Events and Exhibitions

Events


Opening Reception: 1968:NOW!

Opening Reception: 1968:NOW!

Wednesday, December 5, 2018; 6:00–7:00 p.m.

The philosophy, art, and history course titled “1968: Now” invites you to a gallery of final student art work. This exhibition explores the nature of rebellion, art, and subversive culture born in the 1960’s. “1968: Now!” will be a poignant look at independence, culture, and youth itself in 2018. How have things remained the same? And in what ways have we changed forever? The class's students and instructors will be at this reception, and available to answer these and other questions you may have. And, there will be snacks! Sponsored by the Boston College Arts Council and the Art, Art History, and Film department. All are welcome.


Art Show & Reception: Happy Now?

Art Show & Reception: Happy Now?

Friday, December 7, 2018; 5:00–7:00 p.m.
Murray Carriage House, Boston College

Come celebrate the end of the semester and see what the Senior Studio Art Majors have been up to across Beacon Street! All are welcome for an evening of art and camaraderie (and, we suspect, snacks and beverages).

 

Exhibitions


“1968:NOW!” A Unique Gallery Exhibition

“1968:NOW!” A Unique Gallery Exhibition

The philosophy, art, and history course titled “1968: Now” invites you to a gallery of final student art work. This exhibition explores the nature of rebellion, art, and subversive culture born in the 1960’s. “1968: Now!” will be a poignant look at independence, culture, and youth itself in 2018. How have things remained the same? And in what ways have we changed forever?


Carrie Mae Weems: Strategies of Engagement

Closing soon: Carrie Mae Weems: Strategies of Engagement

McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College
September 10–December 13, 2018

The Art Department's Professor Ash Anderson co-curated with Boston College English Professor Robin Lydenberg this exhibition featuring projects created by photographer and videographer Carrie Mae Weems during the last thirty years. Throughout her career, the artist has used various media to examine history -- specifically, African American history -- critically. The works included in "Strategies of Engagement" were selected for their immersive and participatory nature in order to challenge the viewer to join Weems in her questioning of existing power structures in the realms of race, gender, politics, and identity. The artist will present a lecture, "Don't Let Me Be Lonely," at Boston College on September 10th (see above). At left: Mourning, from the series "Constructing History," 2008 (archival pigment print, 60 x 50"). © Carrie Mae Weems/Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.


Hartmut Austen: Not There, Not Here

Closing soon: Hartmut Austen: Not There, Not Here

McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College
September 10–December 13, 2018

The Art Department's Professor Hartmut Austen describes his paintings as abstract works based on the visible world. He takes as inspiration images that catch his attention, perhaps because of their content or their composition, and transforms these images -- changing colors or shapes, or using composites of multiple images -- into a picture that encapsulates what's important to him at the time that he's creating the work. His intent is to make paintings that are open-ended in meaning, and that create a feeling or memory in the viewer's mind that related to that viewer's experience at a particular moment in time. At left: Untitled, 2016 (acrylic on canvas; 60 x 48").