Courses

Required Courses


Department Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
SOCY Advanced Topics: Transnational Feminisms 559301 Hesse-Biber W 3-5:30pm
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
COMM Advanced Topics 494101 Cuklanz M 3-5:20pm
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Cross-listed Introduction to Feminisms Cross-listed Murphy TTh 4:30-5:45pm

SOCY222501/HIST250201/COMM222501/ENGL212501

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

Cross-listed Introduction to Feminisms Cross-listed Pfeffer MW 3-4:15pm

HIST250202/COMM222502/SOCY222502/ENGL212502

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

 


ELECTIVES

Department

Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
AADS Gender and Slavery 224301 Copeland Th 3-5:20
Discussions of slavery have focused upon the enslaved males' roles and responses. To gain a more complete picture of the complex social interactions and political and social consequences of slavery, we will examine it from the enslaved female's perspective as well. This course focuses upon women's labor, their roles in family life, the plantation community, and how gender informed the style and types of resistance in which men and women engaged. We will also discuss the effects of white paternalism upon gender roles in the slave communities and white female responses to the effects of slavery upon their lives.
APSY Gender Roles 324801 Mahalik W 4:30-6:50pm
This course examines biological, social, and psychological factors that interact in contributing to men's and women's gender roles. Within the social domain, particular attention will be given to how culture affects the social construction of gender, and how factors such as racism and homophobia interact with societally prescribed norms for men and women. The second half of the class will focus on the effects of gender roles on mental and physical health, social problems like aggression, and issues in education, work, and relationships including family life.
CLAS Gender & Sexuality in Ancient Rome 227001 Sutherland MWF 12-12:50
In this course, we will examine Roman views on gender and sexuality during a period covering approximately 200 BCE to 200 CE. We will use literature, epigraphy, and material culture to reconstruct what the ideals of behavior were for Roman men and women, what constituted deviation from these ideals, and how real Romans may actually behaved.
COMM Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference  218001 Ingram  TTh 12-1:15pm

Cross-listed as SOCY336801

This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective. We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about ?acceptable? masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys.

ENGL New Woman in British and Irish Victorian Fiction 440801 Murphy T/Th 9-10:15am
The late nineteenth century saw the flowering of the ?New Woman? movement in fiction. It coincided to a degree with First-Wave feminism and the struggle for women?s suffrage. It had literary debts to contremporary writers such as the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen but also to women writers over the previous century from Maria Edgeworth to George Eliot. This course explores those roots while also attending to the work of some of the seminal New-Woman novelists themselves who came from Irish as well as British backgrounds. They include Olive Schreiner, Sarah Grand, Iota, Mona Caird and George Egerton.
ENGL Victorian Inequality 333101 Hunt MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m.
From ?Dickensian? workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain during an era of revolution and reaction, industrialization and urbanization, and empire building. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor. We will read novels, poetry, and nonfiction prose; authors include Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Elizabeth Gaskell; Charles Dickens; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Prince; Arthur Morrison; and Thomas Hardy.
HIST Gender & Violence in American History 347901 Johnson Th 3-5:25pm
Gender-based violence has a long history in the United States, one that has been shaped by changing gender norms, racial ideologies, and class relations. This course will look at the history of rape and sexual violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how definitions of those offenses have changed over time. By examining several key historical cases, we will explore the experiences of accusers, assailants, and third parties, while assessing the impact of feminism, nativism, and white supremacy in the outcomes. During the course of the semester, students will use primary sources to write a major research paper analyzing a historical case or topic of their own choosing.
HIST Gender in American History 445301 Lyerly MWF 3-3:50pm
This course will explore changing and competing conceptions of manhood, womanhood, and gender relations in American history. Particular attention will be paid to the ways various constructions of gender have served the interests of a race, ideology, or class in American history, the relational nature of gender roles, and the ways prevailing gender ideals influenced men's and women's experiences in America.
HIST Women in U.S. Medicine 284501 Tonn MWF 12-12:50pm
This course surveys the history of women in U.S. medicine from the colonial period to the present. We will consider both the changing place of women within the medical profession and the development of medical knowledge about women's health and disease. How have women practiced medicine as traditional healers, midwives, nurse, physicians, and caregivers? What is the historical relationship between women medical practitioners and the production of medical knowledge about the female body? We will pay particular attention to the structural inequalities within the American medical profession and healthcare system; intersectional approaches to women's history of medicine; and the important role that practitioners, feminists, and patients have played in challenging race and gender based discrimination in medicine as well as gendered assumptions about the female body.
HIST Women and War 348701 Oh W 3-5:25pm
Band of Brothers. The Things They Carried. Apocalypse Now. All Quiet On the Western Front. War is typically depicted as an almost completely male experience, fought by men and men alone. But where are the women? In this course we will explore how gender structures, how people experience war, and how societies wage and understand war, by studying the experiences of women in conflict zones (as combatants, nurses, sex workers, journalists, refugees) and on the home front. After examining cases from around the world in the 20th century students will research and write papers based on topics of their own choice.
ICSP Women and Gender in Islam 331001 Delong-Bas MWF 11am-11:50am

Cross-listed as THEO550001

This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status

SLAV Gender and War in Eastern Europe 206701 TBD TTH 1:30-2:45
A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.
SOCY Gender, Identity, and Sexuality 2181801 Salvi TTH 9am-10:15am

Cross-listed as COMM218101

This course aims to provide an introduction and foundation to the field of gender and sexuality studies. The course will explore the relationship between sex, gender, sexuality, and identity, while also looking at the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, culture, and other positionalities. The course will review the history of gender and sexuality studies, the social construction of identities, the power and privilege of certain identities, the impact of media and popular culture on our understanding of identity, as well as the social movements and future of the LGBTQ+ populations and other identities.

SOCY Inequality in America 107201 Spangler TTH 1:30-2:45
This course examines class inequity in American society. It not only describes how the rich, the poor, and the middle classes live, but also how they relate to one another. Topics include the strategies used by the rich for maintaining the status quo, the hopes cherished by the middle class for improving their position, and the obstacles that keep the poor in their place. Students can choose between readings that emphasize the dynamics of inequality as they are enacted by men or women, and by people of color or Caucasians. 
SOCY Deviance and Social Control 103001 Pfohl TTH 10:30-11:45am
This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms. 
SOCY Gender and Society 102401 Comley TTH 9am-10:15am
This course explores the formation, experience, and change of women's and men's social lives in history. Topics include (1) gendered differences in the organization of power, kinship, economic well-being, race, national identity, and ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and culture; (2) socialization into masculine and feminine social roles; (3) the impact of global economic and technological change on social constructions of gender; (4) gender, popular culture, and the mass media; (5) gender equality and social justice.
SOCY Growing Up Gendered: Contemporary Media Representation 170501 Cuklanz MWF 2-2:50pm
This course explores how conventional and unconventional views of feminine and masculine behaviors for children, adolescents and adults have been circulated in current popular culture through television, film, and advertising over the past two decades. Starting with an examination of children's media, the course will examine how have different theorists and popular media have created and analyzed patterns of representation related to gender, identity, and cultural expectations. Throughout the course we will explore how the categories of gender and sexuality intersect with other dimensions of individual identity such as race, class, and religion. The course will examine a range of commonly gendered themes in popular culture, including sports culture, girlhood, eating disorders, consumerism, romance/bromance, and gendered violence.
SOCY Growing up Gendered: Socio-Cultural Perspectives 170801 Hesse-Biber MWF 1-1:50pm
To what extent is anatomy destiny? We discuss key concepts of sex vs. gender. We delve into the critical societal forces that normalize a gender binary ?male? and ?female.? We address biological, sociological and psychological frameworks that maintain the sex/gender binary across the life cycle (childhood through adulthood). How is our gendered identity constructed? What impacts do families, schools, the mass media and our social relationships on and off-line reinforce or challenge our gender identity? Our sexuality? How does our gender and sexual identity intersect with other dimensions of individual identity such as race, class, ethnicity and sexual preferences? We examine the cultural pressures on women to be slender and men to be muscular body and ways in which conformity to these body image ideals can lead to eating disorders and gendered violence. The class includes lectures, small group discussions, and group reflection projects.
SOCY Reproduction and Reproductive Justice 337401 Diamond-Brown F 9am-12pm
Reproduction is biological and social, local and global, personal and political. In this course we will ask: how does society shape people's options and experiences of reproduction? We will examine the relationship between self, body, and society through topics such as: conception, pregnancy, infertility, abortion, birth, surrogacy, reproductive technology, and aging. We will analyze these through a reproductive justice lens, noting how intersecting inequalities of gender, race, class and sexuality affect the politics of reproduction and reproductive governance. This course will primarily focus on the US but will also include a global comparative perspective.
SOCY Mental Illness and Society 331401 Birk MW 1:30-2:45pm
Psychiatric disorders are commonly viewed through a purely biomedical and/or a psychological framework. In this course, we will apply a sociological imagination to the topic and interrogate the ways in which mental illness, often seen as a supremely private "personal trouble, is also a "public issue." We will read the works of both classic and contemporary scholars, but we will also use memoirs and films to sensitize us to the experience of mental illness itself. We will explore mental illness as a social construction, stigma, labeling theory, as well as issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality in mental illness.