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Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate course offerings for Summer 2015 are listed below. Most Woods College graduate courses are restricted to students in the MS programs. These courses are listed at: http://www.bc.edu/schools/advstudies/courses/graduate/summerelectives.html

 

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ACCT 102101   Financial Accounting
ACCT102101 Syllabus
This course develops an understanding of the basic elements of financial accounting and the role of accounting in society. Students are introduced to financial statements and to the fundamental accounting concepts, procedures, and terminology employed in contemporary financial reporting. The skills necessary to analyze business transactions, to prepare and comprehend financial statements, and to examine a firm's profitability and financial condition are developed.
Students are required to use the Internet to conduct a financial statement analysis project.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Catherine Byrne

BIOL 130001  Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL130001 Syllabus
Corequisite for Boston College students: BIOL 1310
This introductory course lays the foundation for the understanding of human anatomy and physiology. The first portion of the course covers cellular and molecular aspects of eukaryotic cell function: basic chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle control, and genetics. The course continues with the study of several organ systems beginning with the Integument, which is followed by the Skeletal and Muscular Systems, and ending with the Nervous System. The cellular and molecular basis for the functions of these systems is an integral element of this portion of the course.
Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 131001  Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
BIOL131001 Syllabus
Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the various structures and principles discussed in BIOL 1300 through the use of anatomical models, physiological experiments, and limited dissection. Lab fee required. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 22–July 8, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 132001  Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL132001 Syllabus
Corequisite for Boston College students: BIOL 1330
The second portion of this introductory course is a continuation of BIOL 1300/1310, with a primary emphasis on the physiology of the major body systems. Systems studied in this course include the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. While the physiological functions under normal conditions are emphasized, relevant disease or dysfunctional conditions are also discussed. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 133001  Anatomy and Physiology Lab II
BIOL133001 Syllabus
A continuation of BIOL 1310. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 13–July 29, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 200001  Molecules and Cells
BIOL200001 Syllabus
Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling and genetics.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 201001  Ecology and Evolution
BIOL201001 Syllabus
Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution, and human ecology.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 210001  General Biology Laboratory I
BIOL210001 Syllabus
The first part of a two-part introductory biology laboratory course designed for non-biology majors preparing for graduate programs in health professions. This course teaches basic laboratory skills, including microscopy, spectrophotometry, analytical electrophoresis and molecular cloning.  Students are introduced to the principles of experimental design, data analysis and data interpretation. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in biochemistry, cell physiology and molecular biology.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 211001  General Biology Laboratory II
BIOL211001 Syllabus
The continuation of BIOL2100. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in organismic biology, ecology and field biology.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 220001  Microbiology for Health Professionals
Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I and II.
BIOL220001 Syllabus
This course is a study of the basic physiological and biochemical activities of bacteria and viruses. Emphasis will be placed on virulence factors and the mechanism by which a variety of microorganisms and viruses establish an infection. The use of anti-viral drugs and antibiotics, the host immune response to microbial infection, and the effectiveness of various vaccination strategies will also be discussed.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Chris Reisch

BIOL 221001  Microbiology for Health Professionals Laboratory
BIOL221001 Syllabus
Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacterial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Holli Rowedder

CHEM 110901  General Chemistry I
CHEM110901 Syllabus and CHEM110901 Schedule
This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships and chemical equilibrium and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
June 15–July 6, M T W TH F, 8:30-11:15 a.m.
William Griffin

CHEM 111101  General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM111101 Lab Syllabus
Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
June 15–July 2, M T W TH, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m.
William Griffin

CHEM 111001  General Chemistry II
CHEM111001 Syllabus and CHEM111001 Schedule
This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships, chemical equilibrium, and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
July 7–July 31, T W F M, 8:30-11:15 a.m.
William Griffin


CHEM 111201  General Chemistry Laboratory II
CHEM111201 Lab Syllabus
Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
July 6–July 29, M T W, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m.
William Griffin


CHEM 223101  Organic Chemistry I
CHEM223101 Syllabus
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties, reaction mechanisms, and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
June 15–July 7, M T TH F, 9:30-12 noon
The Department

CHEM 223301  Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM223301 Syllabus
Students will acquire fundamental organic lab techniques in the context of principles learned in CHEM2231 and CHEM2232. Reactions that are studied in class will be performed in the laboratory.
June 15–July 7, M T TH, 12:30-4:30 p.m.
The Department

CHEM 223201  Organic Chemistry II
CHEM223201 Syllabus
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties and reaction mechanisms and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
July 9–July 31, TH F M T, 9:30-12 noon
The Department

CHEM 223401  Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
CHEM 223401 Syllabus
Students will acquire fundamental organic lab techniques in the context of principles learned in CHEM2231 and CHEM2232. Reactions that are studied in class will be performed in the laboratory.
July 9–July 30, TH M T, 12:30-4:30 p.m.
The Department
 


COMM 1030  Public Speaking
COMM103001 Syllabus - Prof. Ingram
COMM103002 Syllabus - Prof. Hogan

This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key elements of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speaking and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and expository addresses. This is a performance course.
COMM 103001  May 13–June 17, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Brett Ingram
COMM 103002  June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Lindsay Hogan

COMM 223201  Topics in Intercultural Communication
COMM223201 Syllabus
This course will explore the challenges individuals and institutions often face when they attempt to communicate across cultural barriers, with particular emphasis on obstacles posed by ideological constructions of difference such as race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, and sexuality. We will cultivate a critical perspective on relevant conflicts and controversies using the theoretical resources offered by the field of media and cultural studies. Our aim is to foster both greater understanding of potential impediments to humane cross-cultural communication, and more sophisticated strategies of intervention.
May 13–June 17, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Marcus Breen

COMM 227801  Social Media
COMM227801 Syllabus
This course examines the cultural, economic and political aspects of emerging computer-mediated communication technologies known as “social media,” including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. Students will critically interrogate the impact of social media on relationships, identity, social/political movements, branding/marketing, and everyday practices. The course will also cover practical social media skills with assignments and activities involving hands-on experience using social media technologies to create and distribute content.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Matt Sienkiewicz


COMM 444901  Crisis Communication
COMM444901 Syllabus
This course is designed to examine events and situations that potentially threaten the viability of an organization. Attention is devoted to developing an effective crisis communication plan, speaking to multiple stakeholders, decision-making under pressure, and resolving–rather than litigating–organizational problems. Among the studies examined are the Tylenol product tampering incident, the Exxon Valdez accident, the Union Carbide gas leak, the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster, the Three Mile Island accident, and the Pepsi syringe hoax.
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Donald Fishman

EESC 114001  Our Mobile Earth
EESC114001 Syllabus
This course will provide you with an introduction to the structure of Earth and the dynamic processes that continuously shape and remodel its surface. During class, we will discuss the formation and evolution of the oceans and continents within the framework of the modern theory of plate tectonics. The locations, causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes are presented. The dynamics within Earth which drive the tectonic plates are outlined.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Jennifer Cole


EESC 116301  Environmental Issues and Resources
EESC116301 Syllabus
Learn about the major processes at work inside and on the surface of the Earth. Acquire skills that will promote logical decision-making about evaluating and purchasing land and property. Each class is designed to examine the facts, historical background, and through homework exercises, in-class exercises and virtual labs, provide experience in analyzing and solving real-world problems associated with environmental issues, resources and sustainability. Demonstrations, videos, readings and a campus field trip underscore important concepts and applications.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Kenneth Galli

ECON 1131  Principles of Economics I — Micro
ECON113101 Syllabus - Prof. Matamoros
ECON113102 Syllabus - Prof. Wewel
This course is an analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the interaction of households and business firms in a modern Western economy. The appropriate role of government intervention is examined, and basic analytical tools are applied to current economic problems.
ECON113101  May 12-June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Miguel Matamoros
ECON113102  June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Solvejg Wewel


ECON 1132  Principles of Economics II — Macro
ECON113201 Syllabus - Prof. Lindner
ECON113202 Syllabus - Prof. Ezer
This course is an analysis of national income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and international aspects of macroeconomic policy.
ECON 113201  May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Lindner
ECON 113202  June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mehmet Ezer


CANCELLED  -  ECON 115101  Statistics
This course is focused on probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation of parameters, tests of hypotheses, regression, and forecasting.
This course does not satisfy the Statistics requirement for Boston College Arts & Sciences Economics majors.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Lauren Velasco


ECON 336101  Monetary Theory and Policy
Prerequisite: Macroeconomic Theory
ECON336101 Syllabus
An analysis of the operation and behavior of financial markets and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial intermediaries, including commercial banks and the central bank. The money supply process and alternative theories of the demand for money are considered, as well as their implications for monetary policy and macroeconomic performance.
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Hossein S. Kazemi


ECON 336501  Public Finance
Prerequisite: Microeconomic Theory
ECON336501 Syllabus
This is a course in the microeconomics of the public sector. We will discuss the rationale for the government's role in a market economy, major expenditure programs, and the theory and structure of the tax system. The focus will be on the federal (as opposed to state and local) government's expenditure and tax programs, with special attention given to topics of current concern.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mark Kazarosian



WRITING

ENGL 1010  First Year Writing Seminar
ENGL101001 Syllabus - Prof. Puente
ENGL101002  Syllabus - Prof. Kharpertian
Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a course-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets twice a week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.
ENGL 101001  May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Lorenzo Puente
ENGL 101002  June 22–July 29, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Kiara Kharpertian



LITERATURE

ENGL 1080  Literature Core
ENGL108001 Syllabus - Prof. Kharpertian
ENGL108002 Syllabus - Fr. Farrell
In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide an introduction to literary genres.
ENGL 108001  May 13–June 17, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Kiara Kharpertian
ENGL 108002  June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Robert Farrell, S.J.


ADEN 228901  New Forms, New Fictions
ADEN228901 Syllabus
This course studies literary adventurers struggling to represent the changing world of the Twentieth Century. Confronting altered personal and political realities, these writers experiment with new forms and fictions; texts reflect dramatic changes in ethics and aesthetics. A variety of works are read: Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying.
May 12–June 18, T TH 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Robert Farrell, S.J.

UNAS 111501  Writing Style: Sentence Mechanics*
* NOTE - This is a 1-credit course.
UNAS111501 Syllabus
From a stylistic perspective, this course examines one of the building blocks of any piece of writing—sentences. Although writing a sentence is often taken for granted, in fact writing even a single sentence involves many choices. For any sentence, usually there isn’t only one way to grammatically structure it, isn’t only one way to arrange its parts, isn’t only one way to word it. This course unpacks important stylistic choices, demonstrating that how a sentence is written determines what meaning it conveys. To better appreciate sentence mechanics, students will analyze the writing style in published articles and posts, and will also complete short writing exercises and assignments and analyze their own writing style. Through this practice, students will learn how to write sentences that are clear and effective.
June 8–June 18, M T TH 4:30–6:35 p.m.
Dustin Rutledge

FILM 224401  Biography and Autobiography
FILM224401 Syllabus
The course will be structured around the genres of biography and autobiography and the ways in which the written genre is transformed and reinterpreted through film. Through analysis and close reading of texts, students will have opportunities to reflect upon the effectiveness of understanding personal narratives and connecting the individual experience to a larger cultural/historical context. As society moves to a more visual approach for understanding the challenges in life, studying adaptation from the written word to the visual expression can be useful in increasing awareness of the human condition and learning about the self. In addition to assigned readings and films, students will be provided with an extensive filmography of adaptions as resources for their research papers. The course will cover a selection of classic and contemporary works of literature/film, with a focus on analysis of the genre of autobiography and biography through modern interpretations.
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Michalczyk and Susan Michalczyk

FILM 227801  Film, Literature and Law
FILM227801 Syllabus
Interest in the rapport between film and literature as it relates to the law intrigues us as much today as ever. Literature captures the drama of a legal trial or an investigation into a brutal, racial murder. Film then takes this rich material and shapes it into a compelling form with dynamic visuals and other narrative techniques. The course explores the power of story-telling and the impact of film to embody and inhabit law and its relationship to ideas about inferiority, liberty, citizenry, race, justice, crime, punishment, and social order. Film adaptations from short stories, plays, and novellas will comprise the body of the curriculum.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
John Michalczyk



MFIN 102101  Basic Finance
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or equivalent.
MFIN102101 Syllabus
This is a course designed to survey the areas of corporate financial management, money and capital markets, and financial institutions. Corporate finance topics include the time value of money, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, financial analysis, and working capital management. Financial markets and institutions cover the role of financial intermediaries and instruments as they function in a complex economic system.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Drew Hession-Kunz

HIST 102701  Modern History I: Political and Cultural History of Modernism
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. The Monday class session will meet in person, and the Wednesday class session will be conducted online. Consult Syllabus for exact dates and times.
HIST102701 Syllabus
This is the first of two courses that survey the historical development of Europe from the Renaissance to the present, with the intention of explaining how the unique Western society in which we live today came into being. The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has made the development of Europe a key to understanding the modern world as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on political, diplomatic, and cultural factors, but social, economic and religious aspects are also covered. This course will cover the period from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Martin Menke

HIST 102801  Modern History II
HIST102801 Syllabus
The continuation of HIST1027.  (This section is not  a hybrid course.)
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Peter Moloney

HIST 103901  The West and the World: 1500-1789
HIST103901 Syllabus
The past five hundred years witnessed the rise to power and prosperity of Western societies. This course examines the significance of the beginning of global relationships. Includes issues in early modern European history, as well as early exploration, the colonization of America, the African slave trade and the Atlantic economic dependency.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Karen Miller

HIST 104001  The West and The World II
HIST104001 Syllabus
This is the second of two courses that survey the historical development of Europe from the Renaissance to the present, with the intention of explaining how the unique Western society in which we live today came into being. The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has made the development of Europe a key to understanding the modern world as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on political, diplomatic, and cultural factors, but social, economic and religious aspects are also covered. This course will cover the period from the fall of Napoleon to the present.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Peter Moloney

HIST 242101  American Presidency
HIST242101 Syllabus
This course examines the single most important position of power in our political system, the men who shaped it, and the elections that placed them in that office. Although the course begins with the drafting of the Constitution, the focus is on the twentieth century.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
Mark Gelfand


HIST 283001  History of Boston’s Neighborhoods
HIST283001 Syllabus
An historical look at Boston explores parts of its “neighborhoods,” including the old West End, the South End, the North End, South Boston, East Boston, Charlestown, Dorchester, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Hyde Park, and West Roxbury. Walking and bus tours are planned during the regular class meetings.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Chris Hannan


HIST 283101  Modern America: 1945 to the Present
HIST283101 Syllabus

An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women’s movement, the Reagan years and life in the 1980’s, 1990’s to the present.
June 22–July 29, M W, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
Alex Bloom


HIST 284701  The Americas: A History from 1492-2012
HIST284701 Syllabus
On the eve of the discovery of the Americas, Mexico and South America boasted the most complex and productive economies and governments in all the Americas. Throughout the colonial period, these regions continued to produce the most money and attract the most colonists. However, things changed. Today the United States and Canada possess a success and stability in government and economy largely absent in other American countries. Why and when did this change occur? This course attempts to answer those questions.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mark Christensen

Courses listed below are open ONLY to students enrolled in a Boston College degree program.
 

ADIT 130001  Coding Boot Camp
ADIT130001 Link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc
During this two-week summer coding boot camp students are taught the fundamentals of coding using HTML, the markup language that every Web site and many mobile phone apps are built with, and the industry-standard JavaScript programming language. Designed specifically for individuals who have never programmed before (or have very little prior experience), this camp teaches participants how to create their own Web sites from scratch and how to bring them to life with JavaScript.
July 6–July 17, M T W TH F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Aaron Walsh and Barbara Mikolacczak

ADIT 134101  Social Media: To The Web and Beyond
ONLINE course.
ADIT134101 link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc
This course addresses current and forthcoming Social Media technologies, Web sites, software programs and mobile apps (iPhone and Android apps) with a special focus on privacy and security. Rich and interactive forms of communication, collaboration, and socialization are the heart of Social Media, but come at a price: privacy breaches, identity theft, cyber-stalkers and "online addictions" are among the many issues that we must grapple with. In this unique course students learn how to harness the power of Social Media while protecting themselves and guarding their privacy. Technologies covered in this course include Social Networking (Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Tinder, Snapchat, etc.); video and photo sharing (YouTube, Vimeo, Twitch, Instagram, Imgur, etc.); video games and virtual worlds (Minecraft, World of Warcraft, League of Legends, Second Life, etc.), as well as a forthcoming generation of Social Media technologies.
No auditors.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m. ONLINE
Barbara Mikolajczak and Aaron Walsh

ADIT 137501  Future Tech and Emerging Media
ONLINE course
ADIT137501 Link to Online Syllabus - Google Doc
With an emphasis on critical thinking and analysis, this survey course prepares students for a future shaped by high technology and digital media. Students in this course work in teams to compose and present comprehensive reports on emerging technologies that will directly impact their personal and professional lives. Through group discussions and open debates students will closely examine and consider the ethical issues that these technologies raise.
June 23–July 20, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m. ONLINE
Barbara Mikolajczak and Aaron Walsh

 

ADJO 223001  News Writing
ADJO223001 Syllabus
Since the art of communication prospers only when we fully realize the power of words, this course is designed to expand your powers of expression, both written and verbal. We will explore what some great communicators (Lincoln, Churchill, William Faulkner, Martin Luther King, Joan Didion, John Updike, others) have to teach us about precise expression. We will also glean lessons from such contemporary sources as journalism (the daily newspaper), narrative nonfiction (magazines and books), arts criticism (movies, music, theater), the advertising industry, and the blogosphere. A further goal of the course is to help students develop a large and vital vocabulary, and an understanding of usage, that will enable them to write and speak with precision.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Don Aucoin

ADJO 334901  Politics and the Media: Power and Influence
ADJO334901 Syllabus
An analysis of mass media’s impact on the workings of the American system. The media’s interaction and influence on political institutions, on the presidential selection process, on national and international events, on office holders, politicians, heads of state and the treatment of economic upheaval and violence are analyzed. Considers the media’s role in the coverage of war, especially in a terrorist world.
May 13–June 17, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Marie Natoli

FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

RLRL 116301  Boston’s French Connection

(All in English)
RLRL116301 Syllabus
Students will explore the following topics: early French explorers and the Acadian experience, Boston’s Puritans and French Huguenots, the American and French Revolutions, French influences on Boston’s Catholics and Unitarian Transcendentalists, French influences on Boston’s musicians, painters, sculptors, architects, politicians and writers, and contributions of the different Francophone peoples in Boston. Students will develop skill in analyzing historical and literary texts and will examine closely passages in Alexis de Tocqueville’s "Democracy in America" and Simone de Beauvoir’s "America Day by Day".
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
James Flagg


FRENCH

FREN 110901  Intermediate French I

FREN110901 Syllabus
The emphasis will be on building upon prior study and developing a practical knowledge of the French language, as spoken by native speakers in contemporary France. Our goal is to help students develop oral and written proficiency in the language. The emphasis is on contemporary French culture and history, vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight. Classroom work will be supplemented with web-based assignments and an online audio program.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Sarah Bilodeau


FREN 111001  Intermediate French II
FREN111001 Syllabus
This course is a continuation of FREN1109 (Intermediate French I) and is also open to students who have placed into this course. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary and develop their fluency, both written and oral. Emphasis is on active student participation and a broadening of historical and cultural knowledge. Francophone culture will be explored through literary excerpts by authors from France, Africa, and the Caribbean. Classroom work will be supplemented with film, web-based assignments and an online audio program.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Andrea Javel


SPANISH

SPAN 100501  Intensive Beginning Spanish I

SPAN100501 and SPAN100601 Syllabus
This two-course sequence covers in six weeks the first and second semesters of a full-year elementary Spanish course. A practical knowledge of the Spanish language as spoken by native speakers will be developed in five areas: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competence. Specific objectives include attaining at least a novice high level of oral proficiency. Because this is an intensive course, daily homework assignments, regular attendance and class participation are essential.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Christopher Wood


SPAN 100601  Intensive Beginning Spanish II
SPAN100501 and SPAN100601 Syllabus
You will begin to narrate personal and objective experiences using past tenses and to express needs, advice, doubts and opinions through the use of the subjunctive mood.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Christopher Wood


SPAN 101501  Elementary Spanish I
SPAN 101501 and 101601 Syllabus
This introductory course is designed for students with no prior Spanish experience as well as those who have had some high school Spanish. Elementary Spanish I provides a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of student activities. Students will interact in Spanish with the instructor and with classmates. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of basic communicative tasks.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Silvana Falconi


SPAN 101601 Elementary Spanish II
SPAN 101501 and 101601 Syllabus
Elementary Spanish II is the second course in the Elementary Spanish I and II sequence. It continues to provide a strong foundation in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing as well as exploring the products, practices and perspectives that are unique to Hispanic cultures. This course follows a communicative approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when student activities involve critical thinking about real-world information. Students will interact in Spanish with the instructor and with classmates. By the end of this course, students should be able to successfully handle in Spanish a significant number of communicative and writing tasks in different time frames.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Silvana Falconi


SPAN 111501 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN111501 Syllabus
Intermediate Spanish I is the first course in the second-year sequence. It continues to develop and strengthen students’ proficiency in the Spanish language as well as to increase their cultural understanding. Emphasis remains on the four skills and on critical thinking. Throughout the course, students will develop fluency and accuracy, and focus on communication. They will expand the vocabulary and enhance their understanding of essential Spanish grammar concepts. Short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials will provide opportunities to learn to appreciate of cultural differences and impart authentic insight into the Hispanic world.
June 22–July 9, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Karen Daggett


SPAN 111601 Intermediate Spanish II
SPAN111601 Syllabus
Intermediate Spanish II is the second course in the second-year sequence with a continued emphasis on the four skills and on critical thinking. This course focuses on vocabulary building, the examination of some of the finer grammar points, and moving students towards a more complex level of comprehension and expression. Students will work with short literary texts, cultural readings and audiovisual materials. After successful completion of this course, the foreign language requirement will be fulfilled for schools that require a 4th-semester proficiency.
July 13–July 30, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Nilza Gonzalez-Pedemonte

MATH 1004  Finite Probability
MATH100401 Preliminary Syllabus
MATH100402 Preliminary Syllabus
This course is an introduction to finite combinatorics and probability, emphasizing applications. Topics include finite sets and partitions, enumeration, probability, expectation, and random variables.
MATH 100401 June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department
MATH 100402 June 23–July 30, T TH, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
The Department


MATH  110001  Calculus I
MATH110001 Preliminary Syllabus
Prerequisite: Trigonometry
MATH1100 is a first course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include a brief review of polynomials and trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, followed by discussion of limits, derivatives, and applications of differential calculus to real-world problem areas. The course concludes with an introduction to integration.
MATH110001  May 13–June 18, M W TH, 9:00-11:15 a.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29 
Diana Hubbard
MATH110002  June 22-July 30, M W TH, 9:00-11:15 a.m.
The Department

MATH 110101  Calculus II
MATH110101 Preliminary Syllabus
MATH1101 is a second course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include an overview of integration, basic techniques for integration, a variety of applications of integration, and an introduction to (systems of) differential equations.
June 22–July 30, M W TH, 9:00-11:15 a.m.
Diana Hubbard

MATH 221001  Linear Algebra
MATH221001 Preliminary Syllabus
This course is an introduction to the techniques of linear algebra in Euclidean space. Topics covered include matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vectors in n-dimensional space, complex numbers, and eigenvalues. The course is required of mathematics majors and minors, but is also suitable for students in the social sciences, natural sciences, and management.
June 22-July 30, M W TH, 4:00-6:15 p.m.
The Department


MATH 3353  Statistics
MATH335301 Syllabus - Prof. Clote
MATH335302 Syllabus - Prof. Chambers
Introductory course in inferential statistics covering the description of sample data, probability, the binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation and hypothesis-testing. Designed for students in business, nursing and the social sciences.
MATH 335301 May 14–June 18, M TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Marie Clote
MATH 335302 June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Dan Chambers

PHIL 1005  Introduction to Basic Problems of Philosophy
PHIL100501 Preliminary Syllabus
PHIL100502 Preliminary Syllabus
This course introduces students to the problems and procedures of the Western philosophical tradition. Examines selected works of such key thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Descartes, Locke and Rousseau.
PHIL100501, May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
James Oldfield
PHIL100502, June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
James Oldfield


PHIL 108601  Ethical Identities and Personhood
PHIL108601 Syllabus 

This course explores contemporary approaches to personhood, including philosophical, theological, and scientific contributions to concepts such as uniqueness and particularity, subjectivity and desire, relationality and communion; freedom and ethical responsibility. In the second half of this course, we address the implications of our investigations to specific contemporary issues, including the influence of  technology (e.g. social media, artificial intelligence), market economies, and consumerism on our self-understanding as persons and ethical beings. Throughout this course, we will continually return to two fundamental questions: 1) Who am I? and 2) Who should I become? Our readings and class discussion will assist in formulating answers to these fundamental questions, helping to uncover some of the hidden assumptions guiding our understanding of ourselves. No special background in philosophy will be assumed for this introductory course.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Brian Becker

PHIL 125201  Practical Logic 
PHIL125201 Syllabus
A course not in the "new logic" (symbolic, or mathematical, logic) but in the "old logic" (ordinary language logic) invented by Aristotle and used for 2300 years in all the humanities. Includes such topics as definition, contradiction, syllogisms, implied premises, induction, and analogy. The course includes the commonsensical philosophical bases for this logic and also many practical applications to reading, interpreting, evaluating, and inventing arguments, especially in dialogs. Weekly quizzes, extra credit opportunities, and a take-home final exam. Texts: (1) SOCRATIC LOGIC, (2) THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Peter Kreeft
     

PHIL 228501  The American Dream: A Philosophical Investigation
PHIL228501 Syllabus
What does it mean to be an American in the 21st century, in the post-September 11th climate? How do we structure our society, how do we live together as neighbors, how do we adapt to the new realities? Students will emerge with greater knowledge about and curiosity concerning the social, economic, political, cultural and psychological processes that shape contemporary definitions of the self and identity and that contribute to the formation of behaviors in the 21st century. Through film, literature, and contemporary scholarship, the course surveys and engages some key concepts in Americans’ ways of life: their roots, their developments, the tension between them and the impact of a changing world. The course examines terms like freedom and equality, rights and obligations, liberal and conservative, security and fear, individual and community  and uses them for assessment and understanding.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Hessam Dehghani

*In Summer 2015, only Physics I and Lab I will be offered.  NO Physics II or Lab II.

PHYS 210001  Introduction to Physics I (Calculus)

Prerequisite: Calculus I; may be taken concurrently.
PHYS210001 Syllabus
A calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics include classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, hydrostatics and fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.
June 1–June 25, M T TH, 6:00-9:30 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht


PHYS 205001  Introductory Physics Laboratory I
PHYS201001 Syllabus
A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in mechanics and acoustics.This lab meets three times per week. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2100.
June 1–June 25, M W TH, 4:00-5:50 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht

POLI 104101  Fundamental Concepts of Politics
POLI104001 Preliminary Syllabus
This is an introduction to the study of politics through a consideration of some of the basic elements associated with governing: the political association, justice, constitutions, equality, liberty, conflict among citizens and between citizens and governments, conflict among governments. Each of the course instructors uses a different set of readings, drawing on a mix of political philosophy texts, works on international politics, novels, biographies. Emphasis is on interesting and important readings, discussion, and writing.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Gregory Burnep


POLI 106101  Indroduction to American Politics
POLI106101 Preliminary Syllabus
An overview of contemporary American government and politics focusing on how the institutions envisioned by the Framers of the Constitution (Congress, the judiciary, the executive) function today. Particular emphasis will be placed on how developments since the 1960s have affected the interaction of national, state, and local governmental actors, political participation, the articulation of interests, and policy formulation and implementation. Topics covered will include the media, public interest and advocacy organizations, campaign technologies and consultants, and public policy research institutes (think tanks). Whenever possible, comparisons between the U.S. and other advanced industrial democracies will be explored.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Gregory Burnep



PSYC 111101  Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science
PSYC111101 Syllabus
This course is one of two introductory courses required for  BC  Psychology majors, along with PS1110. This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.
June 22–July 29, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Janice D’Avignon

PSYC 2237  Psychology of the Actor
PSYC223701 Syllabus
PSYC223702 Syllabus
 
We are all consumers of acting - just consider the frequency with which humans watch dramas on TV, film, and stage. What is it that allows actors to enact a character in an imaginary world? This course explores the psychology of actors. Topics include early childhood signs of acting talent, personality traits of actors, cognitive processes used in acting, mental illnesses prevalent in actors, and how acting techniques could be used by non-actors in everyday life (e.g. for hypnosis, therapy, emotion regulation and expression, and increasing empathy). Where relevant, we will compare actors to other kinds of creative individuals.
PSYC223701, May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
M. E. Panero
PSYC223702, June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
M. E. Panero
  

PSYC 224201  Personality Theories
This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the understanding of character and personality.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Donnah Canavan

PSYC 226801  Psychological Development Through the Life Span
PSYC226801 Syllabus
Introduces the issues underlying the developmental process: infant knowledge, the nature of human attachment, separation, male and female differences, the meaning of adulthood, the interaction of physiological and psychological processes and the predictability of human development.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Michael Moore

PSYC 2271  Human Memory: Mind and Brain
PSYC227101 Syllabus
PSYC227102 Syllabus 

The ability to remember our past is critical to the human experience, yet we know from both personal anecdotes and laboratory research that our memory is often unreliable. This course will cover a range of topics in human memory, with an emphasis on memory failures, distortions, and diseases. Topics will be discussed from both neuroscience and cognitive psychology perspectives.
PSYC227101, May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Jessica Karanian
PSYC227102, June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Jessica Karanian 
  

PSYC 228101  Sports Psychology
PSYC228101 Syllabus
A survey of the field of sports psychology with emphasis on the role of athletics throughout the life cycle. Examines the recent trend of increased participation by children in organized sports at earlier ages, the impact of parental dynamics, the growing interest in continuing athletic participation over the life cycle, the economic and social expectations and their implications for psychological development. Discusses issues addressed by sports psychologists including those relating to performance, stress and self esteem.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Michael Moore


PSYC 228201  The Neurobiology of Motivated Behaviors
PSYC228201 Syllabus  

Motivated behaviors are critical for the survival of the individual as well as the species. The basic motivated behaviors of 1) reproduction, 2) defensive behavior, 3) foraging, and 4) ingestive behavior are innate and prominent across all species, including humans. The class will discuss how and why these behaviors are necessary for the survival of the species. The course will introduce students to the neural basis underlying both the typical, as well as aberrant, expression of these motivated behaviors.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15.
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29.
Sara Keefer


PSYC 3336  Clinical Psychology
PSYC333601 Syllabus - Prof. MacDonald
PSYC333602 Syllabus - Prof. Condie
Issues associated with the treatment of psychological disorders will be examined. The concepts of normality and pathology will be discussed in the context of various models of intervention. Several different schools of psychotherapy will be covered, with an emphasis on the theoretical assumptions and practical applications of each perspective. Studies on the effectiveness of psychotherapy will be reviewed. The clinical training and professional practices of psychologists will be discussed.
PSYC333601, May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15.
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29.
Heather MacDonald
PSYC333602, June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m   
Lois Condie

SOCY 1001  Introductory Sociology
SOCY100101 Preliminary Syllabus
SOCY100102 Preliminary Syllabus
This course conveys a sense of the history of sociology and introduces students to the most essential concepts, ideas, theories, and methods of the discipline. Special topics may include interaction in everyday life, sociology of the family, gender roles, race and ethnic relations, and the sociology of work, among others. We will deal with fundamental questions about what it means to be a human being living in a society at a given moment in history.
SOCY100101, May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Julia Bates
SOCY100102, June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Julia Bates

THEO 100101  Biblical Heritage I
THEO100101 Syllabus
The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Darr


THEO 100201  Biblical Heritage II
THEO100201 Syllabus
The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.
June 23–July 30, T  TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Darr


THEO 101601  Introduction to Christian Theology I
THEO101601 Syllabus
This is the first session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15.
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29.
James Daryn Henry


THEO 101701  Introduction to Christian Theology II
THEO101701 Preliminary Syllabus
This is the second session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement.. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m
James Daryn Henry

THEO 102301  Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation I
THEO102301 Syllabus
This course is the first session of a two-part exploration of the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first part of the course explores human existence as lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second part of the course considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit; the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ; and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators.
May 13–June 17, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 11; Meets on Friday May 15
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 29
Boyd Cooman


THEO 102401  Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation II
This is the second session of a two-part course exploring the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first part explores human existence lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second part considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit, the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ, and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators. Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 22–July 29, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department

THEO 116101  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives I
THEO116101 Syllabus
This is the first session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, secrets of love and death, enduring values to live by, and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts among traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
May 12–June 18, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Emma O'Donnell


THEO 116201  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives II
THEO116201 Syllabus
This is the second session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, and secrets of love and death, as well as enduring values to live by and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts between traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 23–July 30, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Emma O'Donnell


UNAS 111501  Writing Style: Sentence Mechanics*
* NOTE - This is a 1-credit course.
UNAS111501 Syllabus
From a stylistic perspective, this course examines one of the building blocks of any piece of writing—sentences. Although writing a sentence is often taken for granted, in fact writing even a single sentence involves many choices. For any sentence, usually there isn’t only one way to grammatically structure it, isn’t only one way to arrange its parts, isn’t only one way to word it. This course unpacks important stylistic choices, demonstrating that how a sentence is written determines what meaning it conveys. To better appreciate sentence mechanics, students will analyze the writing style in published articles and posts, and will also complete short writing exercises and assignments and analyze their own writing style. Through this practice, students will learn how to write sentences that are clear and effective.
June 8–June 18, M T TH 4:30–6:35 p.m.
Dustin Rutledge