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Boston College Graduate School of Social Work
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News

Q & A with Margaret Lombe, Associate Professor, Global Practice and Older Adults & Families

OCTOBER 30, 2014

"For us as social workers, even those of us who might be working in a localized setting, we must realize that there are problems that we face that might appear to be isolated, but that in fact impact others living in communities across the world."

Margaret Lombe, PhD, arrived on the campus of the Boston College School of Social Work ten years ago this fall. Since then, she has developed a reputation as a leading researcher on poverty, food security, and social inclusion/exclusion. She has conducted evaluations for Non-Governmental Organizations such as Catholic Relief Services, OXFAM America, and Global Ignatian Advocacy Networks, and she serves as an ongoing consultant to the United Nations. But despite all of her success in the fields of research and international social development, it is her role as an educator and a mentor to a future generation of social workers that she says is her most cherished work.

In a recent conversation, Lombe discusses what the past ten years have meant to her, the imperative of training "globally-minded" social workers, and her latest research project on food security.  More Q & A with Margaret Lombe »

GSSW in the News
Dean Alberto Godenzi Counsels NFL on Domestic Violence

OCTOBER 24, 2014

Dean Alberto Godenzi from the Boston College School of Social Work proposed a suggestion for how the National Football League (NFL) can take an "unequivocal stance on domestic violence" in an op-ed for the Boston Globe.

Godenzi suggests that the league should ask team captains to read a statement against domestic violence and sexual abuse prior to the kickoff of games. It's an idea Godenzi borrows from the playbook of soccer's major governing body, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), who launched an anti-racism campaign in response to repeated acts of intolerance from players, fans, and management.  More from the blog Innovate@BCSocialWork »

Events

Macro-SIL Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series:
Stephen Seiner, Director of Neurotherapeutics at McLean Hospital

Stephen Seiner

JANUARY 31, 2014
11:50 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Faculty Dining Room, McElroy Commons
RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Limited to 10 students only. Please email Chris Watt at christopher.watt@bc.edu to reserve your spot.

The Macro-SIL Program at Boston College Graduate School of Social Work is sponsoring a Leadership Speakers Luncheon Series during the 2013-2014 academic year. The program is designed to introduce Macro-SIL students and other BC Social Work students interested in leadership skills and to the practical experiences of leaders in social-justice-oriented careers. Leaders are invited to campus to bring their expertise in administration, policy, change management/transformation, and social innovation to the discussions. They are interviewed about their greatest leadership challenge, their most important leadership lesson, and advice for students. A facilitated Q&A session with students will follow each interview.

Stephen J. Seiner is the Director of Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics and a Geriatric Psychiatrist at McLean Hospital in Belmont, MA. Seiner joined McLean Hospital, named the #1 psychiatric hospital in the U.S. by U.S. News and World Report, as a resident in the Harvard University program in 1994. His sub-speciality is geriatric psychiatry. During his career at McLean, Seiner has held a number of roles, such as Chief Resident of the Clinical Evaluation Center, Clinical Director of the Outpatient Geriatric Clinic, and primary supervisor for the McLean/Massachusetts General Hospital psychiatry residency program.

For nearly a decade, Seiner has led the Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program at McLean Hospital. The Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program (PNP) specializes in the neuromodulatory and neurostimulatory treatment of psychiatric disorders. It offers transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a new therapy for treating severe depression, as well as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), an effective conventional therapy for chronic depression, mania, catatonia, and schizophrenia. TMS and ECT are the first in a line of clinical neurotherapeutic services to be offered through the program. In addition, Seiner speaks regularly on subjects such as depression and heart disease, the link between dementia and depression, and treatment-resistant depression. He has published a number of scholarly papers and book chapters.

Seiner has an MD from Washington University in St. Louis and a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan.

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Limited to 10 students only. Please email Chris Watt at christopher.watt@bc.edu to reserve your spot.