critical Faculty for the Future (PCFF) program (2010-2015) and lead author of Preparing Critical Faculty for the Future: Enlisting the Voices of STEM Women Faculty of Color (2016), Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change (2009), and Making Excellence Inclusive in Education and Beyond(2008). She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and both a M.Ed. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.

10:45 am - 12:00 pm

Critical Approaches to Intercultural Competence in the Classroom
In this workshop, we will address traditional perspectives on intercultural competence through the lens of ‘critical’ approaches such as anti-racist pedagogy. What can we learn from both bodies of literature and how can these insights be useful for our courses and programs? See relevant slideshows, materials and handouts from the event. 

Best Practices in Integrating International Students into Campus Life and the Classroom
This session will present two innovative best practices for integrating international students into campus life and the classroom by seasoned practitioners. The first, from Brown University, will discuss the impact of the current US climate on international student experiences and effective strategies for ensuring their voices are heard on campus. The second, from Boston College/Bentley University, will discuss the growing necessity for intercultural competency skills by professors in order to enhance learning and promote inclusion of international students in the classroom. Read relevant breakout materials.

Getting Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable: Guiding Emerging Adults Abroad Through the Lens of Emotional Resilience
This session will offer an often missed opportunity to bridge and integrate a long-standing gap in training and practices related to supporting emerging adults through the emotional process of studying abroad. Dr. Abarbanel will share her idea of an “Emotional Passport,” a set of skills required for resilient learning communities during culture shifts, focusing on all students, with the goal of having intentional practices to integrate a conversation about emotional health within the full community. Read relevant breakout materials, handouts and pamphelts.

1:30 - 2:45 pm

What Does Study Abroad Mean—And Why Should It Matter?
We’re up against a widening cultural gap between ourselves and our students. We increasingly look to theory and research to inform our intercultural training—to the application of insights that tell us that students develop interculturally to the extent that they become aware of how they make meaning, how others make meaning, and what they can do when they and others make meaning differently. Most of our students, however, remain largely unmoved and unconvinced by our attempts to apply theory and research. This session explores this “meaning-making” gap in study abroad; participating educators will leave with training activities they can use in helping their own students develop interculturally. Read relevant breakout materials.

Supporting Intercultural Learning: Challenges and Opportunities for Senior Leadership
As senior administrators in international education, we often face multiple priorities competing for our time, resources, and attention. For this session, we invite you to come together to explore the following questions and share your own questions and experiences:

What can senior administrators do to encourage intercultural learning in education abroad? Is intercultural learning important for staff and faculty? How do we leverage the intercultural learning of study returnees to enhance inclusion on our campus? How do we support diversity & inclusion efforts as international educators?

Students at the Margins:  Making Study Abroad a Possibility
This panel session will explore the idea that it is important for study abroad offices to understand the experiences of students at the margins to inform their recruitment and services. Ines Maturana Sendoya will discuss the experiences of black students at a predominantly white institution and implications for study abroad. Karen Arnold will situate study abroad issues within her longitudinal research on the college experiences of first-generation, low-income students. April Stroud will present findings from her research on factors that influence college student participation in study abroad. She will identify populations that have decreased odds of participation, discussing both implications and recommendations for institutions of higher education to make study abroad an opportunity for more students.The session will conclude with a discussion about ways in which we can identify and support marginalized students. Read relevant breakout materials.

 

Critical Approaches to Intercultural Competence in the Classroom

Stacy Grooters is the Director of Faculty Programs in BC’s Center for Teaching Excellence, where she is responsible for developing opportunities for instructors at BC—both faculty and graduate students—to reflect together on their teaching. She came to BC in 2015 from Stonehill College, where she was the Founding Director of the Center for Teaching Learning and an Assistant Professor of English and Gender & Sexuality Studies. She currently serves on the board of directors of the national organization of teaching centers, the POD Network, and her most recent publication examines the POD Network's scholarly engagement with diversity in its publications and conferences.

Matthew Goode manages faculty workshops and programs in the Center for Teaching Excellence at Boston College. Having earned a Ph.D. in comparative and international development education at the University of Minnesota, his research focuses on intercultural competence in teaching and learning (both at home and abroad) and he has published articles investigating the roles of faculty and staff in international education. Matthew has partnered with faculty members in leading short-term study abroad programs and he serves as a cross-cultural trainer working with faculty, staff, and students. He is a qualified administrator of the Intercultural Development Inventory.

Best Practices in Integrating International Students into Campus Life and the Classroom

Shontay Delalue is the Vice Provost for Global Engagement at Brown University, where her professional work focuses on areas of cultural awareness, international and race relations, and racial identity development. Prior to arriving at Brown, she worked at the University of Alaska Southeast as Director of Admissions, as a college counselor at The Met High School in Providence, and as the Director of the Intercultural Center at Bryant University. At Brown, she directs the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship within the Dean of the College, and, from within the Office of Global Engagement, provides strategic leadership in support of international students at all levels of the University. Shontay earned her B.A. in Communication and Masters in Education from the University of Maine and a Ph.D. in Education through a joint program of the University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College. 

Adrienne Nussbaum has 33 years of experience in international higher education. She is currently the Director/Assistant Dean of the Boston College Office of International Students and Scholars. Adrienne’s teaching experience includes 15 years in the Global Studies department at Bentley University as well as courses at Tufts University, Lesley University, and Boston College. She has done trainings and consulting for schools and organizations both in higher education and at the K-12 level, as well as numerous presentations at regional and national conference of NAFSA, NASPA, and the International Careers Consortium. She is also a Qualified Administrator for the Intercultural Development Inventory. Adrienne received her B.A. from Tufts University and her M.A. in Intercultural Relations from Lesley University.

Getting Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable: Guiding Emerging Adults Abroad Through the Lens of Emotional Resilience

Janice Abarbanel served for 3 ½ years as NYU Berlin’s onsite psychologist and health educator. Her interest lies in the interface between studying abroad, the life stage of Emerging Adulthood, and emotional health—an outcome of her work as a US Peace Corps Volunteer and through her clinical practice in Washington DC.  A graduate of Harvard and trained as a clinical psychologist in New Haven and Los Angeles, she now writes and speaks about the “Emotional Passport”, training study abroad staff, college counselors, and faculty in the US and abroad about how emotional skill-building and resilience supports academic success and personal development. Dr. Abarbanel recently served as the on board psychologist with the Semester at Sea Spring 2016 academic voyage.

Celeste Wells is a professor in Boston College's Communication department. She joined the department in 2010 after earning her doctorate from the University of Utah. Dr. Wells' research emphasizes the study of worker identity, immigration, nation, race, and gender. Additionally, Dr. Wells writes about teaching pedagogy with an aim to develop students' love of learning so that it extends beyond their undergraduate experience. 

What Does Study Abroad Mean—And Why Should It Matter?

Mick Vande Berg, now Principal at MVB Associates, has held leadership positions at several institutions and organizations that are unusually committed to international and intercultural education. He is a senior faculty member at the Summer and Winter Institutes for Intercultural Communication (SIIC and WIIC) and teaches intercultural courses, seminars and workshops in many parts of the world. His publications include Student learning abroad: What our students are doing, what they’re not, and what we can do about it. A founding board member of the Forum on Education Abroad, Dr. Vande Berg is a 2012 recipient of the Forum’s Peter A. Wollitzer award and the 2014 IDI Intercultural Competence award.

Supporting Intercultural Learning: Challenges and Opportunities for Senior Leadership

Anthony L. Pinder serves as the inaugural Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs for Internationalization and Global Engagement at Emerson College. He is responsible for managing and building on all of the College’s international operations, and he established Emerson’s Global Pathways Program, which includes 15 faculty-led education abroad programs around the world. Dr. Pinder received his doctorate in educational leadership and higher education administration from Clark Atlanta University, his M.A. in international economics and Latin American studies from The Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and his B.A. in finance from Morehouse College.

Amir Reza is Vice Provost for International & Multicultural Education at Babson College. He has served on regional leadership boards for NAFSA and is active in AIEA.  He has presented at numerous national and international conferences on international education. His research focus is on internationalization, and intercultural development. He holds a B.A. and M.Ed. from the University of Maine, and a doctorate in Higher Education Administration from Boston College’s Center for International Higher Education.

J. Scott Van Der Meid is Associate Dean of Study Abroad at Brandeis University. He has worked in international higher education for over 20 years, and he has presented both nationally and internationally on various topics within higher education, including under-represention in study abroad with a focus on the influencing factors for participation of Asian Americans and GLBT students. He has served on several national advisory boards and chaired numerous groups within both NAFSA and the Forum on Education Abroad. Scott received his B.A. in History and German Literature from Allegheny College and his M.A. in Intercultural Relations from Lesley University.

Students at the Margins:  Making Study Abroad a Possibility

Karen Arnold is Associate Professor of Higher Education at Boston College. She is the author of books and articles in the fields of college access, talent development and longitudinal study methods. Her most recent book is The Ecology of College Readiness, published in December 2012 by Jossey-Bass. Her current work on college access is funded by the Department of Education (IES) and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Dr. Arnold has served as Vice President for Student Services at Reed College, Visiting Fellow at the Murray Research Center for the Study of Lives at Radcliffe College, and Visiting Scholar at the Oxford Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies at the University of Oxford. Her recent international work in higher education includes teaching and faculty development in China, Brazil, and Saudi Arabia. 

Inés Maturana Sendoya has been Director of the Thea Bowman AHANA (African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American) and Intercultural Center (BAIC) at Boston College since 2006. She joined Boston College in June 2002 as Associate Director of BAIC. Before joining Boston College she was Undergraduate Program Director and Director of the Educational Opportunities Program in the College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston. 

Dr. Maturana Sendoya received her doctoral degree in Higher Education Administration from the University of Massachusetts Boston, her M.A. in Intercultural Relations from Lesley University, and her B.A. in Modern Languages from the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. 

April Stroud worked in the Netherlands for five years before joining the Education Abroad staff at UMass Amherst. She has over 10 years of experience advising students on study abroad opportunities in the UK, Ireland, and the Netherlands. As the Director of Curriculum for Education Abroad, she leads the office on academic initiatives including curricular integration, program evaluation, assessment, and certificate programs. April holds an Ed.D. in Educational Policy & Leadership from UMass Amherst and has published in the Journal of Studies in International Education about factors that influence student intent and participation in study abroad.

Online registration is now closed. If you are interested in attending the conference, please email erin.shevlin@bc.edu to be placed on the waiting list. 

The conference will be held on the Chestnut Hill campus of Boston College in the Heights Room at Corcoran Commons. Click here for directions to BC and a campus map.

Please note that visitor parking is only available in on-campus garages. The closest garage to the event is the Commonwealth Avenue Garage, located at 2599 Commonwealth Ave, Chestnut Hill, MA. Full full details on parking rates and hours, please see the Visitor Parking website