Courses

Courses from many departments are available to International Studies students. Because some of these courses have prerequisites and not all courses are offered every year, students are advised to carefully plan their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisor, our Peer Advisors, and/or our Director of Undergraduate Studies

Course Plans

IS majors and minors should fill out their Course Plans as they enter the program and update them each semester. Bring your Course Plan with you to your advising meetings each semester, and compare it to your official course audit to make sure your classes are properly designated in the UIS registration system. Here are links to the IS Major Course Plan form and the IS Minor Course Plan form. (These forms must be downloaded and saved to your computer before you fill them out.) 

Pre-approved Courses

See below for a list of pre-approved courses offered in the coming semester for the IS major and minor. You can also view our central list of pre-approved electives, which lists all pre-approved courses but does not indicate whether they are taught in a given semester.  (This is most helpful if you want to search or scan by class title or theme; it lists about 300 pre-approved courses and notes the concentrations for which each counts.)

Course Audits

Course Audits are reports from the BC registration system (accessible through the Agora Portal) that chart a student's cumulative progress toward fulfilling graduation requirements. The IS Program's Advising Handbook describes how to read a Course Audit. If a class you've taken (e.g. an elective for an IS major concentration) doesn't appear in the proper part of your Course Audit, fill out a Course Substitution Form to say where it should be placed. Other important forms can be found at the Academic Forms & Diploma Information page at the Office of Student Services. 

 

International Studies Core courses

Pre-approved courses

The following Spring 2023 courses are pre-approved for the core requirements of the IS major.

Introduction to International Relations  (INTL 2501) 
**Register for one lecture and one discussion with the same professor 

  Prof. Jennifer Erickson
  Section 1    Lecture TuTh 9:00 - 10:15am   Stokes 461S
  Section 2   Lecture TuTh 1:30 - 2:45pm  Campion 328
  Section 3:   Discussion  Tu 3:00 - 3:50pm  Mcguinn 11
  Section 4:   Discussion  Tu 4:30 - 5:20pm Mcguinn 11
  Section 5:   Discussion  W 3:00 - 3:50pm Stokes 363S
  Section 6 :  Discussion W 4:30 - 5:20pm Stokes 363S
  Section 7:   Discussion W 5:30 - 6:20pm Stokes 363S

  Prof. Jonathan Kirshner
  Section 8:    Lecture  TuTh 3:00 - 4:15pm Gasson 209
  Section 9:    Discussion   W 1:00 - 1:50pm 245 Beacon 215
  Section 10:  Discussion    W 2:00 - 2:50pm 245 Beacon 215

 

Principles of Economics (ECON 1101)
  Section 1  T Th T Th 9-10:15 + discussion (see EagleApps)
  Section 2  T Th 10:30-11:45 + discussion (see EagleApps)
  Section 3  M W 3:00-4:15 + discussion (see EagleApps)
  Section 4  MWF 3:00-3:50 + discussion (see EagleApps)

Upper-Level Economics Electives
The list below only includes ECON2xxx classes. Any ECON elective at/above the 2000 level can fulfill this requirement, but you may need to be an ECON minor or major to take ECON courses at/above the 3000 level

ECON 2000 The State of Affordable Housing in the States M 4:30-6:30
ECON 2201 Microeconomic Theory  - Multiple, see EagleApps
ECON 2202 Macroeconmic Theory - Multiple, see EagleApps
ECON 2203 Honors Microeconomic Theory TTh 3:00-4:15
ECON 2204 Honors Macroeconomic Theory TTh 1:00-2:45
ECON2207T he Global Economy  TTh 4:30-5:45 [pre-req. ECON 1101]
ECON2208 Economic Justice: A Catholic Approach MWF 12-12:50
ECON2212 Geographic Information Systems for Planning and Decision-Making.  M 7:00-9:30
ECON 2228 Econometric MethodsMultiple, see EagleApps
ECON 2231 Financial Forecasting (Online Asynchronous)
ECON 2242 Public Policy in an Aging Society TTh 3:00-4:15
ECON 2246 Impact of News on Financial Markets TTh 3:00-4:15
ECON 2269 Aspects of Economic Growth MWF 2:00-2:50
ECON 2876 Development and Social Justice in Korea TTh 12-1:15 

Notes on ECON electives:
You must take (or AP out of)  ECON1101 before taking an ECON elective, but some ECON 2xxx classes have additional prerequisites (commonly, calculus and/or econ stats); double-check that you meet those requirements. If department permission required, please email the ECON administrator (Ms. Rowley) well in advance of registration.
.

 

Comparative Politics
POLI 2404 Populism and the Rise of Anti-Democracy MW 4:30-5:45
POLI 2405 Comparative Politics of the Middle East TTH 10:30-11:45
POLI 2431 Radical Political Economy MWF 2:00-2:50
POLI 2440 A Continent on the Move: Immigration in Contemporary Europe MW 4:30-5:45
POLI 2446 Natural Resource Politics.  MW 3:00-4:15

Ethics, Religion & International Politics  (ERIP)
INTL/PHIL/THEO 5563 
Prof. Nelly Wambui Wamaitha
   Lecture:  TTh 1:30 - 2:45. Stokes 117S
   Discussion:  [choose one]
       Th 3:00 - 3:50pm   McGuinn 437
       Th 4:00 - 4:50pm   McGuinn 437


Conflict and Cooperation

Pre-approved courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the C&C concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Spring 2023 pre-approved course list

** See the "CC" tab on the linked spreadsheet for specific information about the Conflict & Cooperation concentration. 
** IS minors should also consult the "Minor" tab for a list of Foundation I and Foundation II courses.  


Ethics and Social Justice

Pre-approved courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the ESJ concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Spring 2023 pre-approved course list

** See the "ESJ" tab on the linked spreadsheet for specific information about the Conflict & Cooperation concentration. 
** IS minors should also consult the "Minor" tab for a list of Foundation I and Foundation II courses.  


Global Cultures

Pre-approved courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the GC concentration in the IS major and minor.

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Global Cultures should take only those electives that are pre-approved for their cluster ("Cultures at Work" or "Cultures and Social Movements"). Students can seek approval to count other courses -- including courses from the other cluster -- as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).   

Spring 2023 pre-approved course list

** See the "GC-CW" and "GC-SM" tabs on the linked spreadsheet for specific information about the Conflict & Cooperation concentration. 
** IS minors should also consult the "Minor" tab for a list of Foundation I and Foundation II courses.  


Political Economy & Development Studies

Pre-approved courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the PEDS concentration in the IS major and minor. 

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Political Economy and Development Studies can take electives approved for EITHER the PE or DS cluster and count them for their own cluster.  Students can seek approval to count other courses as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).

Spring 2023 pre-approved course list

** See the "PEDS" tab on the linked spreadsheet for specific information about the Conflict & Cooperation concentration. 
** IS minors should also consult the "Minor" tab for a list of Foundation I and Foundation II courses.  

Senior Seminars and Thesis Courses

2022-23 course offerings

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis writers enroll in INTL4952 (Prof. Hiroshi Nakazato)
** Your first semester of INTL4952 will count as an elective in your concentration; the second semester will fulfill your senior project requirement.

 

Senior Seminars:

Spring 2023:

Is Globalization Destiny? Historical Perspectives on Global Capitalism  
Prof. Danial Lashkari
INTL 4941.01
Mondays 1:30-3:50pm, McGuinn 030

Recent events like Brexit, the rise of nationalist leaders across the world, the pandemic, and the Russian invasion of Ukraine have revived fundamental questions about the nature and future of globalized capitalism and the liberal order. Do these events portend the end of the current wave of globalization and democratization that had accelerated after the fall of the eastern bloc? Or do these events simply pose challenges that global capitalism and the liberal order will be able to overcome? Is globalization destiny or was it just a moment? This course aims to address these questions through a historical lens.  Since its inception in 17th century Britain and the Netherlands, global capitalism has faced many challenges and insurgencies. We will examine the ways in which political and economic crises helped shape and were shaped by globalization in the process, with a particular focus on the structural transformations happening in the last century. The course also emphasizes the genealogies of ideas and institutions that lie at the core of global capitalism.

 

Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice
Prof. Erik Owens
INTL4941.02
Mondays 3:00 - 5:30pm, Stokes 131N
Global citizenship is a concept and set of practices that, for some, resonates strongly as an ethical ideal to which we ought to strive in an interconnected world, but for others signals an abdication of our responsibilities to our close neighbors or fellow-citizens, or a neo-colonial impulse to remake the world. If global citizenship is at least in part a response to globalization, what is its future in a world of rising nationalism, climate crises, and global pandemics? In this course we will consider multiple angles of entry into the discourse and scholarship about global citizenship that are rooted in political theory, ethics, sociology, education, religious studies, history, and more.

 

Fall 2022:

The United States, the Middle East, and the Media
Prof. Matt Sienkiewicz
INTL4941.01
Thursdays 3:00 - 5:25
This seminar focuses on the way that popular media represents, informs, and becomes a part of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Focusing on film, television, and streaming video, the course considers media texts ranging from American war movies to Israeli dramas to Palestinian situation comedies. Reading and viewing intensive, the seminar asks students to come to class ready to engage in deep, wide-ranging discussions of the books and media they have been assigned each week.

Human Rights in East Asia
Prof. Ingu Hwang
INTL4941.02
Tuesdays 3:00-5:25
This course introduces students to the post–1945 development of global human rights talk, activism, and politics from an East Asian perspective. Through an examination of specific conflicts over self-determination and sovereignty, economic development and disparity, democratization, the legacies of decolonization, and global justice, the course delves into how and why actors in China, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, and North Korea translated local struggles into international human rights agendas that gained attention on the global stage. In exploring this process of translation and appropriation, we will also analyze how these local conflicts transformed international human rights issues.

A Cinema of Resistance
Prof. Jonathan Kirshner
INTL4941.03
Tuesdays 3:00 - 5:25
What is a cinema of resistance? Since the inception of the art form (and to the present day) the movies have been subject to strict and often draconian censorship by dangerous, frightened governments (and abetted by timid studios). Yet throughout history brilliant films of dissent – expressing subversive and forbidden ideas – have been able to find production, despite the ominous, watchful eyes of brutally repressive dictatorships (and hypocritical censorious democracies). This class looks closely at a number of dissident masterpieces produced under chilling circumstances from around the world—and the contentious political contexts in which they were crafted.

New Courses offered in 2022-23

New Spring 2023 courses:

Spatial Data Science and Applications (SCHI 1200) [Schiller Institute]
Prof. Susan Pan,  TuTh 3:00 -4:15
** Counts as a Foundation 2 methods course for all concentrations in the major

Geographies of Nature and the Environment (INTL 2230)
Prof. Joseph Getzoff, TTh 1:30 - 02:45 PM

Environmental Politics of the Middle East (INTL 3340)
Prof. Joseph Getzoff,  M 3:00 - 5:25 PM

Religion & Espionage (HIST4511)
Prof. Charles Gallagher SJ and Prof. Benjamin Braude, Tu 3:00-5:30pm

Approved Summer Abroad Courses

[Summer 2023 courses will be listed here soon...]