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October 2017
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Leading with Ideas

 

STAGECRAFT: THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION 

By Andy Boynton, John and Linda Powers Family Dean

This fall has brought scenes of airboat water rescues and pop-up hospitals—illustrating not only the suffering caused by this season's hurricanes but also the pivotal roles played by first responders. Their work will be evolving rapidly as new technologies—for example, driverless ambulances—surface in the coming decade. What does all that have to do with management in general, not to mention higher education? A lot, as I suggested recently in an article for Harvard Business Review.

 

READ MORE FROM DEAN ANDY BOYNTON »

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Top stories

 

MEET OUR NEW FACULTY

The Carroll School welcomed nine new faculty members for the 2017–18 academic year. They bring a variety of talents and research interests that promise to enrich our community.

 

SLIDESHOW OF NEW FACULTY »

 

 

RANSBOTHAM HELMS MIT REPORT ON AI

Associate Professor Sam Ransbotham of the Information Systems Department served as guest editor and co-author of the MIT Sloan Management Review’s research report “Artificial Intelligence and Business Strategy,” released in September. The report included a broad survey of business executives around the globe along with context provided by some of Ransbotham's own articles on the topic. Ransbotham, the McKiernan Family Faculty Fellow, also co-authored the Sloan report on big data, “Analytics as a Source of Business Innovation.”

 

JOURNAL OF JESUIT BUSINESS EDUCATION FEATURES PORTICO PROGRAM

The Carroll School’s Portico program—a course for all first-year students that connects ethics with the practical challenges of contemporary business—was the focus of “Portico: An Introduction to Business as an Ethical Practice” in the current edition of The Journal of Jesuit Business Education. Faculty members Sarah Cabral, Joseph Cioni, Jeremy Evans, Amy LaCombe, and Michael Smith co-authored the article.

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Awards, appointments, and honors

  • Assistant Professor Sean Martin was named the inaugural Mancini Family Sesquicentennial Assistant Professor. Martin’s research focuses on the intersection of leadership, values, and organizational culture. The Mancini professorship, established through a gift by Raymond Mancini ’60, is part of BC’s ongoing efforts to support promising early-career faculty. Read an article about Martin's appointment.
  • Ronnie Sadka, chairperson and professor of finance and the Seidner Family Faculty Fellow, has been named the Carroll School of Management’s senior associate dean for faculty. Visit Sadka's faculty page.

 

MORE FACULTY AWARDS, APPOINTMENTS, AND HONORS »

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Faculty Research

 

FRAMING IS EVERYTHING

From the success of the sushi roll to candidate Donald Trump’s appeal to voters’ emotions, Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Simona Giorgi has synthesized the literature on framing—the packaging and organization of information—as a means to achieve resonance with an audience. She found that familiarity is what strikes a chord. For example, Thomas Edison successfully supplanted gas lights with electric light fixtures that mimicked their established competition. The Journal of Management Studies published Giorgi’s paper, “The Mind and Heart of Resonance: The Role of Cognition and Emotions in Frame Effectiveness.” READ AN ABSTRACT ON GIORGI'S FINDINGS »

 

ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT AND FINANCIAL REPORTING

The financial crisis of 2007–2008 underscored the need for companies to manage risk effectively. Professor of Accounting Jeffrey Cohen and collaborators interviewed the audit partners, CFOs, and audit committee members forming the “governance triad” at 11 public companies. They found that there is a critical link between enterprise risk management—a company’s integrated approach to evaluating and controlling risk—and financial reporting. Cohen’s study, “Enterprise Risk Management and the Financial Reporting Process: The Experiences of Audit Committee Members, CFOs, and External Auditors,” appeared in the Summer 2017 issue of Contemporary Accounting Research. READ AN ABSTRACT OF COHEN'S ARTICLE »

 

ON MARKDOWNS, KNOW THE STEPS OF A TRICKY DANCE

Tingliang Huang, assistant professor of operations management, examined posterior price-matching, in which a firm sells a product before marking it down, but with a promise to reimburse the price difference. In “Managing Posterior Price Matching: The Role of Customer Boundedly Rational Expectations,” published by Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, Huang and co-investigators present a model that isolates the role of customer bounded rationality in this interaction. They show when and how a seller can use price matching to make a profit.
READ HUANG'S ARTICLE
»

 

MORE FACULTY RESEARCH »

Rankings

 

The Carroll School earned the 11th spot in finance and the 23rd in management in U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of the best undergraduate business programs.  

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In the news

 

WHERE DIGITALLY MATURING COMPANIES NEED TO CATCH UP  

Few companies would dispute that they should adapt to increasingly digital markets and take advantage of digital technologies in order to improve operations. Yet, after surveying more than 3,500 managers and executives, Professor of Information Systems Gerald Kane and collaborators found that few companies are actually making the fundamental changes their leaders believe are necessary to achieve these goals. Forbes reported on Kane’s research, which was published last summer in the MIT Sloan Management Review. READ THE FORBES ARTICLE »

 

HOW YOUR NEURONS WORK AGAINST YOU

Why do we sell stocks at the wrong time—or make any number of irrational decisions, for that matter? O’Connor Family Professor Michael Pratt, who is also Ph.D. director in the Management and Organization Department, helped Discover readers understand the unconscious biases that lead humans to make snap judgments that may be good or bad, depending on the dilemma. READ PRATT'S COMMENTS IN DISCOVER »

 

DO STUDENT LOANS DELAY RETIREMENT SAVINGS?

The conventional wisdom is that paying off student debt prevents young professionals from saving for their retirement. Is it true? In a study of 1,400 subjects, the Center for Retirement Research found no proportional connection between debt and the nest egg by age 30. The Wall Street Journal reported on this surprising finding and published a Q&A with Matthew Rutledge, an economist at the center and the study’s lead author. READ THE Q&A IN THE WALL STREET JOURNAL »

 

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