Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology

Division 24 of the American Psychological Association

2023 Annual Spring Meeting

The Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology (STPP-APA Division 24) will hold its annual Spring Meeting at Boston College from April 21–23, 2023. The purpose of the conference is to build community and share ideas related to the theory, practice, and reimagining of psychology as a discipline and agent for social change. The presidential theme for this year is Constructing the Psychological Humanities (see full Presidential Theme below). Come join us for scholarly engagement, discussion, and reflection in a stimulating and inclusive atmosphere!

Theoretical & Philosophical Psychology

At a Glance


Date

9 a.m. on Friday, April 21 -
6 p.m. on Sunday, April 23, 2023


Location

Boston College Campus and Online


Lodging & Accomodations

AC Marriott, Cleveland Circle

Book a Room

2023 Invited Speakers

Richard Kearney

Richard Kearney

Boston College

Lynne Layton

Lynne Layton

Harvard Medical School

Brent Slife

Brent Slife

Brigham Young University

Derek Hook

Derek Hook

Duquesne University

Zenobia Morrill

Zenobia Morrill

William James College

2023 Presidential Theme:

Constructing the Psychological Humanities

That the discipline of psychology is treated as a “science” and nothing more is reductive and constraining – on this we can all agree. We, in Division 24, have long argued for the pluralization of methods, the incorporation of the humanities, and the broadening of psychological discourse to include its theoretical and philosophical foundations. In recent years, a burgeoning interest in what has been called the “psychological humanities” has emerged with many of us hoping that it will galvanize these interdisciplinary realignments. We’ve come to this with different rationales. Some have seen in this movement the capacity for uncovering the power structures at work beneath our subjectivities (e.g., Rutherford, Teo), others a means of seeking greater fidelity to human experience (e.g., Freeman), and others a recognition of the moral and cultural horizons our psychological technologies reflect and reinforce (e.g., Cushman, Marecek). Behind this plurality of hopes and ambitions, there is a worthwhile question: Why is the development of a psychological humanities important and what is it in the service of?

This year’s presidential theme does not seek to resolve this question or provide a common ground. Rather, it invites us to give an account of ourselves, to deepen our understanding and articulation of why we desire a more human, humane, and humanities-informed psychology. What would such a psychology look like? Who would it serve? The various interests and commitments we bring to these questions open the possibility of a community living with a fuller and more diverse vision of the future – in dialogue together.

Registration Information

 

Institutionally Supported Faculty/Professionals

$190

 

 

Graduate Students

  $50

 

 

Undergraduate Students 

  $20

 

 

Virtual Only:
Institutionally Supported Faculty/Professionals

$165

 

 

Virtual Only:
Graduate Students

  $30

 

 

Virtual Only:
Undergraduate Students

  $10

 

Call for Proposals

We will find that psychotherapy in our era has unknowingly helped perpetuate self-contained individualism, certain era-specific moral frameworks, and the political status quo. If that is so, what is still possible for us? How do we construct an increasingly impossible bridge?

-Cushman, 1996

One of the goals of this year's conference is to explore the construction of the psychological humanities and what it is in the service of. Broadly stated, this year’s theme calls us to consider: What would a more human, humane, and humanities-informed psychology look like? Is such a bridge, as Cushman describes it, even possible? If so, what would it do? Why would we desire such a psychology? Who would it serve? 

This theme is an invitation to explore and contribute to a discourse of the pluralization of methods, the incorporation of the humanities, and the rich theoretical and philosophical foundations of psychology. Interdisciplinary proposals are encouraged. 

The call for proposals has been completed (deadline November 15). Notifications to speakers will occur by January 15.