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The Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy

Civic Internship Grant Recipients: 2019-2020

the clough center for the study of constitutional democracy

Lilah Butler

Lilah Butler

Lilah is a rising senior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences studying International Studies and English with a minor in French. Originally from Oregon, she spent her spring semester junior year abroad at Sciences Po, a political science institute in Paris. On campus, she is a member of 4Boston, working with the students of Mattapan Early Elementary School in an afterschool program one day a week. She is involved as well on the e-board of Al Noor, the Middle Eastern Studies Journal, which allowed her to attend the Middle Eastern Studies Association conference for the past two years. Last summer and during the school year Lilah worked as an Undergraduate Research Fellow in the political science department, focusing on political theory and Islamic political philosophy. She belongs to the John Marshall Project Fellowship, an initiative of the political science department which seeks to promote active citizenship and statesmanship through discussion of the nuances of our American democratic and constitutional republic.  

This summer, Lilah will be working in the American Embassy in the Hague, the Netherlands. She is excited to explore the career field of diplomacy and assist in planning and producing events linking the Dutch and American publics. As an intern with the public affairs department she will be working on everything from speech writing to photography and social media posting. The Embassy hosts a variety of events, including educational forums for high school students and speakers such as diplomats and professionals from STEM, government and public policy, and the humanities.  Interning in the Hague will also provide the opportunity to interact with a wide variety of NGOs and international bodies such as the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Interning with the State Department will help Lilah determine whether she wants to work in diplomacy or another aspect of international relations after graduation.


 
Minaldy Cadet

Minaldy Cadet

Minaldy Cadet is a rising Senior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Science from Fort Lauderdale, FL. He double majors in Political Science and Psychology B.A. At BC, Minaldy serves as Big Brother in the BC Bigs program, a Resident Assistant in the sophomore housing community, and a member of the executive board for the Haitian Association culture club. Minaldy co-founded Boston College Active Minds, a mental health club that seeks to spread mental health awareness while fostering a safe space for open-ended discussions on mental health on college campuses.

This Summer, Minaldy will be working as an intern at the office of Catholic Legal Immigration Network. INC (CLINIC) in Silver Springs, MD. The office provides a multitude of programs and network that serve immigrants. Some of the network includes faith-based institutions, farmworker programs, domestic violence shelters, ethnic community-focused organizations, libraries, and other entities. CLINIC tackles problems faced by low-income immigrants and resolved through advocacy, education, pro bono representation, litigation, and media. As an intern, Minaldy will be placed in the communications department. Minaldy will be working on a variety tasks, including, but not limited to: assisting the webmaster with CLINIC’s new website, doing some back-end maintenance on the database, and helping with anticipated public outreach on a variety of immigration-related topics, including Temporary Protected Status and changes in policies about financial obligations related to immigration status.

Minaldy has dedicated his Boston College career to understanding the ever-changing immigration system in the United States. Through his course work and personal experience. Minaldy sees an unfair restriction placed upon children who emigrated to the United States and have remained and completed High School but have yet to hold any permanent residence status. Despite completing most, if not all, of their schooling in America and are American in every way, they are treated as international students should they want to pursue higher education and are not eligible for federal financial aid. The immigration system is complex and low-income immigrants are often the most vulnerable group. Minaldy aims to dedicate his career to serving those low-income immigrants as they are often left without proper guidance and voiceless. He is thrilled to have the opportunity to explore the complexities of immigration further. After college, Minaldy wants to continue his studies by attending law school.


 

Leo Confalone

Leo Confalone

I am a junior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences majoring in Political Science with a minor in Philosophy.

I was born and raised in Washington, D.C. After attending DC Public Schools for most of my life, I enrolled at St. John’s College High School to participate in the De La Salle Scholars Program. I currently live in D.C. along with my family and our three dogs.

From a young age, my parents instilled in me the value of working to make a difference in the lives of others. Growing up in the nation’s capital helped me to develop an appreciation for public service and fostered my aspirations to pursue a career in government. The District has also exposed me to the stark inequalities that exist across our country, even in our government’s backyard, and inspired my passion to seek justice in my professional career.

Throughout my life, I have been fortunate to have opportunities to travel and expand my worldview while developing my interest in international affairs. I spent the summer after my freshman year in Amman, Jordan studying Arabic at the Qasid Institute. I am studying as a Visiting Student at Mansfield College at the University of Oxford for the 2018-2019 academic year.

In the past, I have worked as an intern for Senator Edward J. Markey and Congressman Seth Moulton, both of Massachusetts. At Boston College, I have served as the Vice President of the College Democrats, Opinions Editor of The Heights, and as a Trip Leader in the Appalachia Volunteers Program.

This summer, I will serve as an intern with the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs. In my role, I will provide members of the Majority Staff with policy and administrative support. I will engage in policy research, attend briefings and hearings, and draft memoranda and written materials related to foreign policy and international affairs. I hope to develop a greater understanding of the legislative branch’s role in formulating foreign policy and to learn more about how the United States can promote human rights, freedom, and democracy around the globe.

In the future, I plan to work in the field of diplomacy and international affairs through a career in public service. I believe that the United States should contribute to creating a world that ensures fundamental rights and opportunity for all people. Drawing upon my education and experiences, I hope to one day contribute to this mission.


Kyle Costa

Kyle Costa

This coming fall, I will be entering my fourth year at Boston College. I am a double major in both Political Science and Islamic Civilization and Societies. I am originally from Cincinnati, Ohio. This is where I grew up and lived before making the decision to study in Boston. My decision to start studying Arabic my freshman year has led me on an incredible academic journey that has taken me to two different countries in the Middle East, Lebanon and Jordan. Last summer, I studied in an intensive, Arabic program at the American University of Beirut. This past spring semester, I studied Arabic for four months in Amman, Jordan. Both of these experiences have led me to pursue working with Syrian elementary school students through a non-profit called “al-Jusoor” (“the bridges”) this coming summer.

I was first introduced to this NGO while studying at AUB last summer. I was paired as a language exchange partner with a Syrian man named Noor. During one of my program’s excursions, we visited one of the primary schools in the Bekaa Valley and spent the day with the students there. I had such a great experience that day, I wanted to see how else I could get involved with al-Jusoor.

During the formal school year, Jusoor’s primary goal is to provide remedial primary education so that these students can enter the formal Lebanese public schools and succeed there. The Summer Volunteer Program provides a ‘summer camp’ experience that constitutes a key opportunity these children have to participate in extracurricular activities. 

At the centers, the volunteers will run activities for five days a week for a period of 3 weeks, and each will be paired with an Arabic-speaking Syrian or Lebanese teacher or volunteer. 

During the course of the program, the volunteers will run activities within the classrooms in collaboration with their Arabic-speaking co-facilitators and the larger Jusoor team in Lebanon. Volunteers are also asked to write blog posts about their experience on a regular basis, which will then be shared with the larger Jusoor community.

I know that this program will be an important experience for me as I navigate my way towards achieving my future goals. Besides being an excellent way to retain the colloquial Arabic skills I learned in Amman this past spring semester, al-Jusoor’s summer program will constitute my first experience working in emergency education. This is something I have considered pursuing in the future. For my last year at Boston College, I am planning on applying to a few competitive, national scholarships that would allow me to pursue  my interests related to Arabic. For this reason, al-Jusoor’s summer program will provide me with a critical, learning experience that will shape how I approach my goals related to graduate school and research after my undergraduate years.  


 

John DiBello

John DiBello

I was raised on the north shore of Massachusetts and currently reside there with my parents. As a rising senior at Boston College, I study Biology on the pre-medical track and have an interest in public health and the application of humanities to health and health care. Past and current experiences on campus include: BC Marching Band, Appalachia Volunteers, Liturgy Arts Group, and Arrupe Immersion Program. Off campus, I have worked as an intern at sites including Boston Health Care for the Homeless, Action for Boston Community Development, and Newton Wellesley Hospital.  I spent my past semester living in Quito, Ecuador where I undertook a full course load in Spanish and completed initial investigative work alongside Dr. Iván Palacios, the Director of Global Health at Universidad de San Francisco de Quito Medical School.  I dedicated significant time to the research component of my experience, splitting time between the medical school and the rural town of Pifo, which lies an hour drive outside of the city.

The grant will fund my role as a research and program development intern at USFQ Medical School for six weeks. I will be working full-time under Dr. Palacios to complete data collection and to process data from our two current investigations. The first study focuses on the physical, mental, and social health of the elderly population – defined as 65 years or older – in the town of Pifo. The second study gives focus to the socialization of adult male population of Pifo as well as of three other public health clinic sites: Tumbaco, El Quinche, and Puembo.  Beyond finalizing these reports, I will have three other focuses.  First, I will develop a protocol for a new public health investigation entitled: “Adolescent Male Attitudes Towards Sexual and Reproductive Health.”  We hope to address this often unrecognized population in regards to sexual education and responsibility.  Second, working alongside a visiting medical student, we will assist persons experiencing disability/handicap in the specific community of Checa with an emphasis on affordable solutions and support for caregivers. In addition, we will develop disability-focused, public policy advocacy efforts that could continue through the university and its students.  The final objective is to introduce a pilot program that promotes intergenerational interaction in the community of Lumbisi. Adolescents would be instructed in a variety of enjoyable and healthy practices that they would then share with the local elderly population through a weekly club.

My work will address a variety of interests which will inform my future career. I, as well as Dr. Palacios, believe in the power of community engagement in the pursuit of healthier communities. I plan to pursue a degree in medicine after college, and I recognize the power of social and political conditions as determinants of well-being. My future career considerations include community, geriatric, and women’s health focuses, and my work this summer will allow me to explore each of these themes.


 

Zoe Fanning

Zoe Fanning

Zoe is a rising senior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences majoring in International Studies and minoring in Public Health and the Common Good while on a pre-medical track. She is originally from Portland, Oregon and attended Jesuit High School. At Boston College, she is the Education Chair for the club MEDLIFE, which raises awareness of and advocates for issues relating to global health. She works as an undergraduate research fellow for Professor Jennifer Erickson of BC’s Political Science Department on topics relating to human rights violations and sanctioning, which has played a large role in helping to spur her interest in global conflict and resultant health outcomes. Zoe also serves as a research assistant at the Parkinson Center of Oregon at Oregon Health and Sciences University, where she has been working on a project with their Deep Brain Stimulation treatment. Zoe loves to run, ski, and climb, and loves to spend time with her family and dog, Wallace.

This summer, Zoe will be conducting research in Geneva, Switzerland regarding the effects of armed conflict on civilian health. The international community plays a central role in shaping the treatment of civilians during conflict. In recent cases like Syria, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Yemen, it is clear that essential civilian services like health care have been caught in the crossfire (and in some cases deliberately targeted), making it very difficult for individuals to receive treatment for ongoing conditions or for injuries or diseases sustained from the conflict itself. While the international community and governments themselves have in some cases sought to remedy health care crises in war, how interventions are initiated and what makes their efforts successful, inadequate, or even harmful are not well known. In Switzerland, Zoe will be meeting with leaders and professionals from many international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and universities with the goal of identifying how and why the international community pursues health intervention during conflict and the conditions that result in success or failure.

After graduation, Zoe plans to pursue an MD and an MPH, in order to incorporate these issues into her career as a physician as imperative to adequate health care provision and global equity. Quite simply, without understanding the role of the international community in civilian access to health during war, we will not be able to sustainably improve human security and human rights.

After graduation, Elizabeth will pursue a Masters in Education to begin teaching in public schools across the country. She intends on establishing a teaching career and then pursuing further education in Higher Education or Curriculum Development. She ultimately wants to become involved with policy advocacy. Elizabeth desires to transform the current climate of public education within the country to provide a more equitable education for all students.


 

Anne Marie Green

Anne Marie Green

My name is Anne Marie Green, and I am a rising senior from Baltimore, Maryland. I major in Political Science and minor in Environmental Studies. I intend to pursue a career in environmental policy, and while I am interested in many environmental issues, my specific interests are in plastics and waste management. To explore these areas more in depth, I am writing a Political Science senior honors thesis related to waste policy in the United States and the future of our recycling system. I also work with issues related to waste as the Student Sustainability Intern Manager at BC Dining Sustainability Services. At BC Dining, I have the privilege of working with management, chefs, and student environmental organizations on projects including waste reduction and education campaigns, the Green2Go reusable container program, and the FRESH to Table food sustainability initiative. Last summer, I interned with the Sierra Club Massachusetts Chapter, assisting with advocacy projects, political blogging, and Electric Vehicle campaigns. This past spring, I studied abroad in Christchurch, New Zealand. In addition to spending many weekends camping in the gorgeous New Zealand outdoors, I did an Environmental Systems field camp with Frontiers abroad, and wrote a research manuscript comparing nitrate contamination in groundwater from dairy agriculture in California and New Zealand. In my free time, I enjoy being a member of the BC Women’s Club Squash team, playing the guitar, writing music and practicing photography.

This summer, I am thrilled to work at the City of Boston’s Environment Department, helping with projects to implement the Zero Waste Boston initiative. The initiative was announced last year with the goal of achieving 80% waste diversion from landfills by 2030. My work this summer will include researching the currently fragmented waste policies in the city, so that these can be harmonized into a single city-wide waste ordinance. I will be working with city officials, industry experts and stakeholders to help Boston get on track for zero waste. Proper waste management is critical to maintaining a clean, healthy and equitable society, and I am thrilled to serve the people of Boston in this way. I am so grateful for the Clough Center’s support in my internship this summer, giving me the opportunity not only to improve the Boston community but also to advance my career in environmental work.


 

Gabriella Haedelt

Gabriella Haedelt

Gabriella Haedelt is a rising junior at Boston College from Naples, Florida who is studying Political Science and International Studies. Gabriella is a research assistant for Professor Peter Krause on the Project of National Movements and Political Violence, where she conducts research on the Middle East and political violence while using skills in archival work and content analysis. Gabriella is also a Copy Editor for Kaleidoscope International Journal and the Editor-In-Chief of Fresh Ink Literary Magazine. She was a Policy Analyst on the BC Policy Council as a first-year student and won the Boston College Public Policy Case Competition in 2018. She is a member of EagleMUNC and enjoys developing the Model UN conference hosted for high school students every year in downtown Boston. Gabriella’s interest in public service and law began with two internships at the Legal Aid Service of Collier County in her hometown, where she worked for lawyers specializing in immigration, domestic violence, and other areas of public service.

This summer Gabriella will be a Legislative Intern for Congressman Ben Ray Luján at the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington D.C. While interning on Capitol Hill, Gabriella will be tasked with legislative and administrative responsibilities, including communicating with constituents, conducting policy research, and assisting House staffers with drafting documents on legislation. She will gain an understanding of American Politics and the ways in which our government operates. Concurrently, Gabriella will be conducting independent research on the ways Presidential executive orders condition U.S. energy policy. Gabriella hopes her research will lead to a Senior Thesis on this topic or something similar.

Gabriella’s areas of academic interest are Political Economy, International Relations, and Comparative Politics. She hopes this summer on Capitol Hill will be a springboard to more opportunity for policy work in Washington D.C. once graduated from college. After Boston College, Gabriella plans to attend law school and specialize in International Law and Foreign Policy. She plans to become a U.S. Attorney and later work at the U.S. Department of State.


Ellana Lawrence

Ellana Lawrence

“Ellana, stop asking me! I already said no” is the line my mother would often say to me as a child. As I look back, I have come to realize that phrase was a reflection of my persistent, impatient, and curious nature. If I had my heart set on something, I was going to find a way to attain it. These traits followed me to high school, where I became more active and interested in social justice. My passion for activism started in 2014 when the student body president at my high school decided to have a walkout in protest of the murders of young blacks by police officers. As a school, we protested in the streets of Manhattan, chanting and yelling “Black Lives Matter” and “Hands Up! Don’t Shoot!” I was overwhelmed with contradictory feelings of rage and joy, emptiness and empowerment, unity and loneliness. I felt excited because I was finally taking a stance, but angry because of the daily injustices that young black and brown people face. This was one of the greatest experiences of my life, as it launched me into my activism work. I became more focused on social justice and making a difference in my school community. Since the walkout, I have been selected to attend diversity conferences, ran workshops on race and class, organized assemblies regarding #BlackLivesMatter and mass incarceration, completed many independent projects, including my film entitled Unfound Justice, and received the Princeton Prize in Race Relations Award.

During this time, I also developed a deep love for technology because I was interested in how it works, the effects it has on society, and its role in social movements. After participating in Girls Who Code and the Computer Science Summer Institute at Google in New York City, I decided to major in Information Systems at Boston College. I also decided to minor in Applied Psychology & Human Development, as I knew this would provide a larger context for the activist work that I am doing. Ensuring that I stay focused on giving back while also learning more about the tech industry, I decided to apply to Diive, a program based in Cape Town, South Africa that selects approximately 15 students from around the world to intern for four weeks at tech companies that use data science and blockchain technology to solve various sustainability issues. I was accepted in May and I am now in the process of ranking my top three internship choices, as well as preparing for my trip to Cape Town. I truly could not be more thankful for this opportunity.

In the future, I would like to start an organization that assists low-income POC students with being admitted into higher education schools through providing them with financial help and mentorship. I would also like to continue making films, as I did in high school, that shed light on injustices that are often overlooked, or films that create new narratives within the black community. I firmly believe that media portrayal plays a large role in our biases, so it is imperative that we eradicate stereotypes in hopes to tell accurate and more positive stories. I hope to give back to all of the people who have helped me along the way and ultimately use my voice to expose instances of inequality, as well as create a space for black young women, like myself, to take a stand.


Megi Maci

Megi Maci

Megi Maci is a rising senior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences majoring in Biology with a Medical Humanities minor on the pre-medical track. She was born in Tirana, Albania and moved to Quincy, MA in 2001. Megi is an undergraduate research fellow for BC’s biology department, and she is the new co-president of GlobeMed, a non-profit grassroots organization that works to augment communication between university chapters and overseas partnerships to break down systematic barriers to healthcare. As a junior, Megi served as a Resident Assistant to 32 young women and a Women in STEM mentor to five underclassmen, where she has helped shape these women’s personal and career development during one of the most formative years of their lives. She is also an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) for Boston College EMS, a Leadershape alumna, and a member of Full Swing.

This summer, Megi will be traveling to Tamil Nadu, India to work with the Chinmaya Organization for Rural Development (CORD) in Siruvani, one of the poorest regions in Tamil Nadu. There, she will work alongside CORD director Dr. Meera and community development workers as equitable partners in effecting long-term, sustainable change through public health initiatives. These include waste segregation, female empowerment, a holistic approach to addiction therapy, sanitation, and health promotion. Megi will work in the field to both educate and empower females and children to promote their self-governance and health education for optimistic health outcomes. These education groups fuel Dr. Meera’s clinic by increasing vaccination uptake. Finally, Megi will work with CORD to further their holistic approach to treating patients. Her ultimate goal is to increase intercultural communication between high and low-and-middle income countries in order to optimize patient health outcomes. After she leaves India, Megi will help create a partnership action framework in collaboration with CORD to outline the analyses of current public health initiatives, the benefits, and their effectiveness. The trusted partnership between her and CORD Siruvani ensures that they are continuously working together to further these initiatives for the amelioration of impoverished populations and to eliminate injurious social injustices.

Megi’s post-graduation plans are to attend medical school and to use her BC education, which has seamlessly interwoven her dual passions for medicine and public health, for the common good. Since coming to BC, her dream of becoming a doctor has been fortified by the Jesuit mission of being a woman for others, her Albanian identity, and her love of medicine. Megi is forever grateful to the Clough Center for giving her the means to continue pursuing her dream.


 

Joseph McGrane

Joseph McGrane

My name is Joseph McGrane and I am a rising sophomore studying Political Science and Economics in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences. I was born and raised in Bloomington Minnesota and have chosen to venture out to Boston College to challenge myself academically, socially, and professionally. At BC I am apart of the Emerging Leaders Program, Arrupe
International Immersion Program, 4Boston, and I work in the equipment room in Conte Forum. Some of my interests stemming from my prospective majors and commitments on campus include American politics, nonprofit work, servant leadership, public policy, history, and english. I also am an avid Minnesota sports fan who enjoys playing basketball, soccer, and tennis.

As an intern this summer for the Minnesota Governor’s office in the office Public Engagement, I will be representing Governor Walz and his administration by handling correspondence and helping the state of Minnesota feel more connected, informed, and valued by their government. I will also be given the opportunity to work alongside several state agencies in their efforts to resolve conflicts and concerns brought up by the members of our constituency. Other duties I will perform include helping run public events and outreach around the state. As an intern for the office of Public Engagement, I believe I will gain unique insight on the inner workings of government affairs while simultaneously helping my state reach its fullest potential. By reading and responding to correspondence from constituents of Minnesota like myself, I will be able to give these people the time and attention they deserve as members of a democracy and help amplify their voices and concerns to my state government.

I am in the midst of a deepening process of discernment to determine my future career plans. It is my hope that my internship experience as well as my involvement in the Junior Fellows program will help guide me in this time of questioning and uncertainty. As of this moment, I am interested in working as a public servant for a local or state government or as a part of a nonprofit organization that helps solve certain societal issues in our country such as poverty and economic inequality. I believe that both of these roles require a commitment to service, leadership, and intellectual study in order to be best fulfilled. I am honored to be appointed a Junior Fellow and to receive a Civic Internship Grant for this upcoming academic year and I am certain that my involvement in this program will further my discernment process in many unrivaled ways.


 

Mahima Menghani

Mahima Menghani

Mahima Menghani is a rising junior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences from Waltham, Massachusetts. She is majoring in International Studies with a concentration in Political Economy & Development Studies and a minor in Finance. On campus, she is an undergraduate research fellow for Professor Peter Krause in the Political Science Department. Through her position, she researches historical armed insurgencies, conducts data analysis, and contributes to political science publications. She has also received an Advanced Study Grant for a summer project titled “The Evolution of Geriatric Care in an Industrialized India,” which will explore the sociopolitical consequences of economic development and its impact on the growing demand for a nursing home system in India. Additionally, she is involved in the South Asian Student Association at Boston College and participated in its annual spring Culture Show.

This summer, Mahima will intern with the United States Attorney’s Office of Boston, Massachusetts in the Securities & Financial Fraud Unit (SFF) of the criminal division.  The United States Attorney is a nonpartisan federal law enforcement agency, overseen by the Department of Justice, that is responsible for prosecuting a broad range of crimes that violate federal law. The intention of the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices is not to win every case brought to the table, but rather to exercise justice and to fight for the betterment of the country despite representing the United States as a prosecuting party. The SFF Unit targets perpetrators of white-collar crimes that include tax evasion, fraud, embezzlement, and market manipulation. There, Mahima will assist in the prosecution of economic crimes, aiding Assistant U.S. Attorneys in organizing the case files of businesses and in facilitating legal proceedings. Her responsibilities will involve conducting document reviews, observing courtroom arguments, performing analytical work, and preparing pretrial materials.

Eventually, Mahima hopes to attend law school and to specialize in a field pertaining to her business and public policy interests. The internship program at the U.S. Attorney’s Office provides her with the perfect opportunity to gain exposure to the federal criminal justice system while delving deeper into the judicial process for attaining restitution for taxpayers and victims of financial crimes. She looks forward to serving as a Clough Center Junior Fellow next year and continuing to define her career path.


 

Ingrid Miranda-Paratore

Ingrid Miranda-Paratore

Ingrid Miranda-Paratore is a rising senior in Boston College’s Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences. She is a double major in Economics and International Studies. This past fall semester, she studied abroad in Venice, Italy under the Globalization Program at Venice International University. During her time abroad, she studied how warfare, political instability, and economic turmoil have plagued various parts of the world, specifically the Middle East and Venezuela. In analyzing such issues, she has come to understand the effects they have on international business and trade in both the private and public sectors. Outside of the classroom, Ingrid has pursued her interests in global affairs by assisting Professor Peter J. Krause as a research assistant for his Project on National Movements and Political Violence. As a research assistant, Ingrid edited and reviewed publications as well as provided critical analysis of case studies for future publications.

This summer Ingrid will be interning for the U.S. Department of Commerce in their U.S. Commercial Service Sector, which is the trade promotion sector of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. As an International Trade intern, Ingrid will be involved in projects pertaining to international market research, marketing, and international business counseling. She will also be involved in promoting overseas trade shows, export leads, seminars, and other trade activities to U.S. exporters and partners. Some other responsibilities will be directing inquiries from U.S. exporters regarding trade requirements, regulations, documentation, international marketing strategies, and commodity classification. Additionally, she will attend meetings with local businesses to assess export needs and present her international market research findings to the clients.

Ingrid is very thankful for her BC experience as it has been an instance of learning superimposed on living: the words in her textbooks and from her professors have spread beyond the classroom and she has found their relevance in the everyday. These connections have challenged her to expand her worldview in unexpected ways, which in turn have shaped her values and future goals. Going into her senior year, Ingrid is committed to building a career that directly impacts communities. Whether through a focus on post-conflict crisis and international development through NGOs or work with corporate firms to improve their social responsibility roles, she aspires to apply her knowledge and skill set to improving the world we live in.


 

Cosette Newcomb

Cosette Newcomb

This summer I will be working as an intern for the City of Boston’s Department of Innovation and Technology. With this I will be looking at ways to improve interaction between Boston residents and their local government online and in person through the use of digital technology. I sought to work with the City of Boston as I am from Boston myself and I believe effective change is made by people who are informed and engaged with their government on every level. I was drawn to an internship in the Department of Innovation and Technology specifically as I am a computer science and sociology double major with a passion for social justice. I think knowing how groups function and interact directly correlates with digital technology in this case. By working with the City this summer I will help strengthen a digital platform that facilitates and offers new ways for residents to contact and be involved with the City of Boston. A strong digital platform provides residents better access their government officials, as well as, City sponsored programs and resources. Digital access to one’s government also gives people the materials to have a stronger role in their government in which they feel they can vocalize needed change.

Today the world is incredibly technology oriented and the United States Government, at local and national levels need to be accessible in order to represent and serve all of its people. For this to happen the two need to be in contact, thus our government should be looking to incorporate technology in helpful ways that facilitate and encourage people to be involved and informed citizens which is what my internship this summer will be doing. After this summer I plan to continue to work with non-profit organizations in my future and employ the skills I have learned through my computer science and sociology majors.


 

Sophia Pandelidis

Sophia Pandelidis

My name is Sophia Pandelidis, and I am a rising junior in the International Studies department. I am incredibly honored to have the opportunity to intern for the Council for Court Excellence in Washington, DC this summer, thanks to the generous assistance of the Clough Center. CCE is a non-profit, non-partisan organization working towards justice reform in DC area. CCE prides itself in being committed to systemically improving the justice system, promoting equality, and ensuring liberty. As a policy intern, I hope to get an inside look at CCE’s various areas of expertise in Civil, Criminal, and Youth Justice as well as Justice Education. Two of my general responsibilities will be primary and secondary research of the local and federal justice system as well as the development of legislation. Interns at CCE are also responsible for creating public education guides that increase the public’s understanding of the civil, criminal, and juvenile justice systems.

My interest in the justice system began last summer, when I read the poignant book, Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson, which focuses on death row in Alabama. The egregious injustices and appalling racial inequality that exists in the “justice system” were both shocking and devastating to me. However, Stevenson and his team were the most inspiring parts of the book, for they persevered in the face of repeated failure and refused to give up their belief in human dignity. This is what made me realize that working in justice reform may be something I want to pursue. I will have the opportunity to engage with the experts at CCE, which will allow me to learn more about career advancement in the field. I hope to explore pathways to both law and non-profit management over the summer—inspiration is key!

Outside the classroom, I love singing, playing guitar, dancing, and hiking around my native New England. At Boston College, I am part of the Acoustics, an a cappella group, and I am a leader in the International Assistants program. Thank you again to the Clough Center for making this summer possible!


 

Charlie Power

Charlie Power

Charlie Power is a rising junior in the Carroll School of Management, concentrating in Economics and minoring in Theology. He is a member the Carroll School of Management Honors Program. On campus, he is a part of the Student Organization Funding Committee, a group of students that oversees the budgeting process of over 200 on-campus student organizations, and also works as an undergraduate research fellow in the Theology department.

This summer, Charlie will be interning with La Chispa in Mexico City. As an NGO, one of La Chispa’s core concerns is a focus on social entrepreneurship. In other words, La Chispa not only seeks business success as it has been conventionally measured, but the organization also wants to certify that the entrepreneurs it works with have a clear and articulable mission about how their product or service betters their community. La Chispa accomplishes these goals by functioning as a startup accelerator--taking in new businesses, training, mentoring, and working with founders. La Chispa offers expertise--whether financial, strategic, or marketing--and believes that members of local communities are best empowered through owning and running their own businesses, spreading economic opportunity and building more cohesive communities.

In eight weeks at La Chispa, Charlie will be working on three main objectives. The first is to increase the quantity and quality of social impact entrepreneurs applying to La Chispa’s training programs. Further, he will help train La Chispa’s newest recruited entrepreneurs. While these businessmen and women have proposals and new ideas that La Chispa believes have the potential to positively impact local neighborhoods in Mexico City, these entrepreneurs need advice on how to go from ideation to actualization, from planning to execution. Charlie, along with La Chispa staff, will be running entrepreneurship boot camps designed to fast-track this process. Finally, he will be working with La Chispa’s entrepreneurs who have already been trained by the organization, which on a day to day level will consist of advising them on strategic matters: how to grow their businesses, evaluating their current market, and customer acquisition strategies.

During his next two years at BC, he is interested in attempting to practice more discernment with regards to careers after college. At this point, possible interests going into consulting or applying to law school. 


 

Lauren Rabbottini

Lauren Rabbottini

I am Lauren Rabbottini, a rising sophomore at Boston College. Currently, I am majoring in Biology and minoring in Global Public Health for the Common Good. This summer I spent approximately 3 weeks interning with CORD Siruvani in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. CORD stands for the Chinmaya Organization for Rural Development and is a grassroots non-profit organization that works to create sustainable and holistic public health initiatives that attack the root causes of health disparities in rural communities. During my internship, I observed how CORD addresses and helps solve various health related issues in the community. I spent the majority of my time working with Doctor Meera who is our contact at CORD. With Doctor Meera, our team evaluated current public health initiative and investigated unaddressed health issues present in the community. One of the larger initiatives I attended were the weekly Mahila Mandals, which are female empowerment groups for the community. These meetings not only helped provide CORD with information on the health of the women and the impact of their current initiatives in the community but also acted as a support system and a resource that provides concrete strategies and services. Mahila Mandals represent just part of the work that CORD does to improve the overall wellbeing of the community, as various initiatives focused on addressing communicable diseases in the population, on providing resources to improve access to sustainable sources of income, etc. In the future, I plan on using my knowledge of working with communities to create and implement sustainable and comprehensive public health initiatives. I hope to work in the field of Global Public Health where I will investigate outbreaks and health problems at the community level and will work with community leaders and public health officials to establish policies to help eradicate disease and health disparities. This work will hopefully be coupled with my own research in the fields of biology and global health, where I plan on investigating infectious diseases and the health of vulnerable populations. Ultimately, I aspire to combine my formal education and scientific background with my real work experiences to investigate and understand the effects of social determinants on the health of populations and work to diminish their presence and effects.


 

Harry Shanmugam

Harry Shanmugam

Harry Shanmugam is a rising junior from Hopkinton, MA in the Carroll School of Management, concentrating in Accounting for Finance and Consulting and pursuing a double major in Biology on the pre-medical track. He is a member of the Gabelli Presidential Scholars Program.

At BC, Harry serves as Vice President of Boston College’s travelling Model United Nations team, and is on the executive board of GlobeMed, a public health advocacy group, and the Fulton Leadership Society, a leadership development organization for CSOM students. He is a panelist for the Student Admissions program and is involved in Consult Your Community, an organization which provides pro-bono consulting services to Boston-area startups. Harry is an undergraduate research fellow under Professor Summer Hawkins, conducting research on the effects of prescription drug policy on adolescent drug use, and a member of Dr. Philip Landrigan’s research team studying the effects of ocean pollution on human health. Last summer, Harry worked in Tamil Nadu, India as an intern at the Chinmaya Organization for Rehabilitation and Development, a grassroots public health and rural development non-profit organization. Harry serves on the Boston Ryan White Part A Planning Council, responsible for allocating federal funds to HIV/AIDS service agencies in the Greater Boston area.

This summer, Harry will be at the National Institute of Public Health (Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, INSP) as a visiting student researcher. The INSP serves as the primary apparatus of public health research for the Mexican government, and its publications and findings often constitute the basis and impetus for much of Mexican health policy. Harry will be working under the supervision of Dr. Lizbeth

López-Carrillo to study the carcinogenic effects of heavy metals on Mexicans and the relevant policy implications, with the goal of publishing a research-policy paper summarizing exposure-outcome findings and providing a policy proposal for the new Obrador government in Mexico.

After graduation, Harry hopes to go to medical school and pursue a career that combines clinical work  with epidemiology and public policy. Since coming to BC, he has been challenged to think broadly in terms of ways he can work to further the common good. He is profoundly grateful for the Clough Center’s support and is excited to learn more about applied public health and public policy this summer.

Upon graduation, she aims to find work which interacts with the governmental and non-profit sectors both. Her dream is to start off by working in outside of the United States, doing research concerning gender issues. However, she hopes that eventually, she will have the opportunity to be involved in the U.S. foreign policy as well. After obtaining her Bachelor's degree, she will be taking a couple years to work before applying to Law School, where she will most likely be focusing on international law.


 

Sydney Shugrue

Sydney Shugrue

Sydney Shugrue is a rising Senior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences from Chicago, Illinois.  She majors in International Studies with a concentration in cooperation and conflict and is minoring in English.  At Boston College Sydney has been selected as Co-Editor in Chief of Kaleidoscope International Journal, BC’s undergraduate staffed international affairs publication.  Additionally, she is an undergraduate research assistant in the Political Science Department and is a member of the Boston College Symphonic Band.  Sydney is being published in an upcoming issue of BC’s Medical Humanities Journal.  During the Fall of 2018, Sydney interned with McAdam Financial Group in Boston, focusing on marketing and digital communication.   She just returned from semester study abroad in Rome, Italy where she gained a new perspective on how European countries interact in the world.

This summer Sydney will be working as an intern at the Cook County State’s Attorney’s office in Chicago, Illinois.  The Cook County State’s Attorney’s office is the second largest prosecutor’s office in the nation and is responsible for the prosecution of all misdemeanor and felony crimes committed in Cook County, one the largest counties in the U.S.  The office Sydney will be working in has 30 court rooms and handles all aspects of more than 30,000 felony cases and several hundred thousand misdemeanor cases each year.  Her responsibilities will include conducting legal research for pre-trial motions and trials.  She also will aid Assistant State’s Attorneys in obtaining and copying Discovery for distribution to defense counsel and use online tools to obtain video footage from Chicago Police Body Worn and Squad Car Dash cameras. Additional duties include burning DVDs of video footage for use in court and distribution to defense and organizing case files for attorney use during court call. She also will obtain documents, such as Certified Copies of Conviction, from the Clerk’s office.

Sydney is hoping to gain first-hand experience about the structure and function of our criminal justice system.  She anticipates participating actively in all aspects of criminal prosecutions, obtaining critical insight into the operations of a major prosecutor’s office.

Sydney plans to pursue a degree in law with a focus on international justice.


 

Janani Sundaresan

Janani Sundaresan

My name is Janani Sundaresan and I am originally from Potomac, Maryland. Currently, I am a rising junior pursuing a B.S. in Biology in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences! At BC outside of my courses, I work at the Women’s Center as a staff member and help lead BC’s Bystander Intervention program. I am also part of Globemed’s executive board which has fostered an immense amount of dedication and continued passion for learning to work against barriers to healthcare. On Globemed’s e-board I am the GROW Internship Coordinator so I will be leading this year’s internship at our partner organization CORD Siruvani in Tamil Nadu, India.

One of the main resources that CORD provides for the Siruvani community are weekly clinics that offer essential medical care such as vaccinations and Pap smears. To address environmental health determinants, CORD has constructed outhouses in the villages to combat the persistent problem of open defecation. Removal of waste from the public can prevent communicable diseases, reducing the need for later medical care. CORD also provides reusable trash bags and biodegradable cutlery so collecting garbage does not create another health risk. CORD addresses the social determinants of health with Mahila Mandals (women empowerment groups) and counseling services. The empowerment groups are a support system for women struggling with similar issues and a resource that provides concrete strategies and services.

CORD operates through grassroots partnerships that establish trusting relationships and pave the way for sustainable change while emphasizing equitable participation between groups. My role as coordinator will be to support community members in what they need at the time and to learn from their extensive knowledge of leading a grassroots initiative that really impacts the root problems that impact marginalized groups in the community. I will also able to be observe and evaluate he programs in place to see how to improve them with the community members. We highly value productive and empowering partnerships that are in place to first and foremost positively affect the people seeking high quality and equal access to health care and resources. As an Indian American woman studying public health, I see it as an opportunity and a responsibility to increase awareness around these public health disparities especially those that affect women, who are central to the health of families and the prosperity of every community. I hope to use this opportunity to expand my experience with working in the public health field and empowering communities that have experienced internal or external oppression.

After graduating, I hope to go to medical school and use my education and training to serve communities that are marginalized in the US through providing health care resources and care. I am very grateful for the Clough Center’s support with this project!


 

 

Emma Wallace

Emma Wallace

Emma Wallace is a rising senior at Boston College from Montclair, New Jersey. She is majoring in Economics and minoring in International Studies and Management and Leadership. This past semester, Emma studied abroad in Seville, Spain, at the Pablo de Olavide University in its Spanish Studies Program. At Boston College, the main student organizations that Emma is a part of are the Student Admissions Program, Eagle Volunteers, and Subturri, the Boston College yearbook committee.

This summer, Emma is working as a congressional intern at the United States House of Representatives in Washington, D.C. She is extremely excited to apply her skills and knowledge to this new work environment and gain valuable work experience in this career field. For this internship, Emma will have an array of tasks and responsibilities in support of the functioning of the office, including responding to constituent telephone inquiries and logging those into the office database and handling other office staffing needs. She is additionally responsible for arranging and giving tours of the United States Capitol building to constituents, attending and taking notes on legislative briefings on behalf of staff members, and drafting briefing documents and press releases. She will also be assisting with constituent correspondence, legislative research, and other special projects over the course of her ten-week internship as assigned. All the work that Emma does will be to ensure that the office runs smoothly and efficiently and that she helps staff in any way possible.

As for future career plans, public policy and international business are two potential career fields that Emma is considering at this point. Working at the House of Representatives will give her a good first-hand look at the nexus between public policy and how the legislative process works and will be a good foundation for either of these fields. Emma is also considering working for a government organization, and this internship will give good exposure to and provide transferable skills to transitioning into such a role.


 

Stephanie Walsh

Stephanie Walsh

Stephanie Walsh is a rising senior from Norwalk, Connecticut. She is an honors student in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences with a major in Political Science and a minor in English. On campus, Stephanie is a captain of the mock trial team and will be working as Writing Specialist with the English department’s Writing Center Pilot. This summer, Stephanie will be returning to Washington, D.C. to work for the Administrative Office of the United States Federal Courts. The Administrative Office of the United States Federal Courts (the AO) is an administrative agency that provides financial, legal, legislative, managerial, technological, and programmatic support to the Judicial Conference and to all levels of the federal judiciary. While she was interning at the AO last summer, Stephanie gained valuable experience working with the Judicial Conference Committee on Court Administration (CACM). This summer, she is thrilled to accept a new position as an intern in the Office of Public Affairs. The AO’s Office of Public Affairs address all inquiries from Congress, the media, and the public. Additionally, the Office also manages all of the federal Judiciary’s web, video production services, and social media presence. She will have similar tasks as last summer, which range from research to customer service to data management. For example, she will maintain case files; prepare and analyze reports; proofread, revise, and edit documents; support web contents; and assist with liaison matters for Judiciary committees and subcommittees. She will also have new responsibilities, which will include composing press releases and memos, attend public outreach events, work with civics education projects, build the Administrative Office’s website, and improve the Administrative Office’s social media presence. Excited to explore Washington, D.C. and to learn more about the federal judicial process, Stephanie looks forward to gaining government-related skills and experience. She hopes to attend law school soon after graduation.