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Boston College School of Social Work


In Quiet Desperation: Men's Mental Health and the Role of Social Work

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015
12:30–2:00 p.m.
McGuinn 521
RSVP to by 9/22
1.5 CEUs
Lunch Provided

Since 2011, Dr. Kevin Shafer has been an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He received his PhD from The Ohio State University in 2009. He has three research foci: (1) father involvement and its effects on men, women, and children; (2) gender differences in mental health and help-seeking; and (3) the influence of stepfather-child and father-child relationships on the stepchild’s well-being. Dr. Shafer conducts this research in both the United States and Brazil. He is the principal investigator of the Survey of Contemporary Fatherhood and the BYU Men's Studies Research Lab, a multidisciplinary research group addressing men's health, well-being, and fathering.

PhD Information Session Webinar

SEPTEMBER 22, 2015
12:00–1:00 p.m.

Boston College School of Social Work invites you to participate in an interactive PhD Information Session Webinar to learn about our PhD programs and ask questions. The program director and current Boston College PhD students will give an overview about the program. If you are interested in participating, please register for the 2015 Webinar »


GSSW in the News
Boston's Economic Mobility

JULY 25, 2013

A new study that maps economic mobility has shown when it comes to escaping poverty, where people live matters. While some Southern and Midwestern cities didn't fare well by the metrics used, residents of Northeastern cities such as Boston have an easier time moving up the ladder.

Boston still struggles with struggles areas of concentrated poverty, but Tiziana Dearing, Associate Professor of Macro Practice at Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, says the city has shifted in important ways.

"We are much better integrated, much more equal, much less overtly racist than we were 20 years ago — and than most of America thinks that we are now," Dearing says.

Read more from WBUR »