Speakers

Dany Bahar

Dany Bahar

Dany Bahar, an Israeli and Venezuelan economist, is a David. M. Rubenstein Fellow at the Brookings Institution.  He received his Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard University. His research sits at the intersection of international economics and economic development, with a focus on the gains from international migration. Dr. Bahar is also an associate at the Harvard Center for International Development, and a research affiliate at both CESifo Group Munich and IZA Institute of Labor Economics. He has worked and consulted for multilateral development organizations such as the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank.

Kathleen Bailey

Kathleen Bailey

Kathleen Bailey is a double eagle, having received both her Bachelor’s and Ph.D. from Boston College. Dr. Bailey is a Political Science professor, Associate Director of the Islamic Civilization and Societies Program, and Co-Director of the Gabelli Presidential Scholars Program. Her research interests lie in the area of ethnic and regional politics with a focus on the former Soviet space, especially Uzbekistan and Central Asia. She is the author of the forthcoming Clan and Politics in Uzbekistan. Professor Bailey teaches courses on Muslim regions, including Central Eurasia, the Middle Civilization and the Balkans. Her current research focuses on leadership and regional elites in Central Asia.


Ali Banuazizi

Ali Banuazizi

Dr. Ali Banuazizi is currently the Director of the Program in Islamic Civilization and Societies (ICS) and Chair of the International Studies Academic Advisory Board at Boston College. He is a former President of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) and the International Society for Iranian Studies (ISIS). He has held visiting appointments at Princeton, Harvard, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, M.I.T., and Oxford University. He earned a Bachelor’s from the University of Michigan, a Master’s from the New School of Social Research, and a Ph.D. from Yale University. His scholarly interests include political cultures of the Middle East; comparative study of religion, civil society, and politics in the Middle East; and Iran’s social history and contemporary domestic politics and foreign relations.

Sasha Chanoff

Sasha Chanoff

Sasha Chanoff is the founder and executive director of RefugePoint, a humanitarian organization that finds lasting solutions for the world’s most at risk refugees and supports the humanitarian community to do the same. He is the co-author of From Crisis to Calling: Finding Your Moral Center in the Toughest Decisions with a foreword by David Gergen. Prior to launching RefugePoint in 2005, he worked with UN agencies across Africa. He is a recipient of the 2018 Schwab Foundation World Economic Forum Social Entrepreneur of the Year Award, the Charles Bronfman Humanitarian Prize, the Harvard Center for Public Leadership Gleitsman International Activist Award, and is a White House Champion of Change.  Sasha has received social entrepreneur fellowships from the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, Ashoka, and Echoing Green. He serves on the steering committee of New England International Donors and is an human rights advisor to the Leir Charitable Foundation, and an advisor to the Good Lie Fund, the philanthropic arm of the Warner Bros. film, The Good Lie.  He holds a B.A. from Wesleyan University and an M.A. in Humanitarian Assistance, from The Tufts University Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He lives in Somerville, Massachusetts with his wife and two children.


Kristin Heyer

Kristin Heyer

Kristin Heyer is a professor of theology at Boston College. She taught for twelve years at Loyola Marymount University and Santa Clara University prior to attending Boston College in 2015, where she ultimately received her Ph.D. in theological ethics. Her research interests include social ethics, migration ethics, and Catholic social thought. Heyer is an author of several books including Conscience and Catholicism: Rights, Responsibilities and Institutional Responses, Kinship Across Borders: A Dynamic Tension between Faith and Power. She has also published articles in Theological Studies, Catholic Higher Education and Health Care Ethics in USA.

An Le

An Le

An Le is the Policy and Communications Advisor for the Boston Mayor's Office for Immigrant Advancement, which implements Mayor Martin J. Walsh’s vision for promoting the empowerment and integration of Boston's diverse cultural and linguistic communities. Since 2016, he has also served as an adjunct professor for the Boston College School of Social Work. He holds JD and MSW degrees from Boston College and a BA in Social Ecology from the University of California, Irvine.


Maryanne Loughry

Maryanne Loughry

Dr. Maryanne Loughry is a research professor in the School of Social Work at Boston College and a research associate of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford. Dr. Loughry began her work with Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in 1988 as a psychologist in detention centers and refugee camps in Southeast Asia, and presently chairs JRS’s international advisory council on staff well being. She has served as a member of the Australian Government's Minister of Immigration's Advisory Council on Asylum Seekers and Detention (MCASD) and serves on the Governing Committee of the International Catholic Migration Committee (ICMC). She is presently researching the effects of climate-induced displacement in the Pacific. In 2010 she was awarded the Order of Australia (AM) for service to displaced persons.

Gideon Maltz

Gideon Maltz

Gideon Maltz is the Executive Director of the Tent Partnership for Refugees. He previously served as deputy chief of staff to Ambassador Samantha Power at the U.S. mission to the United Nations; director of human rights rights and multilateral affairs at the U.S. National Security Council; and the senior advisor to the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development. Prior to government service, Gideon worked as an attorney in the international trade practice of Hogan Lovells and as a consultant at McKinsey & Company. He has also served as a Junior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and as a Predoctoral Fellow at Stanford’s Center for Democracy, Development, and Rule of Law. Maltz received his B.A. from Yale University, and his J.D. from Stanford University Law School.


Layla Mohamed

Layla Mohamed

Since fleeing her home in the Somali region of eastern Ethiopia amid civil war in 2003, Layla Mohamed has relocated to the United States with her husband. After traveling through many countries, Mohamed has settled in Portland, ME. She now works for Catholic Charities Maine, an organization whose mission is to provide help, hope, and justice for all Mainers. Catholic Charities has brought help to Maine’s most vulnerable people, regardless of faith, since 1966, operating under and spreading the RICHES values - Respect, Integrity, Compassion, Hospitality, Excellence and Stewardship.

Erik Owens

Erik Owens

Erik Owens is director of the International Studies Program and associate professor of the practice in theology at Boston College. His research and teaching explores a variety of intersections between religion and public life, with particular attention to issues of citizenship and political ethics in global contexts, and the challenge of fostering the common good in religiously diverse societies. He is the co-editor of three books: The Sacred and the Sovereign: Religion and International Politics; Gambling: Mapping the American Moral Landscape; and Religion and the Death Penalty: A Call for Reckoning. At the American Academy of Religion, Owens chairs the Committee on the Public Understanding of Religion and leads its Public Scholars Program in partnership with several academic centers and non-partisan institutions. Before leading the International Studies Program, he served as associate director of Boston College’s Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life. Owens received his Ph.D. in religious ethics from the University of Chicago, an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and a B.A. from Duke University.


David Phillips

David Phillips

David L. Phillips is Director of the Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Phillips has worked as a senior adviser to the United Nations Secretariat and as a foreign affairs expert and senior adviser to the U.S. Department of State. He has also worked as Executive Director of Columbia University’s International Conflict Resolution Program, Director of American University’s Program on Conflict Prevention and Peace-building, Fellow at Harvard University’s Future of Diplomacy Project Fellow, Visiting Scholar at Harvard University’s Center for Middle East Studies, and Professor of Preventive Diplomacy at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. He served as a senior fellow and deputy director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Center for Preventive Action, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council of the United States, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, director of the European Centre for Common Ground, project director at the International Peace Research Institute of Oslo, president of the Congressional Human Rights Foundation, and executive director of the Elie Wiesel Foundation. Mr. Phillips has authored several books, many policy reports, and over 100 articles in leading publications.

Cresa Pugh

Cresa Pugh

Cresa Pugh is a doctoral student in Sociology & Social Policy at Harvard University. Her research interests include the social legacies of colonization, ethnic and religious conflict in Southeast Asia, and the role of collective memory and identity in shaping peacebuilding efforts in post-conflict societies. Pugh is currently working on a project that examines the effects of British imperial capitalism on the formation of ethnoreligious tensions in colonial Burma. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology and Religion from Bates College and a Masters of Science in Migration Studies from the University of Oxford.


Matthew Reynolds

Matthew Reynolds

Matthew Reynolds is the Regional Representative of the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) to the United States and the Caribbean. Mr. Reynolds’ distinguished career includes more than 30 years in government service, humanitarian response, oversight and management. Prior to joining UNHCR in 2017, he served as the North America Representative for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA). A graduate of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, Matt spent 17 years in numerous senior positions in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and was instrumental in drafting and enacting foreign assistance and trade legislation. He subsequently served at the U.S. State Department as Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs.

Mahir Zeynalov

Mahir Zeynalov

Mahir Zeynalov is a Washington D.C.-based journalist, analyst, and press freedom champion. He is currently CEO of The Globe Post Media, a digital U.S. media organization that serves as an umbrella group for niche-centric news outlets and prioritizes reporting about rights violations, civil liberties, press freedom and minority rights. He is a columnist for Al Arabiya, and contributor to the Huffington Post. Best known for his work on authoritarian regimes, Zeynalov rose to international prominence for documenting the massive crackdown on journalists in Turkey. He is a frequent commentator in major radio and TV channels, including CNN, BBC, Al Jazeera, NBC and CBC, and was twice recognized among 100 people to follow on foreign policy by the magazine Foreign Policy.