Courses

Check the Office of Student Services Course Information and Schedule site for up-to-date course descriptions, faculty, meeting times, and room assignments.

Required Courses

Course Description Department Professor Time
Introduction to Feminisms
Cross listed
Description: Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors. Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major.

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.
Cross listed           Pfeffer T Th
4:30–5:45 p.m.
Introduction to Feminisms
Cross listed
Description: Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors. Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major.

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.
Cross listed Murphy M W
3:00–4:15 p.m.

Spring 2019 Undergraduate Electives

Course Description Department Professor Time
Rhetoric of Social Inequality in America   Communication Celeste Wells T Th
1:30–2:45 p.m.
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference   Communication Brett Ingram T Th
Noon–1:15 p.m.
Gender, Identity, and Sexuality   Communication Carolyn Salvi T Th
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Economics of the Family   Economcis Claudia Olivetti M W
8:30–9:45 a.m.
Advanced Topic Seminar: Toni Morrison   English Rhonda Frederick T Th
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Contemporary American Women Writers   English Laura Tanner T Th
4:30–5:45 p.m.
Identity and Inequality in US History   History Andrew Jewett T Th
4:30–5:45 p.m.
Gender, Family, and Childhood in US History   History Marilynn Johnson T Th
Noon–1:15 p.m.
Women & Gender in Islam   Islamic Civilization & Societies Natana Delong-Bas M W F
11:00–11:50 a.m.
Gender and Society   Sociology Samantha Eddy T Th
3:00–4:15 p.m.
Deviance and Social Control   Sociology Kyle Carr T Th
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race, Class, and Gender   Sociology Cedric-Michael Simmons T Th
1:30–2:45 p.m.
Black Intimacy and Intersectionality Summary: Using Black bodies as a focal point, this course examines the intersections of race and sexuality in the US on both interpersonal and national levels. We explore how intimate relationships and spaces ? e.g., friendships, romantic relationships, neighborhoods, and schools ? both shape and are shaped by larger discourses and the material realities of race and gender. Topics covered include: the historical roots of contemporary stereotypes, religion and spirituality, acknowledged and imposed identities, family and sex education, as well as hip-hop and popular culture. We investigate racial anxieties and the ways in which intimacy can both reproduce and challenge inequality. Sociology Clifton McGuffey T Th
1:30–2:45 p.m.
Constructing Deviance: Power, Control, Resistance This course examines the historical production, policing, and change of boundaries between normative social life and that condemned as “deviant.” To deviate from powerful norms is to risk being repetitively “othered” by social control agents of various sorts — parents, priests, judges, doctors, and politicians. Who wins and who loses in this battle? Animated by a concern for social justice, the course invites students to reckon with how gendered, racialized, economic, and erotic rituals of power influence the contested construction of dominant and deviant expressions of religion, law, medicine, kinship, governance, commerce, bodily pleasure, and popular culture. Sociology Steven Pfohl T Th
1:30–2:45 p.m.
Social Theory This course focuses on the major lines of classical sociological theory, especially the writings of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. The application of these theoretical foundations to contemporary problems (racism, gender inequality, LGBTQ rights, Islamophobia) will draw on commentary from multiple media sources. Sociology Eve Spangler T Th
3:00–4:15 p.m.
Gender, Sexuality, and Athletics   Sociology Kyoung-Yim Kim TBD
Gender, Health, and Inequality   Sociology Lara Birk T Th
4:30–5:45 p.m.
Portraits of Parenthood in 19th-20th Century Spain This course examines evolving notions of parenthood and parenting in Spain from the 19th century to the present. Drawing on a range of theories, from the psychoanalytical to the sociological, we will trace the evolution of archetypes such as the absentee father or the selfless mother, paying particular attention to how gender, race, and class shape societal expectations of parents. Class texts will include everything from poetry to propaganda posters and recent television. Sociology Wan Tang T Th
3:00–4:15 p.m.
Cross Currents Seminar: Thinking about Gender This seminar course will ask students to discuss the social construction of gender and how it relates to their lives. Discussions will examine how gender is developed in contemporary social, cultural, and political structures. Students will recognize ways in which gender and other dimensions of identity intersect and how gender role conflict emerges within people?s lives. Through readings, conversations, and reflective writing, students will link their academic experience to their personal lives by reflecting on gender roles, sexuality, faith, and the life of a college student. The seminar will culminate with the writing of a gendered history. UNAS TBD TBD
Queer Cinema/Queer Theory   English Kevin Ohi T Th
4:30–5:45 p.m.
Sexuality and Society   Sociology Jaclyn Carroll T Th
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Spirituality and Sexuality   Theology John McDargh Th
10:00 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Contemporary Francophone Women Writers   French Regine Jean-Charles W
3:00–5:20 p.m.
The Witch, the Church, and the Law During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a convergence of political, social, and religious movements produced thousands of trials for crimes of witchcraft, sorcery, and superstition throughout Europe and in North America. This course explores these trials, particularly emphasizing their legal and ecclesiastical aspects. Related issues of popular belief in sorcery, magic, and diabolical activity will also be considered. Attention will be devoted to the question of why women were so frequently among the accused. History Virginia Reinburg T Th
Noon–1:15 p.m.
The Women's Voice in Italian Literature and Culture   Italian Deborah Contrada W
3:00–5:20 p.m.
Early Spanish American Women Writers   Spanish Sarah Beckjord T Th
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Women and the Church   Theology Mary Ann Hinsdale T
4:30–6:50 p.m.

Previous Semesters