Course List

 

Please consult with Professor Franziska Seraphim for your course of study.

 

Current Course Offerings


Intro: Asia as a world Region


Asia in the World I

HIST 1005 : Asia in the World I

Prof. Zhang
M W 2:00-2:55
Devlin 008

This Core course surveys the Asian origins of the modern world, from the rise of the Eurasian empire under the Mongols in the thirteenth century to the global colonial context of the Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century. We will challenge common geographical (mis) conceptions (e.g., "East" versus "West") in historical narratives/uncover their origins and how they have changed. While emphasizing the global conjunctions in history, this approach highlights Asian experiences of the historical forces that integrated yet also divided the world in changing ways: trade routes, migrations, religions, empires, wars, ideologies, and the constraints of a shared ecological environment. Satisfies Core requirement for History I

THEO 1161.03 Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives

THEO 1161.03 : Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives

Prof. Makransky
T Th 10:30-11:45
Stokes 115S

This is the first semester of a two-semester course on comparative theology that explores Buddhism and Christianity. We focus first in both traditions on basic principles, practices, historical-cultural developments, and sacred stories. In the latter part of the semester, we read modern Buddhist and Christian writing on social ethics and action. We explore how Buddhist and Christian understandings and practices may illumine each other, and how each tradition may shine new light on our own assumptions, spiritualities, and ways of living. Satisfies Core requirement for Theology I

THEO 1161.04 Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives

THEO 1161.04 : Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives

Prof. Mozina
T Th 9:00-10:15
Stokes 113S

This is the first semester of a two-semester course on comparative theology that explores Buddhism and Christianity. We focus first in both traditions on basic principles, practices, historical-cultural developments, and sacred stories. In the latter part of the semester, we read modern Buddhist and Christian writing on social ethics and action. We explore how Buddhist and Christian understandings and practices may illumine each other, and how each tradition may shine new light on our own assumptions, spiritualities, and ways of living. Satisfies Core requirement for Theology I

POLI 2469 Politics of Japan and Korea

POLI 2469 : Politics of Japan and Korea

Prof Hayao
M W F 11:00-11:50
Stokes 461S

This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

This course provides an overview to the politics of contemporary Japan and the Republic of Korea (South Korea). While most of the focus will mostly be on domestic politics, it will include some discussion of their respective foreign policies. The course begins with a brief historical account, and it then proceeds to discussions of culture and society, electoral politics, decision-making structures and processes, and public policy issues.

PHIL 4430 Classical & Contemporary Asian Philosophy

PHIL 4430 : Classical & Contemporary Asian Philosophy

Prof. Johnson
M W F 9:00-9:50
Stokes 101 N

This course will begin with a survey of some of the central texts in the classical Confucian and Buddhist canons. We will then look at the ways in which modern thinkers in Japan (especially figures associated with the Kyoto School such as Nishida Kitaro, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Yuasa Yasuo) and the United States (especially New Confucians such as Tu Wei-Ming and Robert Neville) have appropriated and transformed this intellectual heritage by articulating classical metaphysical and ontological positions in novel ways and by developing creative responses to questions about the nature of the self and of ethical life.

THEO 5387 Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia

THEO 5387 : Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia

Prof. Mozina
T Th 3:00-4:15
Stokes 201N

The bodhisattva--a wise and compassionate being dedicated to the salvation of all sentient beings--is arguably the model for and model of Buddhist practice in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and, more recently, North America and Europe. This course will explore the cultic dimensions of Buddhism in East Asia--the modes of self-cultivation and worship that have revolved around the figure of the bodhisattva. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what Mahayana Buddhism has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories "theology" and "religion." Satisfies Core requirement for Cultural Diversity.

 

Arts and Literature


ARTH 2245 Japanese Visual Culture

ARTH 2245 : Japanese Visual Culture

Prof. Campbell
T Th 10:30-11:45
Devlin 018

This course surveys the visual and material cultures of Japan from Neolithic to present times. Our subject matters include ancient pottery, Buddhist temples, tea culture, Edo woodblock prints, and contemporary art. Particular attention will be paid to understanding objects within their original social and cultural contexts. Students will be trained in various art historical methodologies and will deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Japanese art history through an in-depth research project. Satisfies Core requirement for Cultural Diversity.

ARTH 4315 The Material Culture of Private Life in China

ARTH 4315 : The Material Culture of Private Life in China

Prof. Campbell
Th 3:00-5:30
Devlin 218

This research seminar employs close readings of primary objects, images, and texts as windows into the lives and minds of people living in Ming-Qing China (c. 1400-1900). We will focus on the Chinese house, as well as its gardens and furnishings, seeking to uncover the complex meanings embedded within them. Themes to be explored include the family, gender, love, death, cultural consumption, artistic practice, and aesthetic theory. Throughout the semester we will take trips to local museums, including to Yin Yu Tang, a two-hundred-year-old Chinese house at the Peabody Essex Museum. Satisfies Core requirement for Cultural Diversity

EALC 2161 Ghosts & Strange Happenings in Chinese Literature

EALC 2161 : Ghosts & Strange Happenings in Chinese Literature

Prof. Chiang
T Th 12:00-1:15
Lyons 207

Introduction to the East Asian classic Extensive Records for the Era of Great Peace, an encyclopedic collection of classical Chinese "records of anomalies" (zhiguai) about ghosts, immortals, monsters, fantastic lands, and other such "strange-but-true" happenings. Compiled by the court in the 10th century, the collection soon became an influential source of creative inspiration for East Asian writers. Students will learn about the diverse literary, philosophical, and religious traditions that helped shape these fascinating narratives. Special attention will be paid to the historical conditions that the stories reflect, including moral values, gender roles, and sociopolitical issues. No prerequisite. Taught in English. Satisfies Core requirement for Cultural Diversity

 

Contemporary Asia / History


INTL/HIST/ECON 2871 Industrialization and Democratization in Korea

INTL/HIST/ECON 2871 : Industrialization and Democratization in Korea

Prof. Hwang
T Th 12:00-1:15
Merkert C. 129

This introductory course surveys the political and economic transformation of South Korea from decolonization through the high growth era to today's global neoliberal age. It traces how a war-ravaged country became a prosperous and industrialized nation. In exploring this transformation, it also examines the relationship between Korea's industrialization and its democratization: How did US Cold War modernization impact the Korean state's economic strategy and its political development? Why and how did Korean society campaign for social and political justice during the economic high growth era? The course also considers the reconfiguration of South Korea's political economy since the 1990s.

INTL/HIST 4804 Divided Korea

INTL/HIST 4804 : Divided Korea

Prof. Hwang
T Th 9:00-10:15
Stokes 201S

The Korean Peninsula has remained one of the most internationally contested areas since its division in 1945. This course explores the local and international political conditions that led to the ideological split between the communist North and the capitalist South and its subsequent consolidation into two fiercely opposed regimes over the course of the Cold War and post-Cold eras. Using a combined chronological and thematic approach, this course will address the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of this division on Koreans and on the world.

POLI 2469 Politics of Japan and Korea

POLI 2469 : Politics of Japan and Korea

Prof. Hayao
M W F 11:00-11:50
Stokes 461S

This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

This course provides an overview to the politics of contemporary Japan and the Republic of Korea (South Korea). While most of the focus will mostly be on domestic politics, it will include some discussion of their respective foreign policies. The course begins with a brief historical account, and it then proceeds to discussions of culture and society, electoral politics, decision-making structures and processes, and public policy issues.

 

Religion and Philosophy


THEO/PHIL 4472 Buddhist Ethics

THEO/PHIL 4472 : Buddhist Ethics

Prof. Makransky
T 3:00-5:25
Stokes 403N

We first study classical Buddhist ethical principles and practices in ancient India, Southeast Asia and Tibet. We then discuss some leading contemporary Buddhist writings on ethical analyses of issues in social justice, ecology, global economics, war and peace. Daily mindfulness practice, based on class instruction, is required. Requirements: Weekly writing of 3 pages, active class participation, and final paper.

PHIL 4476 Classical Chinese Philosophy

PHIL 4476 Classical Chinese Philosophy

Fr. Jiang
T Th 10:30-11:45
Stokes 209S

This course is an introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy and designed to introduce students to the major philosophical schools of classical China, including the Confucian, Mohist, Daoist, and Buddhist schools. Through lectures, discussions, and reading of select primary and secondary sources, we will explore the formulations and subsequent transformations of key beliefs, doctrines, practices, and institutions that characterized specific cultural, educational, spiritual and philosophical traditions. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

THEO 5387 Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia

THEO 5387 : Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia

Prof. Mozina
T Th 3:00-4:15
Stokes 201N

The bodhisattva--a wise and compassionate being dedicated to the salvation of all sentient beings--is arguably the model for and model of Buddhist practice in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and, more recently, North America and Europe. This course will explore the cultic dimensions of Buddhism in East Asia--the modes of self-cultivation and worship that have revolved around the figure of the bodhisattva. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what Mahayana Buddhism has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories "theology" and "religion." Satisfies Core requirement for Cultural Diversity.

 

Senior Capstone Class

Designated course this semester


INTL/HIST 4804 Divided Korea

INTL/HIST 4804 : Divided Korea

Prof. Hwang
T Th 9:00-10:15
Stokes 201S

The Korean Peninsula has remained one of the most internationally contested areas since its division in 1945. This course explores the local and international political conditions that led to the ideological split between the communist North and the capitalist South and its subsequent consolidation into two fiercely opposed regimes over the course of the Cold War and post-Cold eras. Using a combined chronological and thematic approach, this course will address the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of this division on Koreans and on the world.

Intro: Asia as a world Region


The Arts of Buddhism

ARTH 2274 : The Arts of Buddhism

Prof. Campbell
T Th 1:30-2:45
Devlin 018

In the early centuries AD, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India across Central Asia to China, Korea, and Japan. As is spread, it profoundly impacted the visual cultures of these regions. Students in this course will be introduced to the major styles and types of Buddhist art and architecture, as well as to the fundamental role it played in religious practice. Topics to be explored include the origins of the anthropomorphic Buddha image, pictorial narratives of the Buddha’s life, the sacred architecture of mandalas, and visual representations of hells and paradises. Students will also deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Buddhist art or architecture through an in-depth research project on a well-conceived topic. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

Buddhist Thought and Practice

THEO 3548/PHIL 4448 : Buddhist Thought and Practice

Prof. Makransky
T 2-4:25
Stokes 101N

We explore aspects of early, Southeast Asian, and East Asian traditions of Buddhism, focusing on ways that Buddhist philosophy informs and is informed by practices of meditation, phenomenological investigation, ritual and ethics. Students will be instructed in mindfulness exercises (cultivating fuller awareness of things) to inform our studies. Weekly writing, active discussion, two short papers, one longer paper.

HIST 4040 Modern East Asian History

HIST 4040 : Modern East Asian History

Prof. Pieragastini
T Th 9-10:15
Devlin 112

This course will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural history of East Asia (including Southeast Asia) from the end of World War II through the Cold War, ending with a look at recent developments in the region. In addition to the conventional interpretation of the Cold War as a bipolar ideological conflict, we will explore several alternative frameworks for understanding the period in the East Asian context. Major topics to be examined include the legacy of imperialism, nation-building, political ideologies and civil conflict, technological transformation, changing work and family life, urbanization, economic development, and environmental pollution.

 

Arts and Literature


ARTH 2241 Chinese Art and Architecture, 1911 to present

ARTH 2241 : Chinese Art and Architecture, 1911 to present

Prof. Campbell
T Th 10:30-11:45
Devlin 018

After the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 Chinese artists were confronted with the great challenge of expressing radically new concepts of modernity, national identity, and selfhood in visual terms. By the mid twentieth century their attention had shifted to the problem of how best to represent the ideologies of the Communist party. Today, contemporary artists and architects respond to new social issues, such as political censorship, environmental destruction, and urban displacement. By covering a wide range of topics--including advertisements of the modern Shanghai woman, Socialist realist sculpture, Mao-era propaganda posters, and the politically-charged works of Ai Weiwei--this course introduces students to this extremely dynamic period in Chinese art history. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

ARTH 2280 Masterpieces of Islamic Art

ARTH 2280 : Masterpieces of Islamic Art

Prof. Blair
T Th 12-1:15
Devlin 218

A detailed examination of a dozen masterpieces of Islamic art ranging from architecture to ceramics, the seventh century to the present, and Spain to India. Emphasis on placing the works in their historical, social, craft, and visual contexts. Satisfies Core requirement for: Arts, Cultural Diversity

ARTH 2274 The Arts of Buddhism

ARTH 2274 : The Arts of Buddhism

Prof. Campbell
T Th 1:30-2:45
Devlin 018

In the early centuries AD, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India across Central Asia to China, Korea, and Japan. As is spread, it profoundly impacted the visual cultures of these regions. Students in this course will be introduced to the major styles and types of Buddhist art and architecture, as well as to the fundamental role it played in religious practice. Topics to be explored include the origins of the anthropomorphic Buddha image, pictorial narratives of the Buddha’s life, the sacred architecture of mandalas, and visual representations of hells and paradises. Students will also deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Buddhist art or architecture through an in-depth research project on a well-conceived topic. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

ARTH 3350 Object in Islamic Art

ARTH 3350 : Object in Islamic Art

Prof. Blair
Th 3-5:30
Devlin 218

Unlike other traditions, much Islamic art comprises everyday objects—dishes, bowls, jugs, bottles, etc.—that are transformed into works of art by their forms and decoration. This seminar focuses on the manufacture, function, collecting and exhibition of these objects. The class will meet several times at the Museum of Fine Arts, and students will be expected to present a paper on an object in their collection. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

ARTH 4402 Art and Architecture of the Forbidden City

ARTH 4402 : Art and Architecture of the Forbidden City

Prof. Campbell
W 3-5:30
Devlin 218

The Forbidden City palace in Beijing constituted the center of Chinese imperial power from the year 1420, when it was constructed, until the early twentieth century. Now home to the Palace Museum, the Forbidden City attracts millions of tourists annually. In addition to examining the Forbidden City’s magnificent halls, temples, gardens, and art objects, produced exclusively for the members of the Ming and Qing imperial courts, students in this course will discuss the shifting roles of the Forbidden City--as a monument, a symbolic form, a social space, a political entity, and a center of cultural production--over a period of approximately six centuries, including the Mao and post-Mao eras. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

EALC 2162 Gods and Heroes in Chinese Literature

EALC 2162 : Gods and Heroes in Chinese Literature

Prof. Chiang
T Th 12-1:15
Lyons 202

An examination, through illustrative readings in East Asian masterworks and through an accompanying analysis, of heroic and divine dimensions in the literary traditions of the major East Asian cultures and how the Far East understands the Divine and the Human, as well as how these interact on the battlefield, in the rise and fall of governments, and in the tensions between individual and society. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

LING 3377 Linguistic Analysis and Field Methods

LING 3377 : Linguistic Analysis and Field Methods

Prof. Thomas
T Th 10:30-11:45
Lyons 207

Course restricted to upper-level Linguists majors/minors and graduate students.

Analysis of a little-studied language (this semester: BAHASA INDONESIA) through direct interaction with a native speaker: techniques for eliciting, transcribing, and interpreting linguistic data, some going back to the beginnings of Western language science, others employing modern technology. Individually and in small groups, students analyze the sound patterns, words, syntax, and pragmatics of the target language, with some attention to cultural and ethnographic matters. The course also addresses ethical issues involved in archiving linguistic materials, and the debate about language rights.

MUSA 2304 Musics of India

MUSA 2304 : Musics of India

Prof. Dineen
T Th 10:30-11:45
Stokes 195 S

This course will introduce students to the rich and varied musical arts of India. Students will delve into the ubiquitous songs of Bollywood and Tamil film, karak and hindustan art musics, temple musics, as well as the music (and dance) of bharatanatyam, bhangra, and other regional genres. Lectures will focus on situating Indian musics in their cultural and historic contexts while exploring issues of identity formation, regional and transnational movements, and the changing meanings of music and the arts in India. Students will also study performance practices--including basic exercises for South Indian melody, rhythm, and dance--which will provide engaged (and embodied) learning supplements to the lectures. There are no academic or music-skills prerequisites for this course.

 

Contemporary Asia


HIST 2476 Cold War in the Third World

HIST 2476 : Cold War in the Third World

Prof. Jacobs
MWF 12-12:50
Campion 302

The half-century conflict between the United States of America and the Soviet Union began in the mid- to late 1940s when the two superpowers established spheres of influence in Europe. Thereafter, unable to make much headway on the Continent, Washington and Moscow jockeyed for influence in the so-called "third world" of developing, decolonizing, and predominantly non-white areas in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. This course examines America's campaign to win the third world to its side, and the often tragic consequences of that effort, as U.S. policymakers frequently wound up simplifying local and regional developments, equating nationalism with communism, aligning America with unstable and unrepresentative regimes, and wedding American interests to the status quo in places experiencing massive social, political, and economic upheaval.

HIST 4003 Public Culture in Postwar Japan

HIST 4003 : Public Culture in Postwar Japan

Prof. Seraphim
T Th 10:30-11:45
Devlin 112

This course is built around six topics through which we explore some of the social conflicts, cultural debates, and creative expressions that have shaped Japan’s public culture since 1945. These include the public culture of war memory, military base conflicts in Okinawa, responses to environmental disasters, the many voices of feminism, youth at the center of Japan’s “lost decades,” anime as Japan’s greatest media success, and urban renewal projects for the Tokyo Olympics, 1964 and 2020. The focus is on recent historical and anthropological work as well as literature and film.  Students will have a chance to do some research into an area of their particular interest. Some background in twentieth century Japanese history is recommended. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

INT/HIST 4022 Human Rights & Democratic Transition in Korea (Prof. Hwang)

INT/HIST 4022 : Human Rights & Democratic Transition in Korea

Prof. Hwang
T Th 9-10:15
Fulton 425

This course introduces students to the historical evolution of human rights talk, activism, norms and politics during the democratic transition in Korea. Who appropriated the language of human rights? Why did they do so? How did local causes and issues become global human rights issues or vice versa? How did human rights language, ideas, norms, and practices affect domestic and international politics on socio-economic, political, and cultural issues in Korea? Along with these questions, this course will examine multilateral and contentious interactions between global and local state and non-state actors. In paying attention to the role of human rights, the course discusses a series of crucially interrelated topics on self-determination, economic development, political liberalization, humanitarianism, and global justice during the Cold War and post-Cold War period.

INTL/HIST 4804 Divided Korea (Prof. Hwang)

INTL/HIST 4804 : Divided Korea

Prof. Hwang
T Th 1:30-2:45
Stokes 201N

The Korean Peninsula has remained one of the most internationally contested areas since its division in 1945. This course explores the local and international political conditions that led to the ideological split between the communist North and the capitalist South and its subsequent consolidation into two fiercely opposed regimes over the course of the Cold War and post-Cold eras. Using a combined chronological and thematic approach, this course will address the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of this division on Koreans and on the world.

 

History


HIST 2045 The Material and Cultural History of Food in China (Prof. Zhang)

HIST 2045 : The Material and Cultural History of Food in China

Prof. Zhang
T Th 4:30-5:45
Stokes 103N

This course studies historical continuity and changes of dietary traditions and culinary practices in China. We will examine how certain foods gave possibilities to and conditioned China's cultural formation and, in return, how food and ways of eating are culturally, socially, and politically constructed. The course's themes include food and religion in early China, food and Chinese medicine in the early medieval, food exchanges with central Asia, food and urbanization during the "Medieval Economic Revolution," the New World food in late imperial China, regional culinary and cultural diversities, and eating in globalized, modern China.

HIST 2652 History of Shanghai (Prof. Pieragastini)

HIST 2652 : History of Shanghai

Prof. Pieragastini
T Th 12-1:15
Devlin 221

Shanghai: "the Paris of the East," "the Pearl of the Orient. "the City of the Future!" Why is it that this city evokes such hyperbolic statements? How, despite dramatic social, political, and economic upheavals, is Shanghai's unique history guiding its present and future path? On course to be the world's largest city in the near future, Shanghai is a city with an identity crisis. This course will explore various facets of the city’s history, including urban culture, the representation of gender and sexuality, the complex adaptation of global influences, the role of class and ethnicity, and economic development.

HIST 4040 Modern East Asian History

HIST 4040 : Modern East Asian History

Prof. Pieragastini
T Th 9-10:15
Devlin 112

This course will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural history of East Asia (including Southeast Asia) from the end of World War II through the Cold War, ending with a look at recent developments in the region. In addition to the conventional interpretation of the Cold War as a bipolar ideological conflict, we will explore several alternative frameworks for understanding the period in the East Asian context. Major topics to be examined include the legacy of imperialism, nation-building, political ideologies and civil conflict, technological transformation, changing work and family life, urbanization, economic development, and environmental pollution.

 

Religion and Philosophy


THEO 3527 Meditation and Action: Interfaith Explorations (Prof. Makransky)

THEO 3527 : Meditation and Action: Interfaith Explorations

Prof. Makransky
Th 2-4:25
Stokes 213S

Tibetan Buddhist understandings of the nature of awareness with its capacities for wisdom and compassionate responsiveness are explored through contemporary writing and guided meditations adapted for students of all faiths and backgrounds. Buddhist thought and practice is then brought into conversation with Thomas Merton, Martin Luther King, Gandhi, Dorothy Day, Henri Nouwen and other faith-based activists for learning across religious boundaries (comparative theology) and to shed light on the students’ own spiritualities as bases for social service and action. Weekly writing, active weekly discussion, two ten page papers.

THEO 3548/PHIL 4448 Buddhist Thought and Practice (Prof. Makransky)

THEO 3548/PHIL 4448 : Buddhist Thought and Practice

Prof. Makransky
T 2-4:25
Stokes 101N

We explore aspects of early, Southeast Asian, and East Asian traditions of Buddhism, focusing on ways that Buddhist philosophy informs and is informed by practices of meditation, phenomenological investigation, ritual and ethics. Students will be instructed in mindfulness exercises (cultivating fuller awareness of things) to inform our studies. Weekly writing, active discussion, two short papers, one longer paper.

THEO/PHIL 5387 Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia (Prof. Mozina)

THEO/PHIL 5387 : Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia

Prof. Mozina
T Th 12-1:15
Stokes 217N

The bodhisattva--a wise and compassionate being dedicated to the salvation of all sentient beings--is the model for and model of Buddhist practice in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and, more recently, North America and Europe. This course will explore the cultic dimensions of Buddhism in East Asia--the modes of self-cultivation and worship that have revolved around the figure of the bodhisattva. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what Mahayana Buddhism has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories "theology" and "religion." Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

 

Senior Capstone Class

Designated course this semester


HIST 4003 Public Culture in Postwar Japan

HIST 4003 : Public Culture in Postwar Japan

Prof. Seraphim
T Th 10:30-11:45
Devlin 112

This course is built around six topics through which we explore some of the social conflicts, cultural debates, and creative expressions that have shaped Japan’s public culture since 1945. These include the public culture of war memory, military base conflicts in Okinawa, responses to environmental disasters, the many voices of feminism, youth at the center of Japan’s “lost decades,” anime as Japan’s greatest media success, and urban renewal projects for the Tokyo Olympics, 1964 and 2020. The focus is on recent historical and anthropological work as well as literature and film.  Students will have a chance to do some research into an area of their particular interest. Some background in twentieth century Japanese history is recommended. Satisfies Core requirement for: Cultural Diversity

ARTH221301 Islamic Architecture

TTh 12:00-1:15pm

Sheila Blair, Fine Arts

 

ARTH224601 Architecture in East Asia

TTh 10:30-11:45am

Aurelia Campbell, Fine Arts

 

ARTH421401 Art of the Silk Road

Th 3:00-5:30pm 

Sheila Blair (Co-taught with Prof. Aurelia Campbell), Fine Arts

 

EALC1121+1123 Elementary Chinese I + Practicum                                           

Fang Lu (EALC1121 Lecture, TTh 9:00-10:15am)

Richardson, Violet J (EALC112301 MWF 9:00- 9:50am; EALC112302 MWF 11:00-11:50am)

Huimin Li (EALC112303 MWF 9:00-9:50am; EALC112304 MWF 12:00-12:50pm)

Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC122101 Elementary Japanese I

Ritsuko Sullivan (EALC122101 MWF 12:00-12:50pm, W 11:00-11:50am)

Asako Miyaki Ashley (EALC122102 MWF 1:00-1:50pm, F 11:00-11:50am)

Slavic and Eastern Languages & Literatures

 

EALC131101 Introduction to Korean I

TTh 1:30-2:45pm

Slavic and Eastern Languages & Literatures

 

EALC2121+2123 Intermediate Chinese I + Practicum

Sing-chen Chiang (EALC212101 Lecture, TTh 9:00-10:15am)

Xiaoqing Yu (EALC212301 MWF 8:00-8:50am; EALC212303 MWF 9:00-9:50am)

Te Lai (EALC212302 MWF 9:00-9:50am)

Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC222101 Intermediate Japanese I

MWF 3:00-3:50pm, M 4:00-4:50pm

Jun Cheung, Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC231101 Continuing Korean I

TTh 12:00-1:15pm

Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC322101 Third Year Japanese I

MWF 2:00-2:50pm, F 11:00-11:50am

Jun Cheung, Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC326301 Japanese Pop Culture

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Ritsuko Sullivan, Slavic and Eastern Languages & Literatures

  

EALC412101+412102 Advanced Chinese I  

TTh 10:30-11:45am &12:00-1:15pm [two sections]

Fang Lu, Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC4151 Readings in Chinese Literature and Philosophy

TTh 12:00-1:15pm

Sing-chen Chiang, Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

EALC422101 Advanced Japanese I

MWF 2:00-2:50pm

Asako Miyaki Ashley, Slavic & Eastern Languages and Literatures 

 

ENGL3383 Asian American Film

MWF 1:00-1:50pm; T 7:00-9:00pm -- film screening

Christina Klein, English

 

HIST202001 Japanese Cultural Icons through Modern Times

TTh 12-1:15pm

Franziska Seraphim, History

 

HIST204101 China from Antiquity to the Middle Ages

TTh 1:30-2:45pm

Ling Zhang, History

 

HIST409001 Modern South Asia

TTh 9:00-10:15am

Prasannan Parthasarathi, History

 

PHIL446801 Asian Philosophy

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

David Johnson, Philosophy

 

PHIL447701 Classical Chinese Philosophy

TTh 1:30-2:45pm

Fr. Youguo Jiang, Philosophy

 

POLI246901 Politics of Japan and Korea

MWF11:00-11:50am

Kenji Hayao, Political Science

 

POLI459001 East Asian Security

MW 3:00-4:15pm

Robert Ross, Political Science

 

THEO3507, PHIL3503, TMCE7124 Buddhist Philosophy and Psychology

T 2:00-4:20pm

John Makransky, Philosophy and Theology

 

THEO657801, PHIL657801 Daoism

TTh 3:00-4:15pm

David Mozina, Theology