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Boston College School of Social Work
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Gautam Yadama

Gautam Yadama

Dean, Boston College School of Social Work
Professor, Global Practice

Gautam Yadama, PhD, is Dean and Professor at Boston College School of Social Work (BCSSW). Dean Yadama joined Boston College in 2016 as the ninth dean of the School of Social Work. Prior to working at Boston College, he served as Professor and Assistant Vice Chancellor for International Affairs-India at Washington University in St. Louis, MO.

Dean Yadama’s work focuses on understanding the social, environmental, and health challenges of rural poor in the regions of South Asia, Central Asia, and China. A significant thrust of his work is concerned with understanding and intervening in resource poor communities to improve social, health, economic, livelihood, and quality of life outcomes. Yadama’s research in India focuses on understanding the livelihoods of rural poor and ensuing strategies to achieve sustainability in their livelihoods. He is conducting a randomized control trial to study sustainability of new and efficient stove technologies in rural India to improve respiratory health and wellbeing of women and children.

He is also collaborating with Center for Economic and Social Studies and UNICEF in India to leverage system science and dissemination and implementation science for understanding child and maternal undernutrition. Another study examines community engagement in the governance of health services in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan and is funded by the Aga Khan Foundation. His research in China is directed at understanding the way rural communities in China engage in collective action and collaborate with the state in the supply and maintenance of quasi-public goods such as rural schools, health clinics, sanitation, and rural infrastructure. 

His book – Fires, Fuel & the Fate of 3 Billion: State of the Energy Impoverished (Oxford University Press) outlines an argument for transdisciplinary research to tackle complex problems at the intersections of poverty, environment, and health.