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Ashley Hammonds, MSW '11

Taking Pride in Her Culture

As a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, Ashley Hammonds, MSW '11, takes pride in her culture and in helping to create awareness about the lives of modern day Native Americans.  more »

Professor and Louise McMahon Ahearn Chair James Lubben

'I'm a Dreamer'

Professor and Louise McMahon Ahearn Chair James Lubben talks about his love of flowers and how cultivation and nurturing translates to his teaching and relationships with his students.  more »

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Fall 2013

Workshop A: Yoga for Trauma Survivors

Thursday, October 24, 2013
1:30–4:15 p.m.
Barat House, Newton Campus
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Alison M. Rhodes, Ph.D., Adjunct Faculty, Boston College GSSW

Over the past several years the Trauma Center for Justice Resource Institute has developed a regular yoga program from traumatized individuals ("Trauma Sensitive Yoga"). In addition the Center has carried out one of the first major scientific studies showing that yoga can significantly improve trauma symptoms. In this half-day training you will learn about (and have the opportunity to practice) some elements of Trauma Sensitive Yoga. We will review the impact of traumatic stress on survivors' minds and bodies as well as the rationale and research evidence for yoga as a treatment modality for traumatic stress. We will discuss the ways in which yoga can be integrated into clinical treatment and also used as a tool for the clinician's own self care.

Workshop B: Unplug, Re-charge and Re-connect: Using Yoga and Meditation to Combat Compassion Fatigue

Thursday, October 31, 2013
10:00 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House, Newton Campus
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Sheri Breen, BA, RYT - Eliot Community Human Services

Many of us who are caretakers often struggle with issues of compassion fatigue due to excessive demands of the work. Yoga and meditation have increasingly been shown to combat stress, anxiety, and depression as well as related experiences associated with compassion fatigue. In this experiential workshop we will first discuss research findings that support the use of yoga and meditation for relief from compassion fatigue. We will also invite participants to identify their personal burnout patterns in their professional lives so we can identify the specific yoga and meditation practices that may be beneficial to the rejuvenation process and also proactively ward off compassion fatigue in the future. During the latter part of the workshop you'll also have the opportunity to briefly experience some the these relevant practices if you wish. Please dress in comfortable clothes.

Workshop C: Effective Approaches in Serving Substance Using Clients

Thursday, October 31, 2013
1:30–5:15 p.m.
Barat House, Newton Campus
$45.00
4.25 CEUs
Instructor: Brendan Clarke, LMHC - Eliot Community Services

This training addresses the challenges of working with substance using and dual diagnosis persons from a person-centered, strengths-based perspective. It will focus on the various tools of engagement that are useful with ambivalent clients (with an emphasis on motivational interviewing). We also will address relapse issues, recognizing and "rolling with" resistance, maintaining personal boundaries, managing client and practitioner safety, stage-of-change treatment planning, and knowledge of treatment options and resources (including abstinence and harm-reduction models).

Workshop D: An Introduction to DSM 5

Friday, November 22, 2013
9:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House, Newton Campus
$40.00
3.75 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., Eliot Community Human Services

In May 2013 the 5th Edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistic Manual was released. This diagnostic nomenclature is significantly different in many ways from DSM IV. It embodies the first substantial change to psychiatric diagnosis in over thirty years. This workshop will provide an overview of the structural changes to the new Manual. We will address some of the remaining thorny issues to be grappled with as this new Manual is introduced. We will also discuss what diagnoses were added and deleted... and why. We will also discuss several modifications to existing recognized diagnoses. This information is critical for clinical social workers to possess in order to practice competently now and in the years to come.

Workshop E: Social Work Supervision in Today's Changing Workplace–Let's Refer Back to the Classics

Friday, November 22, 2013
1:30–4:45 p.m.
Barat House, Newton Campus
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Susan A. Coleman, LICSW, Director, Field Education - Boston College GSSW

Social workers are employed in a multitude of settings, each of which may have varying beliefs regarding the nature and importance of staff and student supervision. This workshop provides the opportunity for the supervisory social worker to step back and examine key elements of practice and supervision today by looking at some selected relevant themes in classic literary works. Some of these works include: The Color Purple, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and The House on Mango Street. We will see how these themes from the classics can provide new insights into social work practice and supervision today. Further, we will identify a set of best practices regarding supervision as well as what structures need to be built into an effective supervisory relationship. We'll also provide several usable tips you can implement right away in your supervisory work.

 

Summer 2013

Workshop A: Trauma Informed Care

Wednesday, June 5, 2013
9:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$45.00
4.00 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., Eliot Community Human Services

Upwards of 90% of adults who receive mental health care in public programs have experienced significant trauma in their lives. Many have bona fide symptoms of PTSD. This training will raise awareness of PTSD and also try to help clinicians develop more compassion around the behaviors associated with trauma that are so often pathologized. Since clinicians also are involved more and more in crisis issues, a more nuanced understanding of triggers and how to suggest/implement coping skills will be discussed.

Workshop B: Introduction to Motivational Interviewing

Wednesday, June 5, 2013
1:30–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$45.00
4.00 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., Eliot Community Human Services

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically validated approach to working with individuals who have a wide range of problems that often involve the need for behavior change. This workshop is intended to give clinicians a "taste" for this approach. We will discuss the basic concepts and methods of MI. We also will look at the concept of "treatment resistance" through an MI lens. The trainer is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers.

Workshop C: Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) Current Approaches

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop will be offered in two segments (June 6 & 13). You must register for both segments.

Thursday, June 6, 2013 and Thursday, June 13, 2013
1:30–5:00 p.m. each day
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$90.00
8.00 CEUs
Instructor: Kerry Mitchell, LICSW, Ph.D., Faculty—Boston College Graduate School of Social Work

The first segment will focus on the meditational model underlying CBT and the processes that produce maladaptation, including cognitive distortions and intermediate beliefs. Case examples and a video will be presented. The second segment will focus on cognitive schemas, their origins and maintenance. Also, some discussion of CBT within family systems and psychodynamic therapy will be presented. Vignettes and a full schema-focused session will be presented.

Workshop D: The Overscheduled Life as a Therapeutic Issue

Friday, June 7, 2013
9:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$45.00
4.00 CEUs
Instructor: Abby Seixas, M.Ed., LMHC, Founder—Deep River Seminars

We live in a "time-starved" society. How can we create conditions for ourselves and our clients that invite renewal, calm, and balance in daily life? This workshop will present tools that can help us get closer to deeper feelings, creative possibilities, and spiritual sustenance in daily life. We will also address the disconnection from self that can negatively influence relationships with partners, children, coworkers, and others. We will focus on information from the instructor's book, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman's Guide to Recovering Balance and Meaning in Everyday Life (Jossey-Bass, 2007). We will learn six new core practices for recovering balance and meaning in daily life as well as strategies to heal the healer.

Workshop E: An Introduction to DSM 5

Friday, June 7, 2013
1:15–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$50.00
4.25 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., Eliot Community Human Services

In May 2013 the 5th Edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistic Manual will be released. This diagnostic nomenclature is significantly different from DSM IV. It embodies the first substantial change to psychiatric diagnosis in over thirty years. This workshop focuses on the structural changes of the manual. We will address what diagnoses were deleted (and why). We will present details on new additions to the manual and will discuss significant modifications to existing diagnoses. This information is critical for all clinical social workers to possess in order to practice effectively now and in the years to come.

Workshop F: Introduction to Social Work with the Military

Thursday, June 13, 2013
9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$40.00
3.25 CEUs
Instructor: Joan Beder, DSW, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Yeshiva University, New York, NY

This workshop will introduce participants to various aspects of social work with the military. We will start with an introduction to the military culture and how that impacts the service member and family members. We then will discuss various psychosocial issues involved in deployment of the service member and then address issues related to reintegration after service. Case examples and intervention strategies for social workers will be provided.

Workshop G: Inside the World of Those Who Self-injure

Friday, June 14, 2013
1:30–4:15 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$40.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Lynn Huber, MSW, MA, LICSW, North Shore Counseling Center

You discover one of your clients is self-injuring...what you do next involves many decision making processes. Is the person safe, what motivated the action, liability issues, etc. are among the things the clinician ponders. This workshop offers a look at the world of those who self-injure and provides techniques to offer your clients to use in modifying their behavior while maintaining therapeutic rapport. This perspective is offered by a presenter who was intimately involved in the 1990s when the first public glimpses of those who self-injure became visible. The presenter has a practice that welcomes the chance to assist those whose emotional pain results in physical pain as well. Case illustrations will be presented.

Workshop H: Hearing Voices That Are Distressing

Wednesday, June 19, 2013
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$25.00
2.25 CEUs
Instructor: Sheri Breen, BA, RYT, Eliot Community Human Services

The curriculum for this workshop is based on Pat Deegan's "Hearing Voices" work and gives participants the opportunity to experience how hearing voices can impact someone in their daily life. It is an experiential training. We will discuss the concept of "hearing voices" then listen to voices using an MP3 player while engaging in a variety of activities. We will then debrief, identify common themes, and discuss how we can better help clients in our practice who hear voices in their daily lives.

Workshop I: Unplug, Recharge and Reconnect: Using Yoga and Meditation to Combat Compassion Fatigue

Wednesday, June 19, 2013
1:30–4:15 p.m.
McGuinn Hall Room 334
$40.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Sheri Breen, BA, RYT, Eliot Community Human Services

Many of us who are caretakers struggle with issues of compassion fatigue due to the excessive demands of this work. Yoga and meditation have been shown to combat stress, anxiety, depression, and other related experiences that are related to compassion fatigue. This experiential workshop invites participants to identify their personal burnout patterns so we can identifiy the specific yoga and meditation practices that may be beneficial to the rejuvenation process and also proactively ward off compassion fatigue. We invite attendees to dress in comfortable clothing for this session.

Workshop J: Advancing the Skills of Motivational Interviewing

This workshop is available one of two dates:
Friday, June 21, 2013 or Wednesday, June 26, 2013
9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$90.00
8.00 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., CPRP—Eliot Community Human Services

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative, goal-orientated method of communication that pays particular attention to the language of change. Its aim is to strengthen personal motivation and commitment to a change goal by eliciting and exploring an individual's own arguments (pro and con) for change. The workshop is designed to assist participants in advancing basic MI skills that have been learned from prior training or experience. We will address "OARS" skill-building (Open-ended questions, Affirm, Reflective listening, Summarize), "rolling with the resistance" and recognizing/evoking/utilizing change talk towards committing to an action through exercises, role-plays, discussion, and demonstration. This workshop is for practitioners who have had some prior experience with MI and is NOT intended to be an introductory session. The trainer is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers.

Enrollment will be limited to 20 participants each session. Register early!

Workshop K: Special Education Advocacy in Schools

Wednesday, June 26, 2013
1:30–4:15 p.m.
McGuinn Hall Room 029
$40.00
3.0 CEUs
Instructor: Sivon Irvings, MBA, LCSW, Boston Education Consultants

This workshop will provide an introduction to family rights and responsibilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Massachusetts Special Education Law and the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) initiative. This information can help social workers be more effective partners with parents who are pursuing their child's eligibility for special education. Education advocates trained by the Federation for Children with Special Needs will present recent case studies and lead small group discussions. Participants will receive the most recent information on Special Education Advocacy in schools as well as information on a network of relevant organizations.

Workshop L: An Overview of Psychopharmacology

Friday, June 28, 2013
1:30–4:15 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium
$40.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Rich Carey, RN, FNP-BC, Eliot Community Human Services

Clinicians who work in an interdisciplinary fashion need to have an understanding of the nature and function of psychotropic medications. This workshop will provide an overview of the various types of medications available, when they are indicated and when they are not. A discussion of how prescribers try to minimize adverse side effects will also be provided. The trainer will discuss cases that illustrate the issues above and participants are invited to share relevant clinical examples from their practice.

 

Fall 2012

Session A: The Concept of Coaching

Thursday, September 6, 2012
10:00 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Stefan Battle, Ed.D., MSW—Family and Friends Coaching Practice

Coaching is a partnership between the coach and the person receiving services. It differs from therapy since the coach is more of a "facilitator, educator and mentor" than is the therapist who tends to be more of a "fixer." We will examine the similarities and differences between the model for coaching and the general model for therapy. We will also examine specific methods for interacting with clients that utilize coaching principles and what types of problems/issues lend themselves to a coaching approach. Case examples will be provided that illustrate many similarities and differences between therapy and coaching.

Session B: Introduction to the Family System and Differential Parenting

Thursday, September 13, 2012
10:00 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Stefan Battle, Ed.D., MSW—Family and Friends Coaching Practice

The nuclear family system is comprised of behavioral patterns that create complex and enduring themes, trends and expectations among and between family members through which they need to navigate. Regardless of how families are uniquely constructed the systems concept applies to all families. We will: 1) provide an overview of the family systems model and discuss its implications for parenting skills; 2) develop an awareness of this concept through self-examination of one's own family unit; 3) discuss what we mean by "differential parenting skills" and relate it to the family systems model and 4) share challenging family therapy experiences from which we can learn.

Sessions C: Engaging the Angry Client

Friday, September 14, 2012
10:00 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Joseph Pereira, LICSW, CAS and Kristin Osborn, MA, LMHC DBA Outlook Associates of New England

Anger is an emotional state that can range from mild irritation to murderous rage. Cognitive-behavioral strategies provide an important component to treatment of individuals who are experiencing difficulties with anger regulation...yet these techniques are often insufficient alone. Participants will learn effective cognitive-behavioral strategies that can be used in the treatment of anger management coupled with the approach known as "affect phobia treatment." Affect phobia treatment is a way to assist the client to gradually become aware of (and desensitized to) strong fears associated with anger as an emotional state. Several case examples will be presented. Participants are also invited to discuss material from their own practice that demonstrates the various types of problems clients have with anger.

Session D: A Comparative Analysis of the Family Systems Theories of Murray Bowen and Viginia Satir

Thursday, September 20, 2012
10:00 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
Barat House
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Stefan Battle, Ed.D., MSW—Family and Friends Coaching Practice

The contributions of these two giants in family therapy will be explored in this session. Bowen views the family as an emotional unit whose members can be affected powerfully by other members' thoughts, feelings and actions, often causing difficulties with issues of closeness, distance and boundaries. Satir's ideas are similar but she offers more insights into how family dynamics can often create situations where healthy intentions get lost amidst unhealthy encounters among and between family members. We will spend some time on the self-examination of one's own family of origin as related to these issues. We also will examine the ways in which both theories can be useful in working with families, especially as they pertain to parenting skills.

Session E: Reports from the Field: A Day-Long Celebration of BC Contributions to Social Work Practice Today

Saturday, September 22, 2012
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
McGuinn 121
Regular Fee $70.00; Presenter’s Fee $50.00
6.75 CEUs

This special conference is organized "by-and-for" Boston College Graduate School of Social Work alumni and friends to discuss and celebrate the innovative work we are doing in the field. It is sponsored by the BCGSSW Alumni Association and its Office of Continuing Education. The instructors are largely BCGSSW alums; one is a BCGSSW doctoral candidate. Please email joy.velarde@bc.edu if you wish a summary of the content for each of the presentations below. A sampling of the presentations to be offered includes:

  • Dealing With Conflict Effectively: Tools for the Social Worker of Tomorrow—Gail Packer, MSW '77
  • Peer Support in a Homeless Transitional Residence for Veterans— Corona Benson, MSW '07
  • Conducting a Suicide Risk Assessment—Kimberly O’Brien, MSW '05 and Ph.D. '11
  • Social Work in Human Resource Practices: A Value-Added Benefit—Catie Maillard, MSW '11
  • Making Groups a Part of Your Practice—Theresa Bullock Cohen, MSW '03
  • Substance Abuse Treatment in a Jail Diversion Context: Speak Motivationally and Let the Court Carry the Big Stick—Mary Bettley, MSW '90
  • Leadership Styles for Preventing, Identifying and Resolving Workplace Conflict—Dylan Dalton, MSW '88 with Charley Matera
  • What is Mediation...and Why Is It Something Social Workers Should Know About?—Ben Stich, MSW '01
  • Modern Shamanism in Contemporary Practice: The Art of Making Whole—Louise Dery-Wells, MSW '88
  • Police and Social Work: Youth Violence Prevention Strategies— Andrea Perry, MSW '99 and Rosemary Kanaan, MSW '07
  • Multi-state Survey of Support Brokers in 'Participant-directed Services': Roles and Training Needs—Haesang Jeon, Ph.D. Candidate (BCGSSW) with Kevin Mahoney, Dawn M. Loughlin, Lori Simon-Rusinowitz

Session F: The Extended and Surrogate Family System

Thursday, September 27, 2012
10:00-12:45 p.m.
Barat House
$35.00
3.00 CEUs
Instructor: Stefan Battle, Ed.D., MSW—Family and Friends Coaching Practice

Extended and surrogate family structures that exist for a family enable the child to grow up in a more nurturing environment thereby embodying the proverb, "It Takes a Village to Raise a Child." In this workshop we will examine how social workers can expand their thinking about family support beyond just the nuclear family system. We will: 1) explore how extended and/or surrogate family members can be identified and utilized effectively by parents and children and 2) spend some time exploring this issue in our own personal life history discussing the roles extended and surrogate family members have played in our own lives.

Session G: Advanced Skills in the Practice of Motivational Interviewing

Friday, September 28, 2012
10:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m
Barat House
$65.00
6.25 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, Psy.D., CPRP—Eliot Community Human Services

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative, goal-oriented method of communication that pays particular attention to the language of change. Its aim is to strengthen personal motivation and commitment to a change goal by eliciting and exploring an individual’s own arguments (pro and con) for change. The workshop is designed to assist participants in advancing basic MI skills that have been learned from prior training or experience. We will address "OARS" skill-building (Open-ended questions, Affirm, Reflective listening, Summarize), "rolling with the resistance" and recognizing/evoking/utilizing change talk towards committing to an action through exercises, role-plays, discussion and demonstration. This workshop is for practitioners who have had some prior experience with MI and is NOT intended to be an introductory session. The trainer is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers. Enrollment will be limited to 25 participants. Register early!

Summer 2014

Session A: Clinical Treatment of Men: Mission (Im)possible?

Thursday, June 12, 2014
9:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$50.00
3.0 CEUs
Instructors: Dennis Balcom, LICSW & Joe Pereira, LICSW, CAS, Outlook Associates of New England, Arlington, MA

Men's difficulties continue to trouble American society across the diverse range of masculinities, ethnicities and at all socioeconomic levels. This workshop will incorporate concepts from gender socialization, attachment and male development. It will also describe effective treatment methods that are responsive to men's concerns and psychological experiences. Providing treatment that takes into consideration the specific needs of men can also improve men's willingness to access treatment.

Session B: Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT): Current Approaches

Thursday, June 12 & Thursday, June 19, 2014
1:30–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$110.00
8.0 CEUs
Instructor: Kerry Mitchell, LICSW, PhD, Faculty, BC Social Work

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop will be offered in two segments (June 12 and 19). You must register for both segments. The first segment will focus on the mediational model underlying CBT and the processes that produce maladaptation, including cognitive distortions and intermediate beliefs. Case examples and a video will be presented. The second segment will focus on cognitive schemas, their origins and maintenance. Also, some discussion of CBT within family systems and psychodynamic therapy will be presented. Vignettes and a full schema-focused session will be presented.

Session C: Interventions and Skills of Trauma Informed Care

Friday, June 13, 2014
9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$100.00
7.5 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, PsyD, Eliot Community Human Services

Individuals respond to trauma based on a number of factors including the psychological, emotional, sociocultural, spiritual and familial. This training provides evidence-based theory and skills based on the Triphasic Trauma Theory model which will give clinicians a variety of key interventions to employ in the treatment of traumatic stress, grief and loss. We will focus largely on this type of clinical work as applicable to work with various adult populations.

Session D: Understanding Trauma in Children, Youth and Families

Wednesday, June 18, 2014
1:00–4:15 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$55.00
3.6 CEUs
Instructors: Rachel Tuckman, LICSW & Zane Fitzgerald, LICSW, Eliot Community Human Services

This training will provide an overview of traumatic stress on children, youth and families. It will provide, as well, an overview of trauma informed care in the context of child, youth and family service systems. We will also address the issue of vicarious traumatization and the importance of self-care for human service professionals. Practical examples, case studies, group activities and audio/video clips will be utilized. Active participation of attendees will be strongly encouraged.

Session E: The Overscheduled Life as a Therapeutic Issue

Thursday, June 19, 2014
9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$55.00
3.25 CEUs
Instructor: Abby Seixas, MEd, LMHC Founder, Deep River Seminars

We live in a "time-starved" society. How can we create conditions for ourselves and clients that invite renewal, calm and balance in daily life? This workshop will present tools that can help us get closer to deeper feelings, creative possibilities and spiritual sustenance in daily life. We will also address the disconnection from self that can negatively influence relationships with partners, children, coworkers and others. We will focus on information from the instructor's book, Finding the Deep River Within: A Woman's Guide to Recovering Balance and Meaning in Everyday Life (Jossey-Bass, 2007). We will learn six core practices for recovering balance and meaning in daily life as well as strategies to heal the healer.

Session F: Advancing the Skills of Motivational Interviewing

Friday, June 20, 2014
9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$110.00
7.55 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, PsyD, Eliot Community Human Services

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative goal-oriented method of communication with particular attention to the language of change. Its aim is to strengthen personal motivation for, and commitment to, a change goal by exploring an individual's own arguments around the meaning of change. This training is designed for those with an existing basic understanding of MI. We will build on your existing skills in OARS and rolling with resistance. We will conduct exercises and role-play.

Session G: Trauma Informed Care Interventions for Children, Youth and Families

Thursday, June 26, 2014
1:00–4:15 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$55.00
3.6 CEUs
Instructors: Rachel Tuckman, LICSW & Zane Fitzgerald, LICSW, Eliot Community Human Services

In this training we will provide an overview of several specific trauma informed interventions tailored for serving children, youth and families. Participants will learn how to do a trauma screening, assessment and evaluation and will learn how to access several specific practice tools. Several well-regarded treatment modalities for these client populations will be reviewed. They include: Attachment Self-Regulation (ARC), Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT) and Child/Parent Psychotherapy (CPP). The importance for therapist self-care when doing this kind of work will also be addressed.

Session H: What Should Social Service Professionals Know About the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Subsidized Health Insurance in Massachusetts?

Friday, June 27, 2014
9:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$50.00
3.0 CEUs
Instructor: Frederick A. Duah, PhD (cand.), Network Health

One way the ACA seeks to reduce the number of uninsured Americans is by expanding Medicaid eligibility. In Massachusetts ACA implementation will eliminate some existing MassHealth and Connector programs and create new benefit plans, requiring a significant portion of MassHealth and Connector members to be realigned with the state's various subsidized health insurance programs. For social service providers it is important to understand how clients can continue to access critically needed services amidst this reorganization. We will provide: 1) an overview of changes to Massachusetts' subsidized health insurance market; 2) how ACA redefines eligibility for these programs; and 3) the types and costs of services available to eligible members.

Session I:An Introduction to DSM 5

Friday, June 27, 2014
1:30–4:15 p.m.
Cushing Hall Auditorium, Chestnut Hill Campus
$50.00
3.0 CEUs
Instructor: Greg Plante, PsyD, Eliot Community Human Services

In May 2013 the 5th Edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual was released. It embodies the first substantial change to psychiatric diagnosis in over thirty years. This workshop focuses on the structural changes of the manual. We will address what diagnoses were deleted (and why), with special focus on adult diagnoses. We will present details on new additions to the manual and will discuss significant modifications to existing diagnoses. We will describe how these changes represent changes from diagnoses in DSM IV-TR. This information is critical for all clinical social workers to possess in order to practice effectively now and in the years to come.