Core Fellows

The Core Fellows Program at Boston College enables early career scholars from across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences to develop their research and teaching potential. Core Fellows contribute to the Core Curriculum, the foundational, fifteen-course program in the liberal arts that all Boston College students complete as part of their undergraduate education at a Jesuit, Catholic institution. Fellows are attached to home departments as Visiting Assistant Professors. Salary and research support are competitive. Initial appointments are for one year and are potentially renewable depending on curricular needs.

During one semester, Core Fellows teach lab sections for interdisciplinary Complex Problems courses, team-taught by Boston College faculty. They work alongside experienced teaching mentors on topics such as climate change, race and gender, terrorism, and design and innovation. Labs for Complex Problems courses are devoted to problem- and project-based learning. During the other semester, each Core Fellow teaches an elective in his/her field as well as an Enduring Questions course, linked pairs of classes that two Core Fellows design together.

Before beginning the program, Core Fellows participate in a workshop on interdisciplinary teaching and active learning at Boston College’s Center for Teaching Excellence.

Information about 2019–2020 fellowships will be available on this website in early November 2018. The application deadline is January 15, 2019.

Required specializations vary from year to year. Candidates should exhibit exceptional interdisciplinary research and teaching skills, display a capacity for originality and innovation, and be open to teaching undergraduate students holistically.

Current Core Fellows


William Attwood-Charles

William Attwood-Charles

William Attwood-Charles is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Sociology at Boston College. His research interests include economic and organizational sociology, and the sociology of work. He is particularly interested in efforts at creating alternative institutions that are capable of meeting everyday needs. His previous research examined the practices of “makers” in the context of a multi-purpose shop space, often referred to as a “makerspace.” This research focuses on dynamics of inclusion and exclusion in collectivist environments. His current research explores the role of technology in constructing digital labor platforms, as well as the experience of workers laboring on these platforms.


Jonathan Krones

Jonathan Krones

Jonathan Krones is a 2018-2019 Core Fellow/Visiting Assistant Professor in Environmental Studies. He received his Ph.D. from an interdisciplinary program in Engineering Systems at MIT and was a postdoctoral scholar at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies before starting at Boston College. Jonathan's research is in the field of industrial ecology, focusing on municipal and industrial solid waste systems. Current projects include the development of new methods for quantifying waste streams as well as a critical examination of the role of quantification in sustainable materials and waste management. Before his Ph.D., Jonathan worked in energy, sustainability, and climate policy at local, state, and federal levels. He holds an S.B. in materials science and engineering from MIT and a M.S. in Earth and Environmental Engineering from Columbia University.


Daniel Millan

Daniel Millan

Daniel Millan has a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine with an emphasis in Chicano/Latino Studies. His education also includes a M.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine and a B.A. in Chicano Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research includes the Undocumented Student Equity Project, where he conducted focus groups and interviews with over 180 undocumented students at all nine University of California undergraduate campuses and surveyed over 500 undocumented students. Additionally, Daniel’s research also involves an exploration of how immigration laws and policies produce legal status as consequential across contexts.

Office: Stokes Hall 251S
Email: millanov@bc.edu


Carlos Zúñiga Nieto

Carlos Zúñiga Nieto

Carlos Zúñiga Nieto has a Ph.D., M.Phil., and M.A. from the Columbia University Department of History. He also earned his B.A. in History from Sonoma State University. He is currently working on a manuscript entitled “Violent Passions: Childhood and Emotions in the Making of Modern Mexico, 1870-1910” which tells the story of the crucial role played by emotions in the meaning and process of attaining childhood and adolescence in modern Mexico, in the cities of Mexico City and Merida, located on the greater Caribbean region. His research areas include colonial and modern Latin America with a focus on the greater Caribbean region, childhood and adolescence, and the history of emotions. For the past two years, Carlos has been a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for the History of Emotions at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany.

Office Stokes Hall 272S
Email: zunigoni@bc.edu


Jenna Tonn

Jenna Tonn

Jenna Tonn is the 2017-2018 Core Visiting Assistant Professor in Science and Technology Studies. Dr. Tonn received her Ph.D. in the History of Science from Harvard University and taught in the Program in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Harvard before arriving at Boston College. Her research centers on the social and cultural history of scientific knowledge, with a specific focus on women and gender in STEM. She is currently working on a book about the gendered social world of nineteenth-century experimental biologists. Her next project is a history of radical feminist biology in the postwar United States. Dr. Tonn also holds a B.A. and M.A. from Stanford University.

Office: Stokes Hall 276S
Phone: 617-552-0512


Jesse Tumblin

Jesse Tumblin

Jesse Tumblin is from Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his undergraduate work at the University of Tennessee before moving to Boston in 2009. Jesse completed his Ph.D. in the Department of History at Boston College in 2016. His research focuses on the intersection of militarization, race, and ideas of sovereignty in the British Empire in the early twentieth century.

Jesse’s book manuscript, The Quest for Security: Race, Sovereignty, and the Defense of the British Empire, 1898-1931, has been supported by Boston College, a year-long fellowship at Yale University’s International Security Studies program, the Smith Richardson World Politics and Statecraft fellowship, the Tobin Project for Sustainable National Security Strategy, and the Clough Center for Constitutional Democracy. He also published the article “‘Grey Dawn’ in the British Pacific: Race, Security, and Colonial Sovereignty on the Eve of World War I,” Britain and the World 9, no. 1 (March 2016), which won the Saki Ruth Dockrill Prize for International History from the Institute for Historical Research (IHR) at the University of London.

Dr. Tumblin has taught courses at Boston College since 2015, including the Modern History Core, electives on both world wars, and a Complex Problems class on environmental issues. Jesse looks forward to adding Core Enduring Questions teaching to that mix, as well as a lab-based course on terrorism. Outside work, Jesse enjoys traveling with his wife and daughter, backpacking, snowboarding, pipe collecting, and exploring New England’s small but burgeoning heavy metal scene.

Office: Stokes Hall 248S


Jessica Worl

Jessica Worl

Jessica Worl received her Ph.D. in Resource Policy and Behavior from The University of Michigan in 2019. Her education also includes a Master of Public Policy from the University of Michigan and an A.B. in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology from Harvard University. Her research draws from the environmental humanities, science studies, African studies, and the natural and social sciences to examine the politics and perceptions of environmental health knowledge and regulation of mercury in artisanal and small-scale gold mining communities in East Africa. Her research interests include the spatial and temporal politics of waste, exposure, and resource management as it tracks mercury and gold into the homes, mine shafts, and processing sites of miners to ask broader questions about the possibilities for a global environmental justice movement and processes of knowledge production and application that take seriously both the lives and livelihoods of miners, who depend on mercury to produce gold for world markets.

Office: Stokes Hall 274S
Email: worl@bc.edu


Yasmin Zaerpoor

Yasmin Zaerpoor

Yasmin Zaerpoor earned a Ph.D. in Environmental Policy and Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in June 2019. In addition, she has a M.S. in Urban Planning from Columbia and a B.S. in Animal Physiology and Neuroscience from the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests include Transboundary Water Governance, Environmental Policy and Planning, Sustainable Urban Development (Global Context), Negotiation and Mediation. Yasmin has teaching experience as a graduate teaching assistant for Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning and for Environmental Justice, an “inside-out” class taught at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution – Norfolk. She led an annual two-week urban planning practicum on sustainable development in Malaysia for three years; and was the Instructor of Record for a graduate-level Water Diplomacy course. She has also helped teach Negotiation and Mediation classes.

Office: Stokes Hall 255S
Email: yasmin.zaerpoor@bc.edu