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Carroll Connection

September 2016

 


GRADUATE EDITION


Dean Andy Boynton

A MESSAGE FROM DEAN ANDY BOYNTON


Welcome to the premier issue of the Carroll Connection: Graduate Edition. We launched the Carroll Connection earlier this year with stories about life at the Carroll School and the ideas flowing among faculty, alumni, students, and others. Now we are introducing a twice-yearly edition geared specifically to you—alumni of the Carroll School of Management Graduate Programs. Read Andy’s message »

 


The Management Game

DNA of Business Group Work

“We’ve maxed out on debt,” says one participant in an executive team meeting. Meanwhile, in a conference room nearby, a team member for another multinational company is voicing concern: “Our competition is racing to the bottom on price.” Welcome to the world of management simulations as experienced by M.B.A. students at the Carroll School.
 


Alumni Spotlight: Monica Chandra, M.B.A.’88

12-Edited

In this space, the Carroll Connection’s graduate edition will feature prominent alumni and their responses to a common set of questions. The inaugural column turns the spotlight on Monica Chandra, M.B.A. ’88. She speaks here about her passions (such as eradicating cancer), her pastimes (which include listening to Bollywood music), and how to think “fast and slow” at the same time.

Rankings

FINDINGS


CORPORATE CULTURE: THE ENEMY WITHIN

A new study coauthored by information systems professor Gerald Kane is throwing corporate light on cartoonist Walt Kelly’s famous phrase: “We have met the enemy, and he is us.” Very often, a company’s worst enemy “isn’t an external market threat; it’s the company itself and its lack of motivation or wherewithal to adapt to digital trends,” CIO Journal, a publication of the Wall Street Journal.

Q&A: BULLISH BUT NOT SAYING SO

A working paper floated by Professor Ronnie Sadka (Finance) and three colleagues made headlines this past summer, including this one from CBS MoneyWatch—“Do CEOs lie? Perhaps, but not how you think.” The team found that CEOs often downplay good news about recent earnings and forecasts. Why? One possible answer is unsettling, as discussed by Sadka in a Q&A with the Carroll Connection.

NECESSARY EVILS

Most of us carry out emotionally difficult tasks at work, but what happens to us after years of doing so? What kind of coping mechanisms do we develop? Professor Judy Clair (Management and Organization), along with two colleagues who received their doctorates from the Carroll School, write for the Harvard Business Review online about their findings published in the Journal of Management Inquiry.


CONNECTIONS


IN OMAHA, SITTING AT THE FEET OF THE ORACLE

The 20 Carroll School M.B.A. students knew they’d learn something about investing when they touched down in Omaha last month. How could they not? They were slated to spend the next morning with Warren Buffett, the billionaire investor, who’s based there. But as they interacted with the Oracle of Omaha, the lessons they heard surprised them.

MAKING WAY FOR THE ACCOUNTING DOCTORS

“When you look at our peer schools, almost all of them have doctoral programs in accounting,” notes professor and accounting chair Mark Bradshaw, referring to such institutions as Duke and the University of Pennsylvania. Now the Carroll School is getting ready to launch Boston College’s Ph.D. program in accounting.

A 7TH INNING STRETCH FOR REAL ESTATE?

John Maher, M.B.A. ’08 and U.S. mortgage director at Sun Life Financial, took his place among a raft of Boston College alumni who gave pointed advice to undergraduate students at a forum last month titled “Launching Your Real Estate Career.” The event began with an assessment that the current real estate cycle is in its “6th or 7th inning.”

FROM COMBAT TO THE CLASSROOM

Ralph Cacciapaglia, M.B.A. ’15, was among those featured in a published profile of veterans who have made a quick and solid transition from the military to civilian life. Here, the former U.S. Army Ranger and Purple Heart recipient speaks of success after service.