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Summer Undergraduate Courses

 
Preliminary Undergraduate course offerings for Summer 2016 are listed below. Course syllabi from 2015 are listed for your reference.  2016 syllabi will be posted as they are submitted by the course instructor.

Boston College schedules two six-week sessions in the summer:

Session I: Tuesday, May 17 through Thursday, June 24 -
                NOTE - No Class Monday May 16; makeup class meets on Friday May 20
                No class Monday May 30, Memorial Day.
                No MORNING classes on Monday May 23, Commencement Day; evening classes
                DO meet.

Session II: Monday, June 27 through Friday, August 5
                No class Monday July 4th.

Most courses follow this schedule unless otherwise noted.

 

Please note: This page links to PDF files. Use this link to download Adobe Reader if needed.

ACCT 102101   Financial Accounting
ACCT102101 Syllabus 2016
This course develops an understanding of the basic elements of financial accounting and the role of accounting in society. Students are introduced to financial statements and to the fundamental accounting concepts, procedures, and terminology employed in contemporary financial reporting. The skills necessary to analyze business transactions, to prepare and comprehend financial statements, and to examine a firm's profitability and financial condition are developed. Students are required to use the Internet to conduct a financial statement analysis project.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Diane Feldman

BIOL 130001  Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL130001 Syllabus from 2015
Corequisite:  BIOL 1310
This course lays the foundation for the understanding of human anatomy and physiology. The first portion of the course covers cellular and molecular aspects of eukaryotic cell function: basic chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle control, and genetics. The course continues with the study of several organ systems. Beginning with the Integument, which is followed by the Skeletal and Muscular Systems, and ending this first semester with the Nervous System. The cellular and molecular basis for the functions of these systems is an integral element of this portion of the course.
Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m., Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 131001 or 131002 Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
BIOL131001 Syllabus from 2015

Corequisite:  BIOL 1300
Lab fee required, $205. Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the various structures and principles discussed in BIOL 1300 through the use of anatomical models, physiological experiments, and limited dissection. Lab fee required.
Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 27–July 13, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Carol Chaia Halpern

BIOL 132001  Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL132001 Syllabus from 2015
Corequisite: BIOL 1330
The second portion of this introductory course is a continuation of BIOL 1300/1310, with a primary emphasis on the physiology of the major body systems. Systems studied in this course include the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. While the physiological functions under normal conditions are emphasized, relevant disease or dysfunctional conditions are also discussed. Does not
satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m., Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 133001 or 133002 Anatomy and Physiology Lab II
BIOL133001 Syllabus from 2015
Corequisite:  BIOL 1320
Lab fee required, $205. A continuation of BIOL 1310. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 18–August 3, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Carol Chaia Halpern
 

BIOL 220101  Introductory Biology I
BIOL200001 Syllabus 2016
Corequisite: BIOL 2100
Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling and genetics.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Linda Tanini

BIOL 210001  Introductory Biology Laboratory I
BIOL210001 Syllabus 2016

Corequisite: BIOL 2201
Lab fee required, $200. The first semester of a two-semester introductory biology laboratory course designed for non-biology majors preparing for graduate programs in health professions. This course teaches basic laboratory skills, including microscopy, spectrophotometry, analytical electrophoresis and molecular cloning. Students are introduced to the principles of experimental design, data analysis and data interpretation. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in biochemistry, cell physiology and molecular biology.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m., Linda Tanini

BIOL 220201  Introductory Biology II
BIOL220201 Syllabus 2016
Corequisite: BIOL 2110
Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution, and human ecology.
July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Linda Tanini


BIOL 211001  Introductory Biology Laboratory II
BIOL211001 Syllabus 2016
Corequisite: BIOL 2202
Lab fee required, $200. The continuation of BIOL2100. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in organismic biology, ecology and field biology.
July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m., Linda Tanini

 

BIOL 220001  Microbiology for Health Professionals
Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I and II.
Corequisite: BIOL 2210
BIOL220001 Syllabus from 2015
This course is a study of the basic physiological and biochemical activities of bacteria and viruses. Emphasis will be placed on virulence factors and the mechanism by which a variety of microorganisms and viruses establish an infection. The use of anti-viral drugs and antibiotics, the host immune response to microbial infection, and the effectiveness of various vaccination strategies will also be discussed.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 1:00-4:00 p.m., Andrea Kirmaier

BIOL 221001  Microbiology for Health Professionals Laboratory
BIOL221001 Syllabus from 2015
Lab fee required, $200. Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacterial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 4:00-6:30 p.m., Holli Rowedder

CHEM 110901  General Chemistry I
CHEM110901 Syllabus 2016 and CHEM110901 Schedule 2016
This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships and chemical equilibrium and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
June 20–July 11, M T W TH F, 8:30-11:15 a.m., William Griffin
* NOTE - MONDAY JULY 11 CHEM 1109 ends and CHEM 1112 begins *

CHEM 111101  General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM111101 Lab Syllabus 2016
Lab fee required, $205. Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
June 20–July 7, M T W TH, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., William Griffin

CHEM 111001  General Chemistry II
CHEM111001 Syllabus 2016 and CHEM111001 Schedule 2016
This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships, chemical equilibrium, and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
July 12–August 5, T W F M (no TH), 8:30-11:15 a.m., William Griffin

CHEM 111201  General Chemistry Laboratory II
CHEM111201 Lab Syllabus 2016
Lab fee required, $205. Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
July 12–August 4, M T W (no TH), 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., William Griffin
* NOTE - MONDAY JULY 11 CHEM 1109 ends and CHEM 1112 begins *

 

*NB* Due to laboratory renovation construction, Organic Chem labs will NOT be offered in Summer 2016 

CHEM 223101  Organic Chemistry I (Lecture only)
CHEM223101 Syllabus 2016
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties, reaction mechanisms, and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
June 20–July 12, M T TH F, 9:30-12 noon, Karen Atkinson

CHEM 223201  Organic Chemistry II (Lecture only)
CHEM223201 Syllabus 2016
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties and reaction mechanisms and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
July 14–August 4, M T TH F, 9:30-12 noon, Karen Atkinson
 
(Due to laboratory renovation construction, Organic Chem labs will NOT be offered in Summer 2016)  


CHEM 335101  Analytical Chemistry - 4 Credits
CHEM3351 and CHEM3353 Syllabus 2016
Corequisite: CHEM 3353
Designed primarily for sophomore and junior students, this course is an introduction to the principles and practice of analytical chemistry, including the statistical analysis of data and widely-used chemical methods and instrumental approaches such as chromatography, spectrophotometry, and electrochemistry. In the laboratory, the aims are for students to develop good analytical technique and to acquire accurate, precise data.
July 5–July 29, M T W TH F, 4:00-6:00 p.m., Kenneth Metz

CHEM 335301  Analytical Chemistry Laboratory - 0 credit
CHEM3351 and 3353 Syllabus 2016
Lab fee required, $205. Laboratory required of all students enrolled in CHEM3351.
July 6–July 29, M W F, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., Kenneth Metz


COMM 1030  Public Speaking
COMM103001 Syllabus - 2015
COMM103002 Syllabus - Prof Owens 2016

COMM103003 Syllabus - Prof Lindmark 2016
This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key elements of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speaking and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and expository addresses. This is a performance course.
COMM 103001  Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Rita Rosenthal
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
COMM 103002  Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Andrew Owens

COMM 103003  Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Joyce Lindmark
COMM 103004 Session II,  M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Brett Ingram

COMM 227801  Social Media
COMM227801 Syllabus 2016
This course examines the cultural, economic and political aspects of emerging computer-mediated communication technologies known as “social media,” including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. Students will critically interrogate the impact of social media on relationships, identity, social/political movements, branding/marketing, and everyday practices. The course will also cover practical social media skills with assignments and activities involving hands-on experience using social media technologies to create and distribute content.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Marcus Breen

COMM 230801  Entertainment Media
Focuses on the study of entertainment media from historical, critical and practical perspectives. Topics include film history, broadcast history, video games, the Internet, screenwriting and sports media. Projects include film reviews, short screenplays and analyses of how television networks make business decisions. In addition to lectures and screenings, the class includes a variety of practical exercises and guest speakers from across the entertainment industries.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Matt Sienkiewicz
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

COMM 444901  Crisis Communication
COMM444901 Syllabus 2016
This course is designed to examine events and situations that potentially threaten the viability of an organization. Attention is devoted to developing an effective crisis communication plan, speaking to multiple stakeholders, decision-making under pressure, and resolving–rather than litigating–organizational problems. Among the studies examined are the Tylenol product tampering incident, the Exxon Valdez accident, the Union Carbide gas leak, the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster, the Three Mile Island accident, and the Pepsi syringe hoax.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Donald Fishman 

EESC 114001  Our Mobile Earth
EESC114001 Syllabus 2016
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. In-class meetings - W 5/18 and M 6/13.  All other classes are online. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA and on the Summer website for full details.
This course will provide you with an introduction to the structure of Earth and the dynamic processes that continuously shape and remodel its surface. During class, we will discuss the formation and evolution of the oceans and continents within the framework of the modern theory of plate tectonics. The locations, causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes are presented. The dynamics within Earth which drive the tectonic plates are outlined.
Session I, M W, 9:30am-12:45 p.m., Jennifer Cole
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
In-class meetings - W 5/18 and M 6/13.  All other classes are online.


EESC 116301  Environmental Issues and Resources
EESC116301 Syllabus 2016
Learn about the major processes at work inside and on the surface of the Earth. Acquire skills that will promote logical decision-making about evaluating and purchasing land and property. Each class is designed to examine the facts, historical background, and through homework exercises, in-class exercises and virtual labs, provide experience in analyzing and solving real-world problems associated with environmental issues, resources and sustainability. Demonstrations, videos, readings and a campus field trip underscore important concepts and applications.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Kenneth Galli
 

ECON 1131  Principles of Economics I — Micro
ECON113101 Syllabus 2016
ECON113102 Syllabus 2016
This course is an analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the interaction of households and business firms in a modern Western economy. The appropriate role of government intervention is examined, and basic analytical tools are applied to current economic problems.
ECON113101  Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Deeksha Kale
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
ECON113102  Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Francesca Toscano
 

ECON 1132  Principles of Economics II — Macro
ECON113201 Syllabus - 2016
ECON113202 Syllabus - 2015
This course is an analysis of national income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and international aspects of macroeconomic policy.
ECON 113201  Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Mehmet Ezer
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
ECON 113202  Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jacob Penglase

ECON 1151  Statistics
This course is focused on probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation of parameters, tests of hypotheses, regression, and forecasting.
This course satisfies the Statistics requirement for Boston College Arts & Sciences Economics majors.
ECON115101  Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Anatoly Arlashin
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
ECON115102  Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Anatoly Arlashin


ECON 336101  Monetary Theory and Policy
Prerequisite: Macroeconomic Theory
ECON336101 Syllabus 2015
An analysis of the operation and behavior of financial markets and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial intermediaries, including commercial banks and the central bank. The money supply process and alternative theories of the demand for money are considered, as well as their implications for monetary policy and macroeconomic performance.
Session II, M W, 6:30-9:45 p.m., Hossein Kazemi

ECON 336501  Public Finance
Prerequisite: Microeconomic Theory
ECON336501 Syllabus 2015
This is a course in the microeconomics of the public sector. We will discuss the rationale for the government's role in a market economy, major expenditure programs, and the theory and structure of the tax system. The focus will be on the federal (as opposed to state and local) government's expenditure and tax programs, with special attention given to topics of current concern.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Mark Kazarosian

WRITING

ENGL 1010  First Year Writing Seminar
ENGL101001 Syllabus - 2015
ENGL101002  Syllabus - 2016 - Prof. Ford Burley
Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a course-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets twice a week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.
ENGL 101001  Session I, M W, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Lorenzo Puente
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20; No class Monday May 23, Commencement Day
ENGL 101002  Session II, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Richard Ford Burley
 


LITERATURE

ENGL 1080  Literature Core
ENGL108001 Syllabus - 2016 - Prof. Ford Burley
ENGL108002 Syllabus - 2015
In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide an introduction to literary genres.
ENGL 108001  Session I, M W, 8:15-11:45 a.m., Richard Ford Burley
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20; No class Monday May 23 Commencement Day
ENGL 108002  Session II, T Th, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Robert Farrell, S.J.


ADEN 141301  New World Classics
ADEN141301 Syllabus

Course explores six classics of American fiction and the distinctive American form and style which emerges.
Session I, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m., Robert Farrell, S.J.

FILM 227901  Social Issues in Literature & Film
This course will examine the effective use of the visual image to portray social issues of the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics such as the inequalities of race, gender and religion will be the focus. Written accounts (short stories and newspaper articles) will offer further interpretations of these subjects.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., John Michalczyk and Susan Michalczyk


FILM 228201  Political Fiction Film
Political fiction film has often served as a dramatic means to deliver an ideological message. Its roots go back to Griffith's Civil War epic Birth of a Nation (1915). During World War II with such popular films as Casablanca Hollywood directors offered patriotic messages to an American audience with its recent history of isolationism. More recently, Costa-Gavras' Z (1969) combined thriller elements with a non-conventional political perspective. Through readings, screenings, and discussion of these and other works, we are able to analyze the dual components of drama and politics in a chronological manner.
May 18–June 22, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., John Michalczyk 
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

MFIN 102101  Basic Finance
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or equivalent.
MFIN102101 Syllabus
This is a course designed to survey the areas of corporate financial management, money and capital markets, and financial institutions. Corporate finance topics include the time value of money, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, financial analysis, and working capital management. Financial markets and institutions cover the role of financial intermediaries and instruments as they function in a complex economic system.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Drew Hession-Kunz
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

 

FORS 220101  Wounded Warriors in Transition
FORS2201 Syllabus 2016
Over 65,000 US troops have been wounded since 2001. Many have suffered “the hidden injuries” – traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. The purpose of this course is for students to gain an understanding of military culture, catastrophic injuries, and the journey of Wounded Warriors and their family members. The course examines the history and culture of the Armed Services and the developing knowledge of the rehabilitation of Wounded Warriors.
May 17–June 23, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Sarah Gregorian and Ann Burgess


FORS 531801  Forensic Science I
Corequisite: FORS 531901 Forensics Lab
Forensic science concepts and principles play a critical role in analyzing crime scene evidence. This course draws on scientific principles and examines cases where there has been a death, including suicide, accidental, and criminal; and cases where there is a survivor, in which there is a legal and/or ethical component. Specifically, the course applies a case method format to forensic science issues including forensic pathology, clinical forensics, crime victims, computer crime and equivocal death.
May 17–June 23, T TH, 10:00 a.m.-12:50 p.m.
Michael Piatelli and Ann Burgess


FORS 531901  Forensics Lab
Corequisite: FORS 531801 Forensic Science
Students will learn and use equipment and techniques from the field of forensics to process and evaluate evidence from mock crime scenes. Students will employ various diagnostic tests and methods from the sciences of serology, pathology, ballistics, molecular biology, physics, and biochemistry to solve a contrived criminal case. The laboratory experience will invite students to utilize an array of scientific techniques and to confront and deliberate the ethical and legal implications surrounding the application of forensic science in a court of law.
May 17–June 23, T TH, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
Ann Burgess

 

HIST 102701  Modern History I: Political and Cultural History of Modernism
HIST102701 Syllabus from 2015
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. The Monday class session will be conducted online, and the Wednesday class session will  meet in person. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA and on the Summer Session website for more detailed information.
This is the first of two courses that survey the historical development of Europe from the Renaissance to the present, with the intention of explaining how the unique Western society in which we live today came into being. The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has made the development of Europe a key to understanding the modern world as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on political, diplomatic, and cultural factors, but social, economic and religious aspects are also covered. This course will cover the period from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Martin Menke

HIST 102801  Modern History II
HIST102801 Syllabus - 2015
The continuation of HIST1027.  (This course is not taught in the hybrid format.)
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Maloney

HIST 103901  The West and the World: 1500-1789
HIST103901 Syllabus - 2016
The past five hundred years witnessed the rise to power and prosperity of Western societies. This course examines the significance of the beginning of global relationships. Includes issues in early modern European history, as well as early exploration, the colonization of America, the African slave trade and the Atlantic economic dependency.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Karen Miller

HIST 104001  The West and The World II
HIST104001 Syllabus - 2015
This is the second of two courses that survey the historical development of Europe from the Renaissance to the present, with the intention of explaining how the unique Western society in which we live today came into being. The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has made the development of Europe a key to understanding the modern world as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on political, diplomatic, and cultural factors, but social, economic and religious aspects are also covered. This course will cover the period from the fall of Napoleon to the present.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Maloney

HIST 283001  History of Boston’s Neighborhoods
HIST283001 Syllabus 2016
An historical look at Boston explores parts of its “neighborhoods,” including the old West End, the South End, the North End, South Boston, East Boston, Charlestown, Dorchester, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Hyde Park, and West Roxbury. Walking and bus tours are planned during the regular class meetings.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Chris Hannan

HIST 283101  Modern America: 1945 to the Present
HIST283101 Syllabus 2016

An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women’s movement, the Reagan years and life in the 1980’s, 1990’s to the present.
Session II, M W, 8:30-11:45 a.m., Alex Bloom

HIST 284701  The Americas: A History from 1492-2012
HIST284701 Syllabus  2016
On the eve of the discovery of the Americas, Mexico and South America boasted the most complex and productive economies and governments in all the Americas. Throughout the colonial period, these regions continued to produce the most money and attract the most colonists. However, things changed. Today the United States and Canada possess a success and stability in government and economy largely absent in other American countries. Why and when did this change occur? This course attempts to answer those questions.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Mark Christensen

HIST 284801  U.S. Religious History in the 20th Century
This course will survey U.S Religious History from the Great Depression to the present. It will consider how religion shapes political, cultural, social, and economic life in American over the course of the twentieth century. This course will examine religious devotion, religious institutions, theology, and spiritual life. Special attention will be paid to the role of Catholicism in American history. Topics to be addressed include the religion in politics; the religious revival of the 1950s; religion in the Cold War; religion in the social and racial struggles of the 1960s; and religion in the rise of the right.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Cajka

HIST 284901  U.S. History, 1900-1945
This course surveys American history from the opening of the twentieth century to the end of World War II. It will consider political, cultural, social, religious and economic developments. Special attention will be paid to the rise of the United States as a global power. Topics to be addressed include Industrialization, Immigration, Urbanization, Progressivism, Prohibition, and the Great Depression.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Cajka
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

ADIT 130001 Coding Boot Camp
ADIT130001 Link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc - 2015

During this two-week summer coding boot camp students are taught the fundamentals of coding using HTML, the markup language that every Web site and many mobile phone apps are built with, and the industry-standard JavaScript programming language. Designed specifically for individuals who have never programmed before (or have very little prior experience), this camp teaches participants how to create their own Web sites from scratch and how to bring them to life with JavaScript.
July 11–July 22, M T W TH F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Aaron Walsh and Barbara Mikolacczak

ADIT 134101  Social Media: To The Web and Beyond
ONLINE course.
ADIT134101 link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc - 2015
This course addresses current and forthcoming Social Media technologies, Web sites, software programs and mobile apps (iPhone and Android apps) with a special focus on privacy and security. Rich and interactive forms of communication, collaboration, and socialization are the heart of Social Media, but come at a price: privacy breaches, identity theft, cyber-stalkers and "online addictions" are among the many issues that we must grapple with. In this unique course students learn how to harness the power of Social Media while protecting themselves and guarding their privacy. Technologies covered in this course include Social Networking (Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Tinder, Snapchat, etc.); video and photo sharing (YouTube, Vimeo, Twitch, Instagram, Imgur, etc.); video games and virtual worlds (Minecraft, World of Warcraft, League of Legends, Second Life, etc.), as well as a forthcoming generation of Social Media technologies.
No auditors.
May 17–June 23, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m. ONLINE
Barbara Mikolajczak and Aaron Walsh

ADIT 137501  Future Tech and Emerging Media
ONLINE course
ADIT137501 Link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc - 2015
With an emphasis on critical thinking and analysis, this survey course prepares students for a future shaped by high technology and digital media. Students in this course work in teams to compose and present comprehensive reports on emerging technologies that will directly impact their personal and professional lives. Through group discussions and open debates students will closely examine and consider the ethical issues that these technologies raise.
June 28–Aug 4, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m. ONLINE
Barbara Mikolajczak and Aaron Walsh

 

ADJO 223001   News Writing
ADJO223001 Syllabus (2015)
Since the art of communication prospers only when we fully realize the power of words, this course is designed to expand your powers of expression, both written and verbal. We will explore what some great communicators (Lincoln, Churchill, William Faulkner, Martin Luther King, Joan Didion, John Updike, others) have to teach us about precise expression. We will also glean lessons from such contemporary sources as journalism (the daily newspaper), narrative nonfiction (magazines and books), arts criticism (movies, music, theater), the advertising industry, and the blogosphere. A further goal of the course is to help students develop a large and vital vocabulary, and an understanding of usage, that will enable them to write and speak with precision.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Don Aucoin

ADJO 334901  Politics and the Media: Power and Influence
ADJO334901 Syllabus 2016
An analysis of mass media’s impact on the workings of the American system. The media’s interaction and influence on political institutions, on the presidential selection process, on national and international events, on office holders, politicians, heads of state and the treatment of economic upheaval and violence are analyzed. Considers the media’s role in the coverage of war, especially in a terrorist world.
Session I, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m., Marie Natoli
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

RLRL 102001  The Drama of Immigration in Contemporary Spanish and Latin American Literature and Film 
The experiences of the displaced, the exile and the immigrant have inspired great literature and cinema in the Spanish speaking world.  This course will delve into a variety of narratives about the perilous journeys of Central Americans and Mexicans making their way to the North, the terrifying voyages of the brave and desperate people crossing to Spain from North Africa, and the struggle to adapt to new social, cultural and linguistic realities.  Students will read, in English translation, short stories, short novellas, and first-hand accounts of immigrant experiences and watch several Spanish-language movies with English subtitles.  All class discussions and assignments will be in English.   
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Christopher Wood

RLRL 116301  Boston’s French Connection
(All in English)
RLRL116301 Syllabus
Students will explore the following topics: early French explorers and the Acadian experience, Boston’s Puritans and French Huguenots, the American and French Revolutions, French influences on Boston’s Catholics and Unitarian Transcendentalists, French influences on Boston’s musicians, painters, sculptors, architects, politicians and writers, and contributions of the different Francophone peoples in Boston. Students will develop skill in analyzing historical and literary texts and will examine closely passages in Alexis de Tocqueville’s "Democracy in America" and Simone de Beauvoir’s "America Day by Day".
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., James Flagg

 

SPANISH

SPAN 101501  Elementary Spanish I
SPAN 101501 and 101601 Syllabus - 2015
This introductory course is designed for students with no prior Spanish experience as well as those who have had some high school Spanish. Elementary Spanish I provides a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of student activities. Students will interact in Spanish with the instructor and with classmates. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of basic communicative tasks.
June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Silvana Falconi
 

SPAN 101601 Elementary Spanish II
SPAN 101501 and 101601 Syllabus - 2015
Elementary Spanish II is the second course in the Elementary Spanish I and II sequence. It continues to provide a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when student activities involve critical thinking about real-world information. Students will interact in Spanish with the instructor and with classmates. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of communicative and writing tasks in different time frames.
July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Silvana Falconi
 

SPAN 1115  Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN111501 Syllabus Prof Carrion Guerrero 2016
SPAN111502 Syllabus Prof Cuneo 2016
Intermediate Spanish I is the first course in the second-year sequence. It continues to develop and strengthen students’ proficiency in the Spanish language as well as to increase their cultural understanding. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking. Throughout the course, students will develop fluency and accuracy, and focus on communication. They will expand the vocabulary and enhance their understanding of essential Spanish grammar concepts. Short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials will provide opportunities to learn to appreciate of cultural differences and impart authentic insight into the Hispanic world.
SPAN111501 - June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Elena Carrion Guerrero
SPAN111502 - June 27–July 14, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Pia Cuneo

SPAN 1116  Intermediate Spanish II
SPAN111601 Syllabus Prof Carrion Guerrero 2016
SPAN111602 Syllabus Prof Sargent 2016
Intermediate Spanish II is the second course in the second-year sequence with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking. This course focuses on vocabulary building, the examination of some of the finer grammar points, and moving students towards a more complex level of comprehension and expression. Students will work with short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement will be fulfilled for schools that require a 4th-semester proficiency.
SPAN1116
01 - July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Elena Carrion Guerrero
SPAN111602 - July 18–August 4, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Barbara Sargent

 

MGMT 1021  Organizational Behavior
MGMT102101 Syllabus 2016 - Prof Leduc
As an introduction to the study of human behavior in organizations, this course aims at increasing an awareness and understanding of individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational events, as well as increasing a student's ability to explain and influence such events. The course deals with concepts that are applicable to institutions of any type; a central thrust of these concepts concerns the way institutions can become more adaptive and effective. The course is designed to help the student understand and influence the groups and organizations to which he/she currently belongs and with which he/she will become involved in a later career.
MGMT102101 Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Steven Leduc
MGMT102102 Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Roberta Pellant

MKTG 102101  Marketing Principals
MKTG102101 Syllabus 2016
Marketing is dynamic, changing, creative, challenging and plays a leading role in a firm's strategy and destiny. Intended for those planning a career in Marketing, or will do career activities requiring mareting - doing a business startup, designing new services, online/social media, retail. Marketing owns the customer relationship and defines market-driven strategy. You will learn three skill sets: Target Marketing Skills - segmenting and targeting within markets, Strategic Marketing Skills - position vis-a-vis competitors, and Marketing Management Skills - managing the design of products/services, pricing, message and media, distribution channels, and online search/social media.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jon Kerbs

 

MATH 1004  Finite Probability and Applications
MATH100401 Preliminary Syllabus - 2015
MATH100402 Preliminary Syllabus - 2015
This course is an introduction to finite combinatorics and probability, emphasizing applications. Topics include finite sets and partitions, enumeration, probability, expectation, and random variables.
MATH100401  Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
MATH100402  Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.


MATH  110001  Calculus I
MATH110001 Preliminary Syllabus - 2015
Prerequisite: Trigonometry
MATH1100 is a first course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include a brief review of polynomials and trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, followed by discussion of limits, derivatives, and applications of differential calculus to real-world problem areas. The course concludes with an introduction to integration.
MATH110001  Session I, M W TH, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
No Class on Monday May 23 Commencement Day
MATH110002  Session II, M W TH, 9:00-11:15 a.m., Andrew Phillips

MATH 110101  Calculus II
MATH110101 Syllabus - 2015
MATH1101 is a second course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include an overview of integration, basic techniques for integration, a variety of applications of integration, and an introduction to (systems of) differential equations.
Session II, M W TH, 9:00-11:15 a.m., The Department

MATH 221001  Linear Algebra
MATH221001 Preliminary Syllabus - 2015
This course is an introduction to the techniques of linear algebra in Euclidean space. Topics covered include matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vectors in n-dimensional space, complex numbers, and eigenvalues. The course is required of mathematics majors and minors, but is also suitable for students in the social sciences, natural sciences, and management.
Session II, M W TH, 4:00-6:15 p.m.

MATH 3353  Statistics
MATH335301 Syllabus - 2016
MATH335302 Syllabus - 2016
Introductory course in inferential statistics covering the description of sample data, probability, the binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation and hypothesis-testing. Designed for students in business, nursing and the social sciences.
MATH 335301 Session I, M TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Marie Clote
MATH 335302 Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Dan Chambers



OPER 113501  Business Statistics
OPER113501 Syllabus 2016

This course focuses on the analytical tools of statistics that are applicable to management practice and decision making. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, and regression.
May 18–June 22, M W, 1:00-4:30 p.m., Paul Berger
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
No Class Monday May 23, Commencement Day

 

PHIL 1005  Basic Problems of Philosophy
PHIL100501 Preliminary Syllabus 2015
PHIL100502 Preliminary Syllabus 2015
This course introduces students to the problems and procedures of the Western philosophical tradition. Examines selected works of such key thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Descartes, Locke and Rousseau.
PHIL100501, Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Gregory Floyd
PHIL100502, Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Marina Marren

PHIL 108601  Ethical Identities and Personhood
PHIL108601 Syllabus 2016 

This course explores contemporary approaches to personhood, including philosophical, theological, and scientific contributions to concepts such as uniqueness and particularity, subjectivity and desire, relationality and communion; freedom and ethical responsibility. In the second half of this course, we address the implications of our investigations to specific contemporary issues, including the influence of  technology (e.g. social media, artificial intelligence), market economies, and consumerism on our self-understanding as persons and ethical beings. Throughout this course, we will continually return to two fundamental questions: 1) Who am I? and 2) Who should I become? Our readings and class discussion will assist in formulating answers to these fundamental questions, helping to uncover some of the hidden assumptions guiding our understanding of ourselves. No special background in philosophy will be assumed for this introductory course.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Brian Becker

PHIL 125201  Practical Logic 
PHIL125201 Syllabus 2015
A course not in the "new logic" (symbolic, or mathematical, logic) but in the "old logic" (ordinary language logic) invented by Aristotle and used for 2300 years in all the humanities. Includes such topics as definition, contradiction, syllogisms, implied premises, induction, and analogy. The course includes the commonsensical philosophical bases for this logic and also many practical applications to reading, interpreting, evaluating, and inventing arguments, especially in dialogs. Weekly quizzes, extra credit opportunities, and a take-home final exam. Texts: (1) SOCRATIC LOGIC, (2) THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Kreeft

PHIL 151001  Ethics
This course introduces students to the main schools of
ethical thought in the Western philosophical tradition. We examine works by philosophers such as Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, and we ask how the ethical systems developed by these figures can help us to think through issues like economic inequality, the treatment of animals, and euthanasia.
May 18–June 22, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Marina Marren
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20


PHIL 228401  Political Philosophy
The goal of this course is to reflect philosophically on the question: What does it mean to belong to a political community? Exploring this question will involve asking other questions, including, What are my obligations towards others and their obligations towards me? What is nature of a law? Should it be obeyed? Always? We will pursue these questions in conversation with the authors and primary texts of political philosophy. We will begin by examining the classic texts by Plato and Aristotle and the ideas of community and virtue that animate the Greek polis. Next we will turn to the Realpolitik of Machiavelli and Hobbes, as well as the responses of Locke and Rousseau. Finally we will conclude with a selection of contemporary authors including Martin Luther King. Throughout the course we will put our readings in conversation with contemporary issues regarding political belonging and participation, e.g., debates about immigration and the refugee crisis as well as the ethics of voting.
June 27–Aug 3, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Gregory Floyd

PHIL 228701  The Meaning of Work and Leisure
PHIL228701 Syllabus 2016
We spend much of our lives working, or preparing ourselves to work. We spend much of the rest of our time pursuing leisure. But what are our goals in doing so? How important is it for our work to be meaningful? Is leisure simply the absence of work, or something more? And what role do each of these play in a fulfilling life? From Aristotle to Adam Smith, from Rousseau to Max Weber, this course will study various accounts of what work and leisure have been, and what their ideal forms might be. The course will conclude by considering the coming age of technologically automated physical and mental labor, and its impact on the future of work and leisure.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jon Burmeister

 

PHYS 210001  Introduction to Physics I (Calculus) * 4 Credit course *
Prerequisite: Calculus I; may be taken concurrently.
Corequisite: PHYS 2110 Recitation

PHYS210001 Syllabus - 2015
A calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics include classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, hydrostatics and fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.   4-credit course
June 6 - June 30, M T TH, 6:00-10:00 p.m., Jan Engelbrecht


PHYS 205001  Introductory Physics Laboratory I
PHYS201001 Syllabus
Lab fee required, $205. A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in mechanics and acoustics. This lab meets three times per week. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2100.
June 6 - June 30, M T TH, 4:00-5:50 p.m., Andrzej Herczynski

PHYS 210101  Introduction to Physics II * 4 Credit course *
Corequesite: PHYS 2111 Recitation
Second session of a calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics are electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and electromagnetic waves, topics in physical optics, and basic concepts of special relativity and quantum physics.  4-credit course
July 5 - July 28, M T TH, 6:00-10:00 p.m., Christian Engelbrecht
* NO CLASS MONDAY JULY 4 - MAKEUP CLASS WEDNESDAY JULY 6 *

PHYS 205101  Introductory Physics Laboratory II
Lab fee required, $205. A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in electricity and magnetism and physical optics. This lab meets three times per week. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2101.
July 5 - July 28, M T TH, 4:00-5:50 p.m., Andrzej Herczynski
* NO CLASS MONDAY JULY 4 - MAKEUP CLASS WEDNESDAY JULY 6 *

PHYS 211001  Introduction to Physics I Recitation * Discussion; 0 Credit course *

Corequisite: PHYS 2100
Problem solving and discussion of topics in a small-class setting.
June  7–June 30, Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 PM - 2:40PM, Bolun Chen

PHYS 211101  Introduction to Physics II Recitation * Discussion; 0 credit course *
Corequisite: PHYS 2101

Problem solving and discussion of topics in a small-class setting.
July 7–July 28, Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 PM - 2:40PM, Bolun Chen 

 

POLI 104101  Fundamental Concepts of Politics
POLI104001 Preliminary Syllabus
This is an introduction to the study of politics through a consideration of some of the basic elements associated with governing: the political association, justice, constitutions, equality, liberty, conflict among citizens and between citizens and governments, conflict among governments. Each of the course instructors uses a different set of readings, drawing on a mix of political philosophy texts, works on international politics, novels, biographies. Emphasis is on interesting and important readings, discussion, and writing.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Brendan Bucy

POLI 106101  Indroduction to American Politics
POLI106101 Preliminary Syllabus
An overview of contemporary American government and politics focusing on how the institutions envisioned by the Framers of the Constitution (Congress, the judiciary, the executive) function today. Particular emphasis will be placed on how developments since the 1960s have affected the interaction of national, state, and local governmental actors, political participation, the articulation of interests, and policy formulation and implementation. Topics covered will include the media, public interest and advocacy organizations, campaign technologies and consultants, and public policy research institutes (think tanks). Whenever possible, comparisons between the U.S. and other advanced industrial democracies will be explored.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Brendan Bucy

POLI 351001  Globalization
This course examines the political, economic, social and cultural implications of the increasingly integrated world system. The course focuses on conflicting assessments of international institutions (IMF, World Bank, WTO) and political governance; the impact of economic integration; and the effects of globalization on state sovereignty, democracy, and social cohesion.  Specific case studies will include:  globalization and the environment; globalization, gender, and work; globalization and immigration/migration; globalization and the illicit economy, and anti-globalization social movements and activism.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Paul Christensen

POLI 352701 Terrorism, Insurgency, and Political Violence
POLI352701 Syllabus 2016
Terrorism and insurgency dominate the headlines today, but how much do we really know about these forms of political violence? Are they inventions from the modern era, or do they have a deeper past? What drives an individual to join an armed group? Why do some groups choose to employ violence, while others do not? Are terrorism and insurgency effective political tactics? Just how significant is the threat of terrorism? This course will address these and other questions, while introducing students to relevant analytical frameworks, theories, and cases concerning terrorism, insurgency, and related forms of political violence.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Peter Krause

 

PSYC 111101  Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science
PSYC111101 Syllabus - 2015
This course is one of two introductory courses required for  BC  Psychology majors, along with PS1110. This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.
Session II, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Janice D'Avignon

PSYC 112001  Introduction to Behavioral Statistics and Research I
PSYC112001 Syllabus 2016
This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to statistics used in the behavioral sciences. Students will be introduced to the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential statistics. Throughout the course, the statistical topics will be discussed within the context of behavioral research, providing students with an overview of some common research designs. Topics will include descriptive statistics, data displays, probability, t-tests, and one-way ANOVA. 
Session II, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m., Michelle Hurst

PSYC 224201  Personality Theories
PSYC224201 Syllabus 2015

This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the understanding of character and personality.
Session II, T TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m., Donnah Canavan

PSYC 226801  Psychological Development Through the Life Span
PSYC226801 Syllabus 2015
Introduces the issues underlying the developmental process: infant knowledge, the nature of human attachment, separation, male and female differences, the meaning of adulthood, the interaction of physiological and psychological processes and the predictability of human development.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Michael Moore

PSYC 227201  Cognitive Psychology: Mental Processes and their Neural Substrates
PSYC227201 Syllabus 2016
This course introduces the scientific study of mental function from an information processing perspective. The course examines how information is processed and transformed by the mind to control complex human behavior. Specific topics include the history of cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, attention, perception, consciousness, short-term and long-term memory, mental imagery, language, decision-making, and problem solving. Course material will be drawn from work with clinical populations (e.g., people who have sustained brain injury) as well as from work with non-injured populations. Class sessions will be devoted to lecture, discussion, demonstrations, and (if practical) student presentations.
Session I, M W, 8:15-11:45 a.m., Sean McEvoy

PSYC 227601  Biological Psychology
Why can two people look at the same dress yet perceive it to be two different colors? Why can the sight of dessert make us feel hungry even after a large meal? These types of questions pertaining to human behavior and cognition are investigated by psychology and neuroscience researchers. This course will introduce students to the neural and biological bases that support a variety of human behaviors and cognitive processes, including sensation, perception, learning, memory, emotion, hormones, drugs, and psychological disorders. All topics will be taught at an introductory-level and geared to psychology majors.
Session I, M W, 6:00-9:15p.m., Jessica Karanian

PSYC 2277  Psychology of Learning
PSYC227701 Syllabus 2016
PSYC227702 Syllabus 2016
A college student, a dog, and a rat walk into a classroom... Despite all their differences, they all learn the same ways. Learning is a critical aspect of our day-to-day lives. It is necessary for adaption and survival by enabling our experiences to alter our behavior. This course will cover basic theories and methods in the field of learning, including the roles of conditioning, imitation, and memory.
PSYC 227701, Session I, T H, 6:00-9:15p.m.
PSYC 227702, Session II, T H, 6:00-9:15p.m.

PSYC 227801  Psychology of Thinking  
Most people acknowledge that activities like solving a math problem or playing the piano require thinking, and that thinking is a process that is embedded into our daily lives. But what is thinking? In this class, we will examine how psychologists conceptualize broad habits of mind like persistence, imagination, teamwork, and creativity, determine some areas of daily life that teach these ways of thinking for school children, and speculate how we can measure each of these so-called "soft skills." This class requires engagement, reflection, and in-class participation rather than memorization of facts.
Session II, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m.

PSYC 228101  Sports Psychology
PSYC228101 Syllabus 2016
A survey of the field of sports psychology with emphasis on the role of athletics throughout the life cycle. Examines the recent trend of increased participation by children in organized sports at earlier ages, the impact of parental dynamics, the growing interest in continuing athletic participation over the life cycle, the economic and social expectations and their implications for psychological development. Discusses issues addressed by sports psychologists including those relating to performance, stress and self esteem.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Michael Moore

 

SOCY 1001  Introductory Sociology
SOCY100101 Preliminary Syllabus 2016
SOCY100102 Preliminary Syllabus 2015
This course conveys a sense of the history of sociology and introduces students to the most essential concepts, ideas, theories, and methods of the discipline. Special topics may include interaction in everyday life, sociology of the family, gender roles, race and ethnic relations, and the sociology of work, among others. We will deal with fundamental questions about what it means to be a human being living in a society at a given moment in history.
SOCY100101, Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jared Fitzgerald
SOCY100102, Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jared Fitzgerald

SOCY 1049  Social Problems
SOCY104901 Syllabus 2016 - Prof. Yanmaz
SOCY104902 Syllabus 2016 - Attwood-Charles
This course is an exploration of different sociological approaches to the study of social problems and social trends in contemporary society. It examines the linkages between social structures/institutions, culture and human experience. The course emphasizes theoretical research issues, especially how, and to what degree, the understanding of social problems are a direct result of the processes used to define social problems as well as the research methods and procedures used to investigate them. Students will learn to critique popular discourses from a critical sociological perspective and will be encouraged to form their own opinions and critiques.
SOCY104901, Session I, M  W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Selen Yanmaz
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20
SOCY104902, Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., William Attwood-Charles

 

THEO 100101  Biblical Heritage I
THEO100101 Syllabus - 2015
The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Yonder Gillihan

THEO 100201  Biblical Heritage II
THEO100201 Syllabus - 2015
The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.
Session II, T  TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Yonder Gillihan

THEO 101601  Introduction to Christian Theology I
THEO101601 Syllabus - 2015
This is the first session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
Session I, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m., Jessica Coblentz
No Class Monday May 16; Meets on Friday May 20

THEO 101701  Introduction to Christian Theology II
THEO101701 Syllabus - 2015
This is the second session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement.. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
Session II, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Jessica Coblentz

THEO 116101  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives I
THEO116101 Syllabus - 2015
This is the first session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, secrets of love and death, enduring values to live by, and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts among traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
Session I, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Christopher Conway

THEO 116201  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives II
THEO116201 Syllabus - 2015
This is the second session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, and secrets of love and death, as well as enduring values to live by and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts between traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
Session II, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m., Christopher Conway