Diversity Challenge

The Institute was founded in 2000 at Boston College, under the direction of Dr. Janet E. Helms, to promote the assets and address the societal conflicts associated with race and culture in theory and research, mental health practice, education, business, and society at large. Each year the Institute addresses a racial or cultural issue that could benefit from a pragmatic, scholarly, or grassroots focus through its Diversity Challenge conference.

2022 Diversity Challenge

Considering Racial Trauma: Strategies for Healing & Empowerment
November 11 & 12, 2022
Online via Zoom

The 2022 Diversity Challenge will focus on strategies and interventions designed to facilitate healing from racial trauma and will address racial trauma from multiple perspectives. Presentations will focus on multigenerational trauma, healing through storytelling, utilization of research as a tool for empowerment and liberation, understanding the effects of racial trauma on academic performance, and surviving and thriving in the midst of ongoing racially traumatic experiences. The conference is thrilled to welcome nationally recognized experts sharing their perspectives, insights, and research, and we look forward to hearing from graduate students during the poster presentation session. Events over the past years have highlighted the ongoing and urgent need to address the harmful effects of racism and to be more vigilant in our efforts focused on both intervening and preventing the traumatic effects of race and racism. We look forward to you joining us in this important work of healing and hope the conference will provide a source of knowledge, reinvigoration, and empowerment.

Current Schedule
 

Fall 2022 Schedule

Speakers & Presenters

Matthew J. Miller, Ph.D.

Matthew J. Miller, Ph.D.

Professor, Loyola University Chicago



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Matthew J. Miller, Ph.D.

Matthew J. Miller, Ph.D.

Professor, Loyola University Chicago

Matthew J. Miller, PhD, (he/him) is Professor at Loyola University Chicago where he currently holds the Fr. Walter P. Krolikowski, SJ Endowed Research Professorship. He directs the Race, Culture, and Health Equity Lab, is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and is a Board Member of the Asian American Psychological Association Executive Committee. His research program (a) examines ways in which racism and cultural experiences related to mental health in AAPI populations and in other diverse communities, (b) evaluates the measurement of racial and cultural constructs, and (c) explores the ways in which storytelling can help individuals and communities heal from racial trauma and oppression. He is also a filmmaker and the creator of SPOKENproject, a series of first-person narrative documentary-style videos designed to help people cope with racism and also provide experiences of validation, support, and healing.

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D.

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Michigan



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Kevin Cokley, Ph.D.

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Michigan

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D. is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan where he serves as Associate Chair of Diversity Initiatives for the Department of Psychology. Previously he was Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas, where he held the Oscar and Anne Mauzy Regents Professorship for Educational Research and Development. He has been a Fellow of the University of Texas System and University of Texas Academy of Distinguished Teachers, past Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis, and Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies.  His research and teaching can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial identity and understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American students’ academic achievement. Dr. Cokley studies the psychosocial experiences of African American students and students of color and is currently exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes. He is the past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology, holds the title of Distinguished Psychologist, and received the Scholarship Award from the Association of Black Psychologists. He is President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race, and was elected to Fellow status in the American Psychological Association for his contributions to ethnic minority psychology and counseling psychology. He is the recipient of the Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award, the Charles and Shirley Thomas Award for mentoring ethnic minority students, and the 10 Rising Stars of the Academy award by Diverse Issues in Higher Education. He is the author of the 2014 book “The Myth of Black Anti-Intellectualism” which challenges the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and editor of the 2021 book “Making Black Lives Matter: Confronting Anti-Black Racism.” His research has been recognized in media outlets including the New York Times, USA Today, and Inside Higher Education.

 

B. Andi Lee, M.S.

B. Andi Lee, M.S.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology



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B. Andi Lee, M.S.

B. Andi Lee, M.S.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology

B. Andi Lee is a sixth-year healer-in-training and doctoral candidate in Clinical-Community Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research aims to challenge systemic racism, foster wellness, and promote the humanity of Global Majority members by centering their lived experiences and expertise in belonging, healing, and liberation. Particularly, she is interested in how racial-ethnic-cultural (REC) belonging is defined and experienced by Global Majority members and how it impacts psychosocial well-being. Her recent published work includes models that promote Global Majority healing research methods, training models for liberation, and decolonial psychological science. She enjoys lifelong learning, collective organizing with comrades, and mentoring other Global Majority students navigating academia.

Helen A. Neville, PhD

Helen A. Neville, PhD

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



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Helen A. Neville, PhD

Helen A. Neville, PhD

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Helen A. Neville is a professor of Educational Psychology and African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is past president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race (APA Division 45) and a fellow of the American Psychological Association. She is active in the Association of Black Psychologists, having served on their Board of Directors and receiving their Distinguished Psychologist award. Her research on race, racism, and African American psychology has been published in a wide range of journal articles and she has co-edited 8 books in this area. She enjoys teaching, lifelong learning, and fighting for social justice. 

Nimot Ogunfemi, M.S.

Nimot Ogunfemi, M.S.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology



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Nimot Ogunfemi, M.S.

Nimot Ogunfemi, M.S.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology

Nimot Ogunfemi is a sixth-year doctoral student and pre-doctoral intern at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She is an active member of The Association of Black Psychologists and an enthusiastic member of her community, often working at the intersections of healing and creative practices. She has co-authored several book chapters on topics including African Feminism and healing through the arts. Her research follows the radical tradition of Liberation Psychology, and advocates for social justice through the utilization of indigenous approaches to healing/education. She enjoys making, learning, teaching, and spending time with nature.  

Salman Safir, M.A.

Salman Safir, M.A.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology



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Salman Safir, M.A.

Salman Safir, M.A.

Doctoral Student, Counseling Psychology

Salman Safir (he/him) is a second year doctoral student in the counseling psychology program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Under the guidance of. Dr. Helen Neville and his colleagues in the Liberation Lab, he studies bibliotherapy, radical hope & healing, South Asian US Muslim Americans, ethno-racial identity development, Shī’īsm, and gender & sexuality among US Muslim Americans as they each relate to mental health. He currently serves as a Community Learning and Development Co-Chair on the Student Affiliates of Seventeen Executive Board. Prior to beginning his doctoral degree, he earned an MA in Divinity Studies from the University of Chicago, where he also earned a graduate certificate in Health Care Administration and Policy. He received a BA in Educational Studies and Psychology from Swarthmore College. Between his undergraduate and graduate studies, he worked in the Intercultural Engagement Programme at Yale-NUS College in Singapore. Outside of academics, he enjoys rooting for Wisconsin professional sports teams, as well as browsing any bookstore he can find. He lives with his cat Eeyore, who tolerates him.

Terril O. Taylor, M.A.

Terril O. Taylor, M.A.

Pre-Doctoral Intern, University of Texas - Austin



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Terril O. Taylor, M.A.

Terril O. Taylor, M.A.

Pre-Doctoral Intern, University of Texas - Austin

Terrill O. Taylor is a doctoral candidate in the Counseling Psychology program at the University of North Dakota, and a predoctoral intern at the Counseling and Mental Health Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His areas of research focus on issues of race and racism, with specific emphasis on intersectionality, racial disparities in systems of justice, anti-Black racism, and restorative justice.

He developed the Restorative Justice Attitudes Scale, a measure designed to investigate individuals’ support for reconciliation and healing processes, which was published in The Counseling Psychologist. He has since used the measure to analyze how race and racism influence individuals’ decision-making when interfaced with systems of justice. It is his intent to develop intervention and prevention mechanisms that will have an impact on dismantling all forms of racism and oppression that restrict Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) from living authentic, healthy, and meaningful lives.

Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Ph.D.

Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor Emerita, Rutgers University



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Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Ph.D.

Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Dr. Nancy Boyd-Franklin is an African American psychologist, family therapist, and Distinguished Professor Emerita from Rutgers University in the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP).  She is the author or coauthor of seven books including Black Families in Therapy: Understanding the African American Experience (1st & 2nd Edition). An internationally acclaimed author and lecturer, Dr. Boyd-Franklin has written numerous professional articles and chapters on issues such as the treatment of African American families, race, racism, poverty, extended family issues, spirituality and religion, home-based family therapy, at-risk adolescents, the Multi systems Model, multicultural treatment approaches, cultural competency, ethnicity and family therapy, group therapy for Black women, HIV and AIDS, parent and family support groups, and community empowerment. She has received an Honorary Doctorate from the Phillips Graduate Institute. Her outstanding contributions to the field have been recognized through awards from many professional organizations including the American Psychological Association, the American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA), the Association of Black Psychologists, the Association of Black Social Workers, the American Psychiatric Association, and the Janet Helms Award from the Teachers College Multicultural Roundtable at Columbia University.

Hector Y. Adames, Psy.D.

Hector Y. Adames, Psy.D.

Professor, Chicago School of Professional Psychology



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Hector Y. Adames, Psy.D.

Hector Y. Adames, Psy.D.

Professor, Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Dr. Hector Y. Adames received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the APA accredited program at Wright State University in Ohio and completed his APA predoctoral internship at the Boston University School of Medicine’s Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology (CMTP). By training, he is a neuropsychologist and is currently a Full Professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology Chicago Campus. He co-founded and co-directs the IC-RACE Lab. Dr. Adames has over 20 peer-reviewed publications and has authored four books including (a) Cultural Foundations and Interventions in Latinx Mental Health: History, Theory and within Group Differences published by Routledge Press, (b) Caring for Latinxs with Dementia in a Globalized world published by Springer, (3) Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide published by Wiley, and (4) Succeeding as a Therapist: How to Create a Thriving Practice in a Changing World published by the American Psychological Association. His research focuses on how socio-race, skin color, colorism, and ethnic and racial group membership influence wellness. He has earned several awards including the 2018 Distinguished Emerging Professional Research Award from The Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race, a Division of the American Psychological Association (APA), and the 2020 Distinguished Star Vega Award from the National Latinx Psychological Association (NLPA). In 2021, he was honored with a Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association for his commitment to human rights and racial justice through his research, service, and mentorship. You can follow Dr. Adames on Twitter and Instagram @HYAdames or visit his lab at www.icrace.org

Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas, PhD

Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas, PhD

Professor, Chicago School of Professional Psychology



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Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas, PhD

Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas, PhD

Professor, Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas, Ph.D. received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the APA accredited program at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She is a Professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) where she serves as the faculty coordinator for the concentration in Latinx Mental Health in the Counseling Psychology Department. She is the Co-Director of the IC-RACE Lab (Immigration Critical Race and Cultural Equity Lab). She has co-authored two books: (a) Cultural Foundations and Interventions in Latinx Mental Health: History, Theory and within Group Differences published by Routledge Press, (c) Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide, 6th Ed. published by Wiley, and (d) Succeeding as a Therapist: How to Create a Thriving Practice in a Changing World published by the American Psychological Association. Her research focuses on colorism, skin-color differences, parenting styles, immigration, unaccompanied minors, multiculturalism, and race relations. She has earned a number of awards including the 2018 American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Citizen Psychologist Award and the National Multicultural Summit (NMCS) Shining Star Award. To learn more, please visit Dr. Chavez-Dueñas’ lab at www.icrace.org  You can follow her on Twitter @NYChavez and Instagram @NYChavezd

Ann Saw, Ph.D.

Ann Saw, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, DePaula University



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Ann Saw, Ph.D.

Ann Saw, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, DePaula University

Anne Saw, Ph.D. is an associate professor of psychology and affiliated faculty with Refugee and Forced Migration Studies and Global Asian Studies programs at DePaul University in Chicago and past vice president of the Asian American Psychological Association, a national organization whose mission is to advance the mental health and well-being of Asian American communities through research, professional practice, education, and policy. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Saw conducts community-engaged, participatory research with Asian American immigrant and refugee populations to promote health and mental health through culturally responsive interventions and policy advocacy. In addition to multiple awards for her research, teaching, and advocacy, her research and community-based advocacy have been featured in media outlets including the New York Times, USA Today, Reuters, Chicago Sun-Times, and Ms. Magazine.

E.J.R David, Ph.D.

E.J.R David, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Anchorage



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E.J.R David, Ph.D.

E.J.R David, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Anchorage

E. J. R. David, Ph.D. is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Alaska Anchorage, specializing in ethnic minority psychology. He has produced four books: Brown Skin, White Minds: Filipino -/ American Postcolonial Psychology (2013), Internalized Oppression: The Psychology of Marginalized Groups (2014), The Psychology of Oppression (2017), and We Have Not Stopped Trembling Yet (2018). He was the 2012 American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program Early Career Award in Research for Distinguished Contributions to the Field of Racial and Ethnic Minority Psychology; the 2013 Asian American Psychological Association Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research; and in 2015 he was inducted as a Fellow by the Asian American Psychological Association for “Unusual and Outstanding Contributions to Asian American Psychology.”

Usha Tummala-Narra, Ph.D

Usha Tummala-Narra, Ph.D

Research Professor and Director of Community Based Education Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University



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Usha Tummala-Narra, Ph.D

Usha Tummala-Narra, Ph.D

Research Professor and Director of Community Based Education Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University

Usha Tummala-Narra, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and the Director of Community-Based Education at the Albert and Jessie Danielsen Institute and a Research Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University. Her research and scholarship focus on immigration, trauma, race, and culturally-informed psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Her publications include over 90 peer-reviewed articles and chapters in books. She is also in Independent Practice and works primarily with survivors of trauma from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. In past years, she served as a Member-at-Large on the Board of Directors in APA Division 39 (Society for Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychology), the chair of the APA Division 39 Multicultural Concerns Committee, and as a member of the APA Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs, the APA Presidential Task Force on Immigration, and the APA Task Force on Revising the Multicultural Guidelines. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, and of APA Division 39 and Division 45.

Dennis C. Wendt, Ph.D.

Dennis C. Wendt, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, McGill University



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Dennis C. Wendt, Ph.D.

Dennis C. Wendt, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, McGill University

Dennis C. Wendt is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology at McGill University, and the Director of the Cultural and Indigenous Research in Counselling Psychology (CIRC) lab. He also is an Associate Member of the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University. Dr. Wendt completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Michigan in 2015, including an APA-accredited internship at the Southwest Consortium in Albuquerque, New Mexico. For the past 12 years, Dr. Wendt has collaborated with Indigenous communities in Canada and the United States in exploring, developing, and evaluating culturally relevant interventions pertaining to mental health, substance use, and community wellness. The author of over 35 peer-reviewed publications, Prof. Wendt is the recipient of the 2021 Distinguished Early Career Contributions in Qualitative Inquiry Award and the 2016 Distinguished Dissertation Award in Qualitative Inquiry, both from the American Psychological Association (APA) Division of Quantitative and Qualitative Methods. He collaborates with researchers from Harvard University, University of Washington, University of New Mexico, Université de Montréal, University of Calgary, Dalhousie University, Concordia University, University of New Brunswick, and Lakehead University, as well as with nine First Nations or Indigenous organizations in Canada and two American Indian Tribes. He is on the Editorial Board of The Counseling Psychologist and the Canadian Journal of School Psychology.

Maria C. Crouch, Ph.D.

Maria C. Crouch, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Yale University



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Maria C. Crouch, Ph.D.

Maria C. Crouch, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Yale University

Maria Christina Crouch, Ph.D., is a clinical-community psychologist and a postdoctoral research fellow at Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry. She is of Deg Hit’an (deeg-hit-an) and Coahuiltecan (ko-wa-wee-tec-an) Tribal enrollment/heritage. Her clinical work and program of research is at the intersection of trauma-informed care, evidence-based practices, and practice-based evidence (Indigenous approaches) to address alcohol and drug issues and related health impacts of social determinants among American Indian and Alaska Native communities from a cultural, strengths-based approach. 

Stephanie Gillson, M.D.

Stephanie Gillson, M.D.

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow, Yale School of Medicine



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Stephanie Gillson, M.D.

Stephanie Gillson, M.D.

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow, Yale School of Medicine

Stefanie Gillson MD (Dakota- Santee Sioux) is from Mni Sota Makoce also known as Minnesota and the Dakota homelands, she is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow at Yale Child Study Center. She finished her General Psychiatry Residency and Public Psychiatry Fellowship at Yale University in 2021 where she was the Chief Resident of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Dr. Gillson earned her undergraduate and medical degree from the University of Minnesota where her education was focused on rural and Indigenous health. She is currently a scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health within the Bloomberg School of Public Health where her research and service portfolio focuses on developing community-based initiatives to address mental health disparities among Indigenous communities through a historical and contemporary lens. More recently, she was awarded a grant from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry to focus on the prevalence of Indigenous children in foster care and other out-of-home placements and their impact on mental health throughout the time course with an emphasis on investigating cultural protective factors. She is a member of the Association of American Indian Physicians where her primary focus is recruiting Indigenous youth into the medical field.  Aside from her work with Indigenous communities, she is the co-founder of the Yale Women’s Mental Health Conference at Yale and Yale Women’s Housestaff Association which focus on supporting women and increasing the education for trainees.

Anneliese Singh, Ph.D.

Anneliese Singh, Ph.D.

Professor, Tulane University



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Anneliese Singh, Ph.D.

Anneliese Singh, Ph.D.

Professor, Tulane University

Anneliese Singh, PhD, LPC (she/they) is a Professor and Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development/Chief Diversity Officer at Tulane University. Their scholarship and community organizing explores racial healing, racial justice, and racial liberation, as well as the resilience, trauma, and identity development experiences of queer and trans people, with a focus on young people and people of color. Anneliese is the author of The Racial Healing Handbook: Practical Activities to Help You Challenge Privilege, Confront Systemic Racism, and Engage in Collective Healing and The Queer and Trans Resilience Workbook. Anneliese is co-founder of the Georgia Safe Schools Coalition and the Trans Resilience Project. Dr. Singh is @anneliesesingh on Twitter and Instagram, and her website is www.anneliesesingh.com.  

As a result of attending the conference, my thinking about the ways gender, race and ethnic identity develop among women and girls and its psychological outcomes has deepened in complexity and understanding.
Diversity Challenge participant

Past Events