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Boston College School of Social Work


BC Social Work Career Networking Event

November 12, 2015
6:00–7:30 p.m.
McGuinn 521
2 CEUs
Parking available in the Beacon Street Garage. See parking rates and information.

This fun annual event gives BC Social Work alumni and students a chance to explore careers and network with each other through informal conversation and a short panel discussion. Appetizers and beverages provided. Drop by for all or part of the evening.

Last year over 40 alumni and 100 students attended.

6:00-6:30 p.m. Networking
6:30-7:00 p.m. Panel discussion
7:00-7:30 p.m. Networking

Hosted by BC Social Work Alumni Association and Career Services.

Alumni: Please RSVP to by October 29.

Contact for more information.

Diversity + Justice Series Speaker
Michael Omi: Racial Formation and the Future of Racial Theory

November 9, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm
McGuinn Hall Auditorium (McGuinn 121)
Open to the entire BC Community

As part of the BCSSW Diversity + Justice Series events, BC Social Work will host a presentation with Dr. Michael Omi. Michael is a sociologist and associate professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society that brings together scholars, policy makers, and stakeholders to eliminate barriers to an inclusive, just, and sustainable society.

Michael is known for his collaboration with Howard Winant on the ground-breaking and classic book, Racial Formation in the United States, first published in 1986.  Michael will be speaking about the third edition of his book which has been substantially revised and recently released this year. The book is transformative with a cogent discussion and elaboration on the social construction and politics of race.  A major part of the racial formation theory is that the complex meanings of race are constantly shaped and reshaped by political struggles at the micro and macro levels.  The book helped change the scholarship about race in a number of fields including sociology, education, health, and the behavioral sciences.  Michael’s will discuss what’s “new” in the new edition, consider contemporary events through the lens of racial formation theory, and reflect on future trends in racial theory.

Co-Sponsors:  Boston College School of Social Work, African and African Diaspora Studies Program, Asian and Asian American Studies, Asian Pacific Islander Employees, Lynch School of Education, Department of Sociology and the BCSSW Center for Social Innovations as part of the City Awake Boston.


Immigrant Integration Lab Co-Hosts Seminar on Supporting Immigrant Students

MAY 17, 2013

The Immigrant Integration Lab in the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work and the Center for Optimized Student Support in the Boston College Lynch School of Education co-hosted an event on May 10, 2013, that brought together experts from the fields of education and immigration.

Panelists spoke on the obstacles and opportunities facing immigrant children in the world of education. Among those on the panel was Westy Egmont, Director of the Immigrant Integration Lab. He addressed some of the issues with the new immigration reform bill in Congress, bringing attention to the fact that the 800-page document does not dedicate any support of immigrant education.

"If we assist the family, we see the difference between high and low success rates," Egmont stated. "When we address the whole person and create an affirming environment, we see remarkable success."

Usha Tumala-Narra, Counseling, Developmental and Educational Psychology Professor at Boston College, spoke on her research project studying the coping methods of 9th and 10th grade immigrant students in Massachusetts. Her study revealed common trends among students such as a strong sense of ethnic identity, a low likelihood of immigrant students to seek mental health services, and continuous encounters with discrimination.

As School Site Coordinator of City Connects, Nicole Robinson shared her experiences working with immigrant children and their families in the education system. She emphasized the importance of proper transitions for families whose children are bounced between English language immersion classrooms and the public school system. Care of students outside of class is impactful in closing the achievement gap.

Vera Johnson, Director of the Newcomer Assessment and Counseling Center in Boston, spoke about initiatives the center instituted to help foster English language learning among students and their parents. The center started teaching English for Speakers of Other Languages classes specifically geared towards parents in order for them to better assist their children in school, is training families on how to use technology at home, and is helping immigrant families find access to low cost computers and other technology.

Eric Dearing, Director of the Center for Optimized Student Support in the Boston College Lynch School of Education, organized the symposium as a link between City Connects and his evidence-based research that documents the role of out-of-school support in achieving successful academic goals.