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Center for Human Rights and International Justice

Upcoming Events

Kalina Brabeck

After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'? Conversation series

The Influence of Immigrant Parent Legal Status on Immigrant Families and Developmental Outcomes for US-born Middle Childhood Children

Thursday, October 6
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
McGuinn 334

With Kalina Brabeck, Associate Professor of Counseling, Rhode Island College. This event is Part 2 of the “After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'?” conversation series this fall.

Professor Brabeck is a longtime collaborator with the Center's "Human Rights of Migrants: Transnational and Mixed-Status Families" project.  See some of her collaborative research with Center Co-Director Brinton Lykes here.

RSVP required below:  

 

 
David Hollenbach, S.J.

Public Theology and the Global Common Good: The Contribution of David Hollenbach, S.J.

Friday, October 14 - Saturday, October 15
Gasson Hall & Simboli Hall, Boston College

View the full conference schedule and register online by October 10 »

This conference will celebrate the work of David Hollenbach, S.J. and mark the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ pastoral letter “Economic Justice for All”. The conference will begin Friday afternoon, October 14, with a public keynote lecture by Ambassador Ken Hackett and continue Saturday, October 15, with presentations by David’s former students and colleagues, opening a conversation with a newer generation of theologians on the future of public theology and the common good.

SPONSORS

Institute for the Liberal Arts; Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences; The Jesuit Institute; Theology Department; School of Theology and Ministry; International Studies Program; Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life; and the Center for Human Rights and International Justice

 
medea benjamin

Book discussion: Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection

Thursday, October 20
7:00PM
Gasson 305

With Medea Benjamin, author and co-founder of the organization Code Pink.

About the book:

In seven succinct chapters followed by a meditation on prospects for change, Benjamin—cited by the L.A. Times as “one of the high-profile members of the peace movement”—shines a light on one of the most perplexing elements of American foreign policy. What is the origin of this strange alliance between two countries that seemingly have very little in common? Why does it persist, and what are its consequences? Why, over a period of decades and across various presidential administrations, has the United States consistently supported a regime shown time and again to be one of the most powerful forces working against American interests? Saudi Arabia is perhaps the single most important source of funds for terrorists worldwide, promoting an extreme interpretation of Islam along with anti-Western sentiment, while brutally repressing non-violent dissidents at home.

With extremism spreading across the globe, a reduced U.S. need for Saudi oil, and a thawing of U.S. relations with Iran, the time is right for a re-evaluation of our close ties with the Saudi regime.

About Medea Benjamin:

Medea Benjamin is the co-founder of the women-led peace group CODEPINK and the co-founder of the human rights group Global Exchange. She has been an advocate for social justice for more than 40 years. Described as "one of America's most committed -- and most effective -- fighters for human rights" by New York Newsday, and "one of the high profile leaders of the peace movement" by the Los Angeles Times, she was one of 1,000 exemplary women from 140 countries nominated to receive the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the millions of women who do the essential work of peace worldwide.

She is the author of nine books, including Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control and the forthcoming Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection, and her articles appear regularly in outlets such as The Huffington Post, CommonDreams, Alternet, The Other Words, and TeleSUR.

Event co-sponsored by Students for Justice in Palestine, the Islamic Civilization & Societies program, the History Department and the Sociology Department.

RSVP for the Benjamin event here:

 

 
Roberto Gonzales

After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'? Conversation series

Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

Thursday, November 3
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Campion Hall, Room 139

With Roberto Gonzales, Assistant Professor of Education at Harvard University, and authour of "Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America."

This event is Part 3 of the “After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'?” conversation series this fall.

RSVP required below:  

 

 
Mary Waters

After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'? Conversation series

The War on Crime and the War on Immigrants: Racial and Legal Exclusion in the 21st Century United States

Thursday, November 17
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Barat House, BC Newton campus

With Mary Waters, M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology at Harvard University. This event is Part 4 of the “After Obama: What is the future of our 'Nation of Immigrants'?” conversation series this fall.

RSVP required below: