Courses

Courses from many departments are available to International Studies students. Because some of these courses have prerequisites and not all courses are offered every year, students are advised to carefully plan their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisor, our Peer Advisors, and/or our Director of Undergraduate Studies

Course Plans

IS majors and minors should fill out their Course Plans as they enter the program -- and update them each semester before meeting with your advisor to plan your future courses. Bring your Course Plan with you to your advising meetings each semester, and compare it to your official course audit to make sure your classes are properly designated in the UIS registration system.

IS Major Course Plan
IS Minor Course Plan

Pre-approved Courses

See below for a list of pre-approved courses offered in Fall 2020 for the IS major and minor. You can also download our master list of pre-approved electives, which is most helpful if you want to search by class rather than concentration; it lists about 300 pre-approved courses and notes the concentrations to which is applies. (Note that the "master list" includes all pre-approved courses, in any semester, so the courses listed may not be taught in coming years.) 

International Studies Core courses

Pre-approved Fall 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the core requirements of the IS major.

Conflict and Cooperation

Pre-approved Fall 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the C&C concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Ethics and Social Justice

Pre-approved Fall 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the ESJ concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Global Cultures

Pre-approved Fall 2020 courses

The following Fall 2020 courses are pre-approved for the GC concentration in the IS major and minor.

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Global Cultures should take only those electives that are pre-approved for their cluster ("Cultures at Work" or "Cultures and Social Movements"). Students can seek approval to count other courses -- including courses from the other cluster -- as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).   

Political Economy & Development Studies

Pre-approved Fall 2020 courses

The following Fall 2020 courses are pre-approved for the PEDS concentration in the IS major and minor. 

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Political Economy and Development Studies can take electives approved for EITHER the PE or DS cluster and count them for their own cluster.  Students can seek approval to count other courses as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).

Senior Seminars and Thesis Courses

Fall 2020 course offerings

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis writers enroll in INTL4952 (Prof. Hiroshi Nakazato) 

 

Senior Seminars:

(1) INTL 4941.01: The Climate Crises and the Religious Imagination

Prof. Mara Willard
Wednesdays 4:30-6:50pm, Stokes 121N

Communities have long found religious meaning in nature, whether related to weather, plague, earthquakes or fire. From imaginations of divine judgement and exception for the pious, or the fragility of human understanding divine will, crisis events shape are shaped by theology and scripture. In this seminar for Seniors in the International Studies program, we will study various examples of such religious meaning making, considering how such imaginations shape not only participants in communities of faith and practice, but also powerfully inform public policy, anxieties within and across population groups, and resistance or responsiveness to human work to address these crisis events. Student interest in theology, philosophy, the arts, medical humanities, and climate change encouraged for a good fit.

 

(2) INTL 4941.02: Identity, Authority, and Legitimacy: Rethinking Loyalty and Group Politics

Prof. Hiroshi Nakazato
Tuesdays 3:00-5:25pm, McGuinn 400

This seminar revisits concepts that most students first likely encountered in the INTL 2500 Introduction to International Relations course. An initial question worth asking is why our standard approaches to understanding international relations (Realism, Liberal Institutionalism, Constructivism, Marxism, etc.) start with states and nations and skip alternate social groupings and identities. A partial answer stems from how scholars approach the topic of international relations theory. Unpacking these inherent assumptions also gives us the necessary intellectual space to introduce new ideas and approaches of what nations are, why alternate identity politics exist, and the ways we understand cultural and political geographies, along with what the limits of our loyalties should be.

 

(3) POLI 345001 International Human Rights and the Refugee Crisis
Prof. Ali Banuazizi
Tuesdays 1:30-4:00pm, McGuinn 223 

[Only 5 INTL seats available, course mixed with Poliitcal Science seniors.]

This seminar provides an overview of the cultural, political, and legal dimensions of human rights norms and practices since World War II as defined by states, regional groups, and international covenants. A special emphasis of the seminar will be on the human rights of religious minorities, refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants worldwide--including those from Syria, Myanmar (the Rohingya), China (the Uighurs), Venezuela, and Central America.

 

 

The following senior seminars will be offered in Spring 2021:  

(1) Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice
Prof. Erik Owens
Times/locationTBA 

Has the COVID-19 global pandemic enhanced our send of global citizenship or diminished it? Global citizenship is a concept and set of practices that, for some, resonates strongly as an ethical ideal to which we ought to strive in an interconnected world, but for others signals an abdication of our responsibilities to our close neighbors or fellow-citizens, or a neo-colonial impulse to remake the world. If global citizenship is at least in part a response to globalization, what is its future in a world of rising nationalism, climate crises, and global pandemics? In this course we will consider multiple angles of entry into the discourse and scholarship about global citizenship that are rooted in sociology, economics, education, political science, religious studies, history, literature, film and other disciplines.   

 

(2) Contentious Politics & Social Movements in the Middle East
Prof. Ali Kadivar
Times/locationTBA 

When we talk about contentious politics, we talk about momentous social phenomena such as social movements, revolutions, civil war, democratization, and nationalism. In all of these instances, people come together to collectively participate in a struggle to make claims on government, often using radical and extra-institutional means in the process. This course first introduces the major theories of social movements that explain the origins, dynamics, and consequences of contentious politics. We will then concentrate on several historic and recent episodes of contentious politics in the Middle East including the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the First and Second Palestinian Intifadas, and the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. We examine how social movement theory helps us to understand these major episodes of mass mobilization in the Middle East, as well as how these episodes prompt us to change our way of thinking about social movements and contentious politics more generally. As we delve into the cases over the course of the semester, we will investigate a wide range of social movement attributes such as movement emergence, member recruitment, leadership, organization, tactics (both violent and nonviolent), targets, and goals while also considering the factors contributing to movement success or failure.