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Boston College School of Social Work


BC Social Work Career Networking Event

November 12, 2015
6:00–7:30 p.m.
McGuinn 521
2 CEUs
Parking available in the Beacon Street Garage. See parking rates and information.

This fun annual event gives BC Social Work alumni and students a chance to explore careers and network with each other through informal conversation and a short panel discussion. Appetizers and beverages provided. Drop by for all or part of the evening.

Last year over 40 alumni and 100 students attended.

6:00-6:30 p.m. Networking
6:30-7:00 p.m. Panel discussion
7:00-7:30 p.m. Networking

Hosted by BC Social Work Alumni Association and Career Services.

Alumni: Please RSVP to by October 29.

Contact for more information.

Diversity + Justice Series Speaker
Michael Omi: Racial Formation and the Future of Racial Theory

November 9, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm
McGuinn Hall Auditorium (McGuinn 121)
Open to the entire BC Community

As part of the BCSSW Diversity + Justice Series events, BC Social Work will host a presentation with Dr. Michael Omi. Michael is a sociologist and associate professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society that brings together scholars, policy makers, and stakeholders to eliminate barriers to an inclusive, just, and sustainable society.

Michael is known for his collaboration with Howard Winant on the ground-breaking and classic book, Racial Formation in the United States, first published in 1986.  Michael will be speaking about the third edition of his book which has been substantially revised and recently released this year. The book is transformative with a cogent discussion and elaboration on the social construction and politics of race.  A major part of the racial formation theory is that the complex meanings of race are constantly shaped and reshaped by political struggles at the micro and macro levels.  The book helped change the scholarship about race in a number of fields including sociology, education, health, and the behavioral sciences.  Michael’s will discuss what’s “new” in the new edition, consider contemporary events through the lens of racial formation theory, and reflect on future trends in racial theory.

Co-Sponsors:  Boston College School of Social Work, African and African Diaspora Studies Program, Asian and Asian American Studies, Asian Pacific Islander Employees, Lynch School of Education, Department of Sociology and the BCSSW Center for Social Innovations as part of the City Awake Boston.


BC Perspectives
50th Anniversary of Civil Rights Act

Vincent D. Rougeau
BC Law School Dean Vincent D. Rougeau wrote about the legacy and ongoing challenges of the civil rights act.

JULY 10, 2014

"BC Perspectives" highlights some of the important issues being explored by the Boston College community that reflect the Graduate School of Social Work's commitment to social justice.

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act. While much has changed since 1964, our nation still has a multitude of uphill social battles in front of us, from eliminating ongoing racism, to finding a way to provide widespread access to quality healthcare, to caring for our aging population.

In a recent issue of America magazine, Boston College School of Law Dean Vincent D. Rougeau penned an article on the legacy and ongoing challenges of the civil rights act. It's a powerfully personal story of his own family's journey, where he recounts his grandfather's life in segregation as a migrant worker who was never assured of receiving his next paycheck. "As someone whose possibilities in life were transformed by the Civil Rights Act, I am deeply indebted to the men and women in the civil rights movement and in the government who had the courage and vision to make it a reality," he explains.

Yet, rather than resting on his own accomplishments and what it has meant for his family, Rougeau takes advantage of his platform to look ahead into the future, and "welcome an America that will no longer be cast in black and white."

Rougeau writes:

In many ways, the treatment of immigrants is emerging as a new civil rights issue, and it raises a number of concerns around exclusion, membership and participation in a democratic society that characterized the civil rights movement in the mid-20th century. These issues should have particular resonance for Catholics because our social teaching takes a very strong position in support of social inclusion for the poor and the stranger. As Congress devours resources of time and money to accomplish little of lasting value when it comes to immigration, their inaction and indifference should announce an opportunity for the rest of us to act in a way that honors the legacy of the Civil Rights Act.
More from America magazine »

At Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, we share Dean Vincent Rougeau's call to honor the Civil Rights Act by advocating for immigrants living at the margins of our society. In 2012, we established the Immigrant Integration Lab, a research center that seeks to understand the appropriate services and delivery systems that lead to full social, civic, and economic integration of the foreign born in the United States. The center is headed by Associate Professor Westy Egmont.

View video to learn more about the Immigrant Integration Lab at BC Social Work.

View video of a conversation hosted by BC Social Work between Dean Vincent Rougeau and Professor Emerita Elaine Pinderhughes about diversity in the workplace.