Courses

Courses from many departments are available to International Studies students. Because some of these courses have prerequisites and not all courses are offered every year, students are advised to carefully plan their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisor, our Peer Advisors, and/or our Director of Undergraduate Studies

Course Plans

IS majors and minors should fill out their Course Plans as they enter the program -- and update them each semester before meeting with your advisor to plan your future courses. Bring your Course Plan with you to your advising meetings each semester, and compare it to your official course audit to make sure your classes are properly designated in the UIS registration system.

IS Major Course Plan
IS Minor Course Plan

Pre-approved Courses

See below for a list of pre-approved courses offered in Spring 2020 for the IS major and minor. You can also download our master list of pre-approved electives, which is most helpful if you want to search by class rather than concentration; it lists about 300 pre-approved courses and notes the concentrations to which is applies. (Note that the "master list" includes all pre-approved courses, in any semester, so the courses listed may not be taught in coming years.) 

International Studies Core courses

Pre-approved Spring 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the core requirements of the IS major.

Conflict and Cooperation

Pre-approved Spring 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the C&C concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Ethics and Social Justice

Pre-approved Spring 2020 courses

The following courses are pre-approved for the ESJ concentration in the IS major and minor. Students may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to consider courses that are not on this list toward their elective concentration.

Global Cultures

Pre-approved Spring 2020 courses

The following Spring 2020 courses are pre-approved for the GC concentration in the IS major and minor.

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Global Cultures should take only those electives that are pre-approved for their cluster ("Cultures at Work" or "Cultures and Social Movements"). Students can seek approval to count other courses -- including courses from the other cluster -- as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).   

Political Economy & Development Studies

Pre-approved Spring 2020 courses

The following Spring 2020 courses are pre-approved for the PEDS concentration in the IS major and minor. 

Please note: Majors and minors who concentrate in Political Economy and Development Studies can take electives approved for EITHER the PE or DS cluster and count them for their own cluster.  Students can seek approval to count other courses as electives by sending a course abstract and/or syllabus to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof. Nakazato) before the first week of that class (and ideally during registration period).

Senior Seminars and Thesis Courses

Spring 2020 course offerings

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis writers enroll in INTL4952 (Prof. HIroshi Nakazato) 

 

Senior Seminars:

INTL 4941-01: Keynes in His Time—and Ours

Prof. Jonathan Kirshner
Tuesdays 3:00-5:25pm
Stokes 103S

John Maynard Keynes was the most influential economist of the twentieth century—and the most misunderstood, with his vast, nuanced writings on innumerable topics commonly reduced to the mechanistic (and often controversial) practice of “postwar Keynesianism.” But Keynes was so much more than that, and he was immersed – as a scholar, government official, and public intellectual – in the great issues of his time. These included the fragility of the international economic order, the contentious politics of central banking, the causes of catastrophic global financial crises, the challenge of secular stagnation, the implications of economic inequality, and role of international institutions in the global economy—each of which has remarkable parallels to the great issues of today. In this seminar, we will read Keynes’ own writings and consider how they engaged the daunting problems of his time, and how they can be applied to the pressing political-economic challenges of ours.

 

INTL 4941-02: Global Citizenships
Prof. Erik Owens
Wednesdays 3:00-5:25pm
Gasson 201

Global citizenship is a concept and set of practices that, for some, resonates strongly as an ethical ideal to which we ought to strive in an interconnected world, but for others signals an abdication of our responsibilities to our close neighbors or fellow-citizens, or a neo-colonial impulse to remake the world. If global citizenship is at least in part a response to globalization, what is its future in a world of rising nationalism? In this course we will consider multiple angles of entry into the discourse and scholarship about global citizenship that are rooted in sociology, economics, education, political science, religious studies, history, literature, film and other disciplines.   

 

INTL 4941-03: Contentious Politics & Social Movements in the Middle East
Prof. Ali Kadivar
Mondays 3:00-5:25pm
McGuinn 413

When we talk about contentious politics, we talk about momentous social phenomena such as social movements, revolutions, civil war, democratization, and nationalism. In all of these instances, people come together to collectively participate in a struggle to make claims on government, often using radical and extra-institutional means in the process. This course first introduces the major theories of social movements that explain the origins, dynamics, and consequences of contentious politics. We will then concentrate on several historic and recent episodes of contentious politics in the Middle East including the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the First and Second Palestinian Intifadas, and the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. We examine how social movement theory helps us to understand these major episodes of mass mobilization in the Middle East, as well as how these episodes prompt us to change our way of thinking about social movements and contentious politics more generally. As we delve into the cases over the course of the semester, we will investigate a wide range of social movement attributes such as movement emergence, member recruitment, leadership, organization, tactics (both violent and nonviolent), targets, and goals while also considering the factors contributing to movement success or failure.