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Events

Collaborative Research Forum

FEBRUARY 18, 2015
12:00–1:00 p.m.
McGuinn 334
Please RSVP to Professor David Takeuchi at takeuchi@bc.edu

"How Neuroimaging Studies can Inform Educational Policy and Practice: The Case of Reading Disorder"

Boston College School of Social Work will kick off the spring semester's Collaborative Research Forum series with a talk by Professor Jessica Black about neuroimaging studies and how they relate to education. Lunch is provided.  More about the Collaborative Research Forum »

Macro-SIL Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series:
Chrismaldi Vasquez, Associate Director of Family Independence Initiative

JANUARY 23, 2015
11:50 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Faculty Dining Room, McElroy Commons
RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Limited to 10 students only. Please email Ian Witherby at witheria@bc.edu to reserve your spot.

The Macro-SIL Program at Boston College School of Social Work is sponsoring a Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series during the 2014-2015 academic year. The program is designed to introduce Macro-SIL students and other BC Social Work students interested in leadership skills to the practical experiences of leaders in social-justice-oriented careers. Leaders are invited to campus to bring their expertise in administration, policy, change management/transformation, and social innovation to the discussions. They are interviewed about their greatest leadership challenge, their most important leadership lesson, and advice for students. A facilitated Q&A session with students will follow each interview.

Chrismaldi Vasquez is Associate Director of Family Independence Initiative, Boston, which leverages the power of information to support economic and social mobility. FII is proving that documenting and investing in the initiative and ingenuity of low-income families and communities is the most effective way forward.  More about Macro-SIL Leadership Speakers Luncheon with Chrismaldi Vasquez »

News

GSSW in the News
Workplace Flexibility Gets Renewed Attention

Forbes Magazine

APRIL 2, 2014

Research on workplace flexibility by Professor Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes of the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work and by the Sloan Center on Aging and Work has recently been highlighted nationally.

Pitt-Catsouphes spoke with Forbes magazine about the struggles of Americans balancing work and the care of elderly parents. Family caregivers tend "to report higher work-family conflict, higher stress, and an increase in depressive symptoms—which is particularly true when you compare elder care versus childcare."

Flexible schedules are an option, but Pitt-Catsouphes said, "it's important that flexibility be viewed as a resource rather than a break—and that employees demonstrate to managers that they're approaching it as a way to maintain strong professional performance even while dealing with a family crisis."  More from Forbes »

In another recent article featured in the Boston College Chronicle, Pitt-Catsouphes noted that flexible work options are out of reach for most employees or are limited in size and scope. In a new study by the Sloan Center on Aging and Work, where Pitt-Catsouphes serves as director, she and her research collaborators examined the flexible work arrangements of 545 U.S. employers and found that only one in five companies offered more than one approach to workplace flexibility, despite the fact that different employees need different options.

The study, published in the journal Community, Work, and Family, found that employers and employees are better able to reap the benefits of workplace flexibility when the initiatives are comprehensive and well aligned with business priorities.

"What we're saying is flexibility can work if you make a commitment to making it work," Pitt-Catsouphes said. "Workplace flexibility is important to employees across the life course and can support the productive engagement of older employees as well as younger workers. In today's business environment, organizations need to be adaptive and nimble. Flexible work options offer tools that can help companies remain competitive."  More from the Boston College Chronicle »