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GSSW in the News
Erika Sabbath Earns Major CDC Grant

SEPTEMBER 18, 2014

Assistant Professor Erika Sabbath, who recently joined Boston College School of Social Work, has been awarded a major grant for research into the economic and health effects of psychosocial workplace exposures.

According to a report in the Boston College Chronicle, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) grant is part of a program designed to support early-career scholars. Sabbath is the first BC Social Work professor to receive such a grant.  More about Erika Sabbath's grant award »

BC Social Work Launches Blog

SEPTEMBER 16, 2014

The Boston College School of Social Work proudly announces the launch of a new school blog: Innovate@BCSocialWork, an interactive space designed to serve those who are committed to social justice. While the blog will serve the students, alumni, and faculty of the school, it's intended for anyone seeking to engage in an intellectual forum about how to make transformation happen.

The goal of Innovate@BCSocialWork is to build a community of people who care about the study of social work in higher education, while highlighting social work practice and research taking place both within, and beyond, BC's campus walls.  More about BC Social Work Blog »

Events

Macro-SIL Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series:
Stephen Seiner, Director of Neurotherapeutics at McLean Hospital

Stephen Seiner

JANUARY 31, 2014
11:50 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Faculty Dining Room, McElroy Commons
RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Limited to 10 students only. Please email Chris Watt at christopher.watt@bc.edu to reserve your spot.

The Macro-SIL Program at Boston College Graduate School of Social Work is sponsoring a Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series during the 2013-2014 academic year. The program is designed to introduce Macro-SIL students and other BC Social Work students interested in leadership skills and to the practical experiences of leaders in social-justice-oriented careers. Leaders are invited to campus to bring their expertise in administration, policy, change management/transformation, and social innovation to the discussions. They are interviewed about their greatest leadership challenge, their most important leadership lesson, and advice for students. A facilitated Q&A session with students will follow each interview.

Stephen J. Seiner is the Director of Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics and a Geriatric Psychiatrist at McLean Hospital in Belmont, MA. Seiner joined McLean Hospital, named the #1 psychiatric hospital in the U.S. by U.S. News and World Report, as a resident in the Harvard University program in 1994. His sub-speciality is geriatric psychiatry. During his career at McLean, Seiner has held a number of roles, such as Chief Resident of the Clinical Evaluation Center, Clinical Director of the Outpatient Geriatric Clinic, and primary supervisor for the McLean/Massachusetts General Hospital psychiatry residency program.

For nearly a decade, Seiner has led the Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program at McLean Hospital. The Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program (PNP) specializes in the neuromodulatory and neurostimulatory treatment of psychiatric disorders. It offers transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a new therapy for treating severe depression, as well as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), an effective conventional therapy for chronic depression, mania, catatonia, and schizophrenia. TMS and ECT are the first in a line of clinical neurotherapeutic services to be offered through the program. In addition, Seiner speaks regularly on subjects such as depression and heart disease, the link between dementia and depression, and treatment-resistant depression. He has published a number of scholarly papers and book chapters.

Seiner has an MD from Washington University in St. Louis and a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan.

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Limited to 10 students only. Please email Chris Watt at christopher.watt@bc.edu to reserve your spot.