International Higher Education Summer Seminars

Our engaging, practice-oriented summer short courses are geared towards higher education professionals and graduate students seeking professional renewal, new skills, knowledge, and career advancement. 

Questions about the summer series can be directed to internationalhighered@bc.edu.

At a Glance

Who should attend?

Higher education professionals, adminstrators, and graduate students


What's the format?

Courses are held online, using a mix of Zoom sessions and other online activities


How much time is involved in each course?

10-15 hours of online participation generally arranged over the course of a week



 

Summer 2020 Courses

Internationalizing the Curriculum

Instructor: Betty Leask

In the past decade, traditional approaches to internationalization in higher education have been challenged on the basis that universities have a responsibility to develop all students intercultural skills and international awareness in a globally connected world. Traditional approaches focused on mobility for a minority, or the recruitment of international students, are insufficient for this task. Further, the COVID-19 virus is also likely to significantly reduce the international movement of students for at least 5 years. Hence, internationalization of the curriculum, teaching and learning at home for all students will become even more important in the next decade. This situation creates both challenges and opportunities for university leaders, faculty who design and teach courses and staff who facilitate and support the learning and development of students in the co-curriculum. Research over the past decade has repeatedly shown that while some of the challenges faced are context-dependent, others are shared across a range of different disciplinary, institutional, and national contexts. In this course we will take stock of what we know today - and what we don’t know - about internationalization of the curriculum, teaching and learning at home, in class and on campus. Presentations by international experts in the field will provoke critical reflection on the past, the present and the future and the traditional roles played by faculty, staff and students in internationalizing the curriculum.

Format

Online
Self-paced and Asynchronous

Offered

June 8th -12th, 2020

 

Cost

$400

Serving International Students and Scholars

Instructor: Adrienne Nussbaum

Despite recent trends, the United States continues to be one of the most popular destination countries globally for internationally students, faculty and researchers. Serving this growing and diverse population has taken on new and complex dimensions under the current administration, with implications for universities at all levels. This course will provide participants with a grounding in the fundamentals of international student and scholar services.  This will include an overview of practical matters governing effective support services design and delivery such as immigration advising and cross-cultural programming.  Additionally, the specific knowledge, attitudes, and skills required to work in this profession will be explored, with a particular emphasis on intercultural competency.   Ideally suited for early practitioners hoping to work directly with international students and scholars, this course may also be useful for anyone looking for greater insight into inbound mobility trends and issues affecting US higher education, and their practical implications. 

 

Format

Online
Self-paced and Asynchronous

Offered

June 1st- June 5th, 2020
Live Session I: June 2, 4:30-6pm
Live Session II: June 4, 4:30-6pm

Cost

$400

Refugees and Migrants in Higher Education

Instructors: Lisa Unangst and Hans de Wit

Forced displacement, as calculated by UNHCR, has now exceeded 68 million people worldwide. The resulting influx of refugees to temporary and semi-permanent “host” countries has prompted higher education institutions and policy actors to innovate pathways to tertiary education. Concurrently, both “old” and “new” immigrant-receiving contexts are called to facilitate the tertiary access and attainment of students from a migrant background. This population may include students of the so-called first, second, or third generations. In this online course, we probe questions of access and experience among migrant and refugee populations as related to higher education institutions globally. We focus this conversation on the post-1945 period, beginning our discussions with a brief overview of global migration trends. We then consider various approaches to the support of migrant students in key world regions, highlighting comparative data, before turning to refugee student support in both “brick and mortar” as well as online settings. The final portion of the course allows for an integrative discussion of educational equity and policy innovation supporting immigrant and refugee students alike.

Format

Online

Offered

June 18, 2020: 8:30am-10:30am
June 19, 2020: 9am-11am

Cost

$400