Online Programs Summer 2021

COVID-19 Update

Though BCE is typically offered as a residential experience, out of an abundance of caution and a desire to keep our students and our community safe, for the summer of 2021 the Boston College Experience will once again be offered in an entirely virtual format.  We have built upon the success of our online offerings last summer, transitioning a few more of our residential programs online and will be expanding our online offerings for both credit and on-credit courses. Check out our summer offerings below to see what interests you.

 


 

Explore your interests. Discover new ones.

BCE is offering 12 different two-week, non-credit online programs this summer covering areas such as business and leadership, economics, nonprofit management for social justice, intro to psych and applied neuroscience, college and creative writing and arts and history. The two week programs are open to rising sophomores, juniors and seniors and will run multiple times over an eight-week span. 

We are excited to announce that this summer, Boston College will offer an online version of its flagship Honors Program. This program is open to rising high school juniors and seniors who meet the academic qualifications necessary to participate. Students admitted into the online Boston College Honors Program may earn college credit by enrolling in up to two (2) options from a carefully curated list of undergraduate course scheduled to run online through the Boston College's Summer Session in the summer of 2021. 

Please see the tabs below for more information on how to apply, admission requirements, costs and other participant related details.

"Out of Class" Virtual Calendar of Activities

In addition to participation in either Boston College Honors or any of the two week online programs, enrolled BCE students will have access to a calendar of virtual events throughout the eight-week term. These virtual events, which will typically run live for 1-2 hours, will cover college prep and social and cultural enrichment topics and include presentations from BC admissions, Student and Residential Life and Financial Aid representatives. There will be seminars on personal finance and writing a strong college essay and other related college preparatory content. There will also be a wide variety of personal enrichment options in areas such as history, creative arts, leadership and innovation and digital media to name a few!

As the summer gets closer we will post the activities on this website so please check back regularly!

 

Boston College Experience 2021 Session Dates


Two-Week, Non-Credit Course Session Dates:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13


Seven-Week, Boston College Honors Dates:

Boston College Summer Term 1: Wednesday, May 19 - Friday, July 2

Boston College Summer Term 2: Wednesday, July 7 - Friday, August 20

*Please pay careful attention to the sessions the courses you are interested in are offered. Not all courses are available in all sessions.


Two-Week Online Courses


 

Courses and Details

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See below for details on the indivdual programs. Please pay attention to the sessions in which the program of your choice is running. Not all programs run in every session. 

Please Note: You must have access to a GMAIL account to participate in the two-week, non-credit programs.

Introduction to Concepts In Psychology Seminar

Psychology is the study of Mind. A social science that exploded into global consciousness throughout the 21st century, psychology continues to shape our experience within society and provide insights into the human potential for growth, healing, and understanding. The three pillars of psychology (i.e., neuroscience, anthropology, and philosophy), are integrated throughout the course activities and discussions, while incorporating a justice-oriented lens that seeks to understand the ways that privilege and power can inform clinical research and practice. Participants will consider the depth and rigor required of psychological researchers and clinicians to answer such questions as:

  • Is personality predicted by our genes? To what extent are we shaped by our family environment or culture?
  • How do discriminatory attitudes form? Why do people sometimes prefer their own group, and fear the other?
  • What happens following a traumatic brain injury? How can we help people (e.g., athletes, veterans) in their recovery?
  • What are moods? Why do some people struggle with depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder and how can we help?

This course covers three units over two weeks:

  1. History of Psychology, spanning the ancient world through modern-day neuroscience
  2. Clinical Skills, in which students learn and apply approaches to psychotherapy
  3. Psychopathology, in which students gain hands-on experience with diagnosis and assessment. This unit also includes a Special Topic in Neuropsychology, which explores assessment and intervention approaches for neurological conditions.

    Through participating in this course, students will gain a comprehensive introduction into the field, its career opportunities, and learn about themselves in the process. They will emerge with advanced knowledge from an immersive training comprised of fun and accessible lectures, activities/projects, and film.

Faculty: Professor Sam Gable, Ph.D.

Course Participation Requirements: Students will be expected to complete 3 hours per day for class work, including recorded and live lectures, reading, and homework. Plan for two 1.5-hour synchronous sessions per week.

Session dates available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Books required: TBD

Virtual Session times:

  • Week 1: Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
  • Week 2: Tuesday 1:00 -3:00 p.m., Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Creative Writing Workshop

Through the study of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, students will explore their own unique voices and the diverse voices of published writers. Students will identify and analyze different styles of writing and collect a "toolbox" of craft techniques that they will put into practice by writing their own original creative pieces. Classes will consist of reading, discussion, writing exercises, and writing workshops in which students will have the opportunity to give and receive constructive feedback on their work. As a seminar capstone, students will have the opportunity to present their work in an online reading.

Faculty: Professors Allison Adair, PhD and Christopher Boucher, PhD

Course Participation Requirements: 2-3 hours of asynchronous work per day; two additional 1- to 1.5-hour synchronous sessions (one small-group, one large-group) per week. 

Session dates available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Books Required: The Poet's Companion' (Addonizio & Laux - copies cost $2.50-13.50 on Amazon); 'The Lie That Tells the Truth' (Dufresne - costs $7-15.25 on Amazon)

Virtual Session times: Fridays 12:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Business & Leadership Institute (BLI)

Through readings, dialogue, and project-based learning, this course seeks to develop an understanding of the business and leadership components that participants will study and utilize in their college and early professional careers.  The Business and Leadership Institute (BLI) operates in a collaborative virtual environment; instead of traditional classroom lectures, participants will be introduced to the fundamentals of business and leadership through activities such as:

  • Case study analysis
  • Video analysis
  • Expert speakers
  • Small group collaborative work

The BLI will culminate with the creation of a group business plan; storyboarding of the “big idea”; and presentation of their start-up concept to a panel of “Project Funders”

Please note: this course does not focus on any specific business functional area but instead provides a broad overview of the concept of business and leadership and is geared towards students interested in pursuing business majors and/or leadership in organizational settings of all kinds.

Faculty: 

Professor Bill Boozang, EdD

Professor Ifa Kahn, Phd

Professor Courtney Cole, PhD

Professor Dawn Mackiewecz, EdD

Course Participation Requirements: Students expected to dedicated 2-3 hours per day to asynchronous work and attend a weekly live session on Fridays from 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST.

Sessions Available: 

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Books Required: None

Virtual Session times: OH: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. EST on Wednesdays, live sessions Fridays from 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. EST.

Beyond the Rhetoric: How to Really Support Nonprofit’s and Social Justice Movements

Nonprofit organizations are tax-exempt entities guided by their mission. While there are different types of nonprofit and non-governmental organizations such as education and charity, these organizations must raise funds and use them to support their mission. This course explores the structural, legal, financial and organizational components necessary to go beyond the rhetoric. In the context of social justice movements centered on eliminating poverty, racism, discrimination, and the like, this course is ideal for individuals interested in learning how to start and fund a nonprofit organization and/or those interested in working or volunteering for a nonprofit organization. This course embodies theory, practice, and experiential activities coupled with real-world cases to augment existing knowledge and experience. Course topics include nonprofit legal governance and board issues, financial management, grant writing, fundraising and development and advocacy.

Faculty: Professor Rick Arrowood, JD, DLP

Course Participation Requirements:  Bi-weekly one hour live meetings with additional required asynchronous activities as assigned. Approximately 10-15 hours per week total engagement. 

Sessions Available: 

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Books Required: None

Virtual Session times: Tuesday or Wednesday and Friday 7 p.m. EST

Applied Neuropsychology

Our frontal lobes house crucial brain circuitry responsible for complex daily functioning, including abstraction, humor and creativity, mental calculations, learning, and impulse control. In life, they are the last to develop fully (wait until you’re 25 years old!) and the first to go as we age, and yet society heaps greater and greater demand on these networks in the way we approach school and careers. For this reason, emerging neuropsychologists and therapists must learn how to merge cutting edge science with effective counseling techniques in order to help people “learn” their own brain and achieve excellence in this competitive world.

This course will teach neuropsychological and functional neuroanatomical concepts as they are applied in counseling and rehabilitation for young people and adults. In addition to learning about specific psychiatric and neurological diagnoses affecting cognition, the course takes a sociohistorical view of the changing nature of school and work that has resulted in increased competitiveness and demands in our lives in the areas of thinking, leisure, and relationships.

Specific topics covered include:

*ADHD, autism, and daily functioning

*Dyslexia and other learning challenges

*Neural correlates of depression and anxiety

*Counseling with Motivational Interviewing

*Neuroplasticity and Rehabilitation

*School and work in the 21st century

Faculty: Professor Sam Gable, Ph.D.

Course Participation Requirments: Students will be expected to complete 3 hours per day for class work, including recorded and live lectures, reading, and homework. Plan for two 1.5-hour synchronous sessions per week.

Sessions Available: 

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Books required: TBD

Virtual Session times:

  • Week 1: Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
  • Week 2: Tuesday 1:00 -3:00 p.m., Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Writing in the Field

This advanced topic workshop invites students to live the life of a creative writer--out of the classroom and out in the bustling world around us. How can local environments offer new ideas for writing, or serve as vessels for stories we need to tell? Join Professors Adair and Boucher as they conduct virtual classes on location at specific Boston-area sites, introducing writers to the possibilities of writing “in the field.” We’ll also visit with celebrated contemporary poets and fiction writers, practice various methods for revising promising drafts, and learn more about literary journals and the process of publishing.. 

Faculty: Professors Allison Adair, PhD and Christopher Boucher, PhD

Course Participation Requirements: 2-3 hours per day of online asynchronous work; 2 additional 1- to 1.5-hour remote synchronous sessions with one or both instructors

Session dates available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Required Books: Details forthcoming; students will purchase guest writers' books for study and discussion. (Costs likely to be $10-15 per book, for a total of $20-30 per session.)

Virtual Session times: Fridays 12:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Sports Management Institute

Participants will learn about the Sports Industry and the opportunities and career options available in the sports industry. Through a variety of activities including readings, viewings, short lectures, and guest speakers, students will be introduced to the cultural, economic, and social impact of sports in America and internationally.  Students will learn how to identify and analyze resources for clarification of industry trends, opportunities, and challenges to entry in the sports sector. The course will culminate in a final project.

Topics covered include:

  • Marketing and promotions
  • Merchandizing and Licensing
  • Social and Cultural Impact of Sports
  • Player Formation and Development
  • Sports Governance issues

Faculty: Professor Reginald Grant, MEd

Sessions Available: 

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Course Participation Requirements: Bi-weekly one hour live meetings with additional required asynchronous actvities as assigned. Approximately 10-15 hours per week total engagement. 

Books Required: None

Virtual Session times: Fridays 9 a.m. PST, 12 p.m. EST

Government, Globalism, Capitalism: A History

This course involves a comprehensive survey of the connection between politics, economics, and internationalism, and the effects of this connection in the development of World History. In particular, the course takes an in-depth look at the beginnings of capitalism in the sixteenth century; at how capitalism affected, and was affected by, the growth of the nation state; and at how capitalism became the dominant economic, social, and, in some cases, the religious belief system for many countries, particularly those in the West. We will also look at how the concept of capitalism has fared against global challenges from newer political/economic/religious ideologies such as Socialism, Marxism, Communism, Fascism, and international terrorism. And, finally, we hope to identify just how the theory and practice of global capitalism has proven to be so resilient, despite its evident flaws, to the extent that it remains one of the major forms of economic, cultural, social, and political systems practiced by many countries in the world today. Throughout this course, issues of race, gender, class, nationality, religion, and age will be to the fore, as we strive to discover how the world came to be as it is today.

Faculty: Professor Michael Paul

Course Participation Requirements: Synchronous meetings twice per week on Tuesday and Friday from 2:00-3:00 PM EST. All meetings will be recorded and available for students who cannot attend live. Asynchronous: eight hours per week, including virtual Museum tours, readings, etc.

Sessions Available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Session 3: Monday, July 19- Friday, July 30

Required Books: Olaudeh Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudeh Equiano, Bedford/St. Martins, 1996 ISBN: 0-312-11127-4

Virtual Session times: Tuesdays and Fridays at 2 p.m.

Psychology of the Arts

Think back to our cavemen ancestors – their lives weren’t easy, constantly on the lookout for food, shelter, and safety from predators. Yet, between those stressful tasks, evidence shows that these people participated in the arts. They painted on cave walls, made and wore jewelry of shells and rocks, and played music on flutes carved from bird bones. Why did they make time for this? The arts (music, visual arts, dance, and theater) must be important to human beings in ways we still can’t completely understand. Fast forward to today, and there are still questions to be asked:

·  Why do we spend so much time flipping through Snapchat filters?

·  Why do we listen to sad music when we’re already feeling sad?

·  Why do we like being scared when watching horror movies, but not in real life?

In this class, we’ll learn to think like a research psychologist (observe evidence, ask questions, test hypotheses, analyze and present data) using the lens of artistic behavior. We’ll read research, design, and execute studies, and present our findings about why people sing, dance, paint, and act. Students should be prepared to be active participants in class (lectures will be minimal) and to read occasionally challenging scientific literature. 

Faculty: Carolina Zamora

Course Participation Requirements: Total course involvement will be 5-6 hours per week

Sessions Available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 2: Tuesday, July 5 - Friday, July 16

Books Required: Required art making materials. Paper, scissors, glue and any mark making tool (pencils, colored pencils, charcoal etc)

Virtual Session times: 

  • Tuesdays 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. PT / 2:00 - 3:30 p.m. ET
  • Fridays 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. PT / 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. ET

Writing for College

This course will help prepare students for the quality of writing expected at the college level. Through a variety of different writing activities this course will touch on grammar, punctuation, developing outlines, and composing essays/ We will also include a bit of creative writing, practical writing, social media writing, and then the course by completing a formal research paper.

Faculty: Cindy Frueh

Sessions Available: Sessions 1,2,3 & 4

Course Format: Mostly asynchronous. Every day there will be a writing assignment (fun-not boring or scary!) as well as a bit of work each day towards a traveling story and the final paper.

Books Required: None

Virtual Session times: Sometime between 12:00 - 4:00 p.m. on Fridays

Fundamentals of Economics

Economics is a study of human behavior and helps explain many aspects of our everyday life. In this course, students will learn the basics of both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics in order to better understand both business and the economy as a whole. We will look at factors influencing individuals and businesses and how they make decisions. Then we will look at the economy as a whole and address the measures of economic activities, role of the government and its policies, and the effects of those policies.

The focus of the course will be on applying the principles learned to the world around us. Students will not only apply the tools to the current events and business issues but will be encouraged to think about how these play out in their own lives.

Faculty: Professor Sasha Tomic, PhD

Sessions Available:

Session 1: Monday, June 21 - Friday, July 2

Session 4: Monday, August 2 - Friday, August 13

Course Participation Requirements: Students will attend a synchronous session once per week for 2 hours each.

Required Books/Materials: None.

Virtual Session times: Fridays 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Students may attend up to four different programs, but may not be enrolled in more than one, two-week program at the same time. Registration for the two-week online courses will be on a rolling basis until courses are filled. Students must be at least 14 at the time the program begins to participate. 
Gasson Hall tower and Golden Eagle

Seven-Week Boston College Honors Online Program


 

Boston College will offer a fully online version of its flagship Honors Program to high school students this summer. This program will be open to rising high school juniors and seniors who meet the academic qualifications necessary to participate. Students admitted into the online Boston College Honors Program may choose to enroll in up to two (2) options from a carefully curted list of undergradaute course scheduled to run online through the Boston College's Summer Session in the summer of 2021. 

Please see visit Participant Information for more information on how to apply, admission requirements, costs and other participant related details. 

 

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