John J. Paris, S.J.

Michael P. Walsh Professor of Bioethics Emeritus; Research Professor

Profile

Father John Paris is the Michael P. Walsh Professor of Bioethics at Boston College. His areas of expertise include Catholic ethics; bioethics; issues related to medical treatment termination and patient rights. He is frequently called as an expert witness in legal cases involving termination of medical treatment and has served as a consultant and expert witness in many landmark biomedical cases. Father Paris has served as consultant to the President's Commission for the Study of Ethics in Medicine, the United States Senate Committee on Aging, and the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. He is the co-author of the law case book, Biotechnology, Bioethics and the Law (LexisNexis, 2016). Fr. Paris has published 192 articles in the area of law, medicine, and ethics in such entities as The New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, the Wall Street Journal and Forbes. Among the articles published: "Ethical Issues in Pediatric Face Transplantation: Should We Perform Face Transplantation in Children?" (Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, August 2016); “Why Involve Physicians in Assisted Suicide?” (American Journal of Bioethics); “Standards, Norms and Guidelines for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support from Seriously Compromised Newborns,” (American Journal of Bioethics); “Does Compassion for a Family Justify Providing Futile CPR?” (Journal of Perinatology); “What do you tell the family who asks, ‘What went wrong?’ The truth and nothing but the truth” (Journal of Perinatology); “Ethical and Legal Issues in Intensive Care,” (Manual of Intensive Care Medicine); “Circulator Arrest in a Brain-Dead Organ Donor: Is the Use of Cardiac Compression Permissible?” (Journal of Internal Care Medicine); “Decisions for Life Made in the Perinatal Period: Who Decides and on Which Standards?” (Archives of Disease in Childhood Fetal and Neonatal Edition); and “Ethical Issues in Resuscitation of Infants at the Margins of Viability,” (Practical Bioethics).