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William F. Connell School of Nursing

Master’s Program Advanced Practice Nursing Specialties

william f. connell school of nursing

When you apply to a master’s program at the Boston College Connell School of Nursing, you choose one of six advanced practice specialties. The specialty component of your degree will prepare you for certification as a nurse practitioner (NP)—which focuses mainly on primary care—or certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA). In addition to master's degree programs, coursework and specialty certificates are offered in two non-degree specialties: Forensics and Palliative Care.

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Program Director Jane Flanagan talks about the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner specialty.


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Program Director Rosemary Byrne talks about the family nurse practitioner specialty.


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Anesthesia
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Program Director Sherri St. Pierre talks about the pediatric primary care nurse practitioner specialty.


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Program Director Pam Terreri talks about the psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner specialty.

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Program Director Holly Fontenot talks about the women’s health nurse practitioner specialty.

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Additional Specialty Electives

forensic nursing

Forensic nurses work with individual clients and families to provide consultation services, collect evidence from perpetrators and survivors of violent crime, and testify in court. They have the opportunity to advance forensic nursing science, develop policy, influence legislation, and collaborate with other health care, social services, and criminal justice system professionals to enhance the care of victims and perpetrators of violence.

palliative care

Palliative care nurses deliver innovative nursing interventions and treat health conditions with the goal of improving the quality of life for seriously ill patients and their families. Palliative care nurses choose a population-based concentration — adult, gerontological, pediatric, or community health nursing — and work in symptom-management clinics, home health and community agencies, long-term care facilities, acute care hospitals, and hospice settings.