Courses

Courses from many departments are available to International Studies students. Because some of these courses have prerequisites and not all courses are offered every year, students are advised to carefully plan their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisor, our Peer Advisors, and/or our Director of Undergraduate Studies

Course Plans
IS majors and minors should fill out their Course Plans as they enter the program and update them each semester. Bring your Course Plan with you to your advising meetings each semester, and compare it to your official course audit to make sure your classes are properly designated in the UIS registration system. Here are links to the IS Major Course Plan form and the IS Minor Course Plan form. (These forms must be downloaded and saved to your computer before you fill them out.) 

Pre-approved Courses
See below for a list of pre-approved courses offered in Spring 2021 for the IS major and minor. You can also download our master list of pre-approved electives, which is most helpful if you want to search by class rather than concentration; it lists about 300 pre-approved courses and notes the concentrations to which is applies. (Note that the "master list" includes all pre-approved courses, in any semester, so the courses listed may not be taught in coming years.) 

International Studies Core courses

Pre-approved Spring 2021 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the core requirements of the IS major.

Conflict and Cooperation

Pre-approved Spring 2021 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the C&C concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Ethics and Social Justice

Pre-approved Spring 2021 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the ESJ concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Global Cultures

Pre-approved Spring 2021 courses

The following Spring 2021 courses are pre-approved for the GC concentration in the IS major and minor.

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Global Cultures should take only those electives that are pre-approved for their cluster ("Cultures at Work" or "Cultures and Social Movements"). Students can seek approval to count other courses -- including courses from the other cluster -- as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).   

Political Economy & Development Studies

Pre-approved Spring 2021 courses

The following Spring 2021 courses are pre-approved for the PEDS concentration in the IS major and minor. 

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Political Economy and Development Studies can take electives approved for EITHER the PE or DS cluster and count them for their own cluster.  Students can seek approval to count other courses as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).

Senior Seminars and Thesis Courses

Spring 2021 course offerings

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis writers enroll in INTL4952 (Prof. Hiroshi Nakazato) 

 

Senior Seminars:

(1) Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice
Prof. Erik Owens
Mondays 3:00-5:30pm / location TBA / In person

Global citizenship is a concept and set of practices that, for some, resonates strongly as an ethical ideal to which we ought to strive in an interconnected world, but for others signals an abdication of our responsibilities to our close neighbors or fellow-citizens, or a neo-colonial impulse to remake the world. If global citizenship is at least in part a response to globalization, what is its future in a world of rising nationalism, climate crises, and global pandemics? In this course we will consider multiple angles of entry into the discourse and scholarship about global citizenship that are rooted in political theory, ethics, sociology, education, religious studies, history, and more.   

 

(2) The Iranian Revolution and its Aftermath
Prof. Ali Kadivar
Tuesdays 3:00 - 5:30 / Synchronous remote course

In the span of a decade from 1977 to 1988, Iranians first participated in one of the major social revolutions of modern history and then after that the Iraqi invasion in 1981, Iran engaged in the longest interstate war of the 20th century. Why did the revolution happen in Iran? What was the connection between war and revolution? What are the consequences of the revolution and war for politics, society, and economy in Iran, and how have Iranian politics and society  transformed since 1979 in Iran? These are some of the major questions that we try to answer through this course. Through case studies of Iranian revolution and then Iran-Iraq war, we also study main theories of revolution and war and the legacies of these most dramatic political events for post-revolutionary and post-war societies. We specifically examine the birth of the Islamic Republic out of the revolution and war and also major episodes of protest and social movements in the Islamic republic.

 

New Courses offered in Spring 2021

Meaningful Maps: Making Sense of the World Map (INTL2208): 1 credit
Prof. Andrew Grant 
Every other Thursday 4:30 to 6:50pm (in person) 
This bi-weekly one-credit course for juniors or seniors in the IS major increases map literacy so that students can quickly frame global problems by referring to legacies of colonization, settlement, nationalism, language, religion, and environmental change insofar as they can be reflected in world regions. We will have regular map quizzes in addition to light reading and group work. [Junior and senior IS minors will be accepted if space is available; contact Prof. Grant to join a wait list.] 

Religion, Race, and Political Violence (INTL2630)
Prof. Megan McBride
MW 4:30pm (in person)
This course will interrogate the relationship(s) between religion, race, and political violence by exploring the theoretical literature through the lens of mostly contemporary case studies. In exploring these cases, the course will ask: How are religion, race, and political violence related? How do stereotypes about religion and race (and perhaps also violence) influence our understanding of these relationships? What are the consequences of invoking religion and/or race in these conflicts? Who decides when political violence is religious or racial? Do we even need to talk about religion or race to understand this violence? And if so, how might we do so differently?

Governing the Internet: Comparative Perspectives (INTL 2265/COMM 2267)
Prof. Lucas MacClure
MWF 10:00 (in person)
This course, taught by a Chilean legal scholar, examines the regulation of dominant social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America. Topics covered include (1) concepts and history of social media platforms and their regulation, (2) content moderation and harassment, (3) fake news and other forms of disinformation, (4) privacy and use of personal data, and (5) monopoly power and antitrust laws. Students will reflect on how social media regulation can both help and hinder democratic freedoms.

Human Rights in East Asia (INTL 2860/HIST 2855)
Prof. Ingu Hwang
TuTh 12:00-1:15 (in person)
This course introduces students to the post–1945 development of global human rights talk, activism, and politics from an East Asian perspective. Through an examination of specific conflicts over self-determination and sovereignty, economic development and disparity, democratization, the legacies of decolonization, and global justice and environment, the course delves into how and why actors in China, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, and North Korea translated local struggles into international human rights agendas that gained attention on the global stage. 

Korean War: Conflicts, Security, and Peace (INTL 3530/HIST 4021)
Prof. Ingu Hwang
Wed 3:00-5:30 (in person)
In this research and discussion seminar, students engage with recent historical works to explore the Korean War (1950–1953) from its colonial origins and the global military conflict to contemporary security options and the quest for peace in a divided land. What may be “forgotten” in American popular culture remains highly present and relevant in Asia today, not least because the contentious international security mechanisms engendered by this conflict still shape East Asian relations and US foreign policy. (**This course is limited to junior and senior IS and History majors/minors.)

Approved Summer Abroad Courses