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Kanstroom Hosts Brazilian Delegation

9/24/07--The Director of the Law School's International Human Rights Program hosted the delegation of visiting professors of law and social science, prosecutors, and human rights practitioners.

9/24/07--Professor Daniel Kanstroom, Director of the Law School's International Human Rights Program, hosted a delegation of visiting professors of law and social science, prosecutors, and human rights practitioners from Brazil on Monday, September 24th, 2007 at the Law School. "This visit confirms the increasing positive attention and respect that our human rights program is getting around the world," Kanstroom said.

The Brazilian group was traveling in the United States under the auspices of the Department of State's "International Visitor Leadership Program," sponsored by WorldBoston, a non-profit, non-partisan organization that seeks to educate the public about international affairs and facilitate international exchange for emerging leaders from around the world. Their goals were:

  • To gain an understanding of the teaching of human rights at major U.S. universities and law schools, including curriculum development, course structure, methodology and bibliography;

  • To understand successful U.S. models and experiences which could be adapted to programs in human rights that were recently established in Brazil; and

  • To establish contacts with U.S. peers that would facilitate the development of future university linkage programs.

Prof. Kanstroom, along with LL.M. Program Director Gail Hupper, and Post-Deportation Human Rights Project attorney, Rachel Rosenbloom, described human rights pedagogy, curriculum, and clinical programs at Boston College, as well as the new LL.M. program. The visitors were especially interested in learning about the multi-disciplinary work of the Center for Human Rights and International Justice, as well as BC's programs at The Hague and in Sarajevo.

"The visitors were deeply impressed BC law's commitment to social justice and to the merger of theory and practice in our human rights teaching," Kanstroom said, "and we were inspired by their work, as well. We hope that this is the beginning of many serious collaborations with our faculty and our students."