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February 2017

February 2017
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Leading with ideas

 

HOW DO YOU MEASURE RESEARCH PRODUCTIVITY?  
(VERY CAREFULLY)

By Andy Boynton, John and Linda Powers Family Dean

As deans, each of us has the task of not only building and improving a research culture but also measuring it. Needless to say, it’s a challenge. Just how do you put a number on intellectual output and the creation of knowledge that makes a difference? Read more from Dean Andy Boynton »

Katherine V. Smith

Top stories

 

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP BOOSTS BUSINESSES

Boston College’s Center for Corporate Citizenship’s most recent State of Corporate Citizenship report, led by Executive Director Katherine V. Smith, shows that a majority of executives say their companies are more likely to succeed when they integrate corporate citizenship into their business strategies. View the report and executive summary »

 

CORCORAN CENTER SPARKS STUDENT RESTORATION PROJECT

Six Boston College undergraduates in the Joseph E. Corcoran Center for Real Estate and Urban Action’s Field Projects in Real Estate course are bringing to life a nascent effort to restore and revitalize the once grand, now dilapidated and shuttered Everett Square Theatre. Students this semester are analyzing the feasibility of turning the one-time vaudeville house and movie theater into a vital community anchor in Boston’s Hyde Park. Read the Boston Globe article »

 

A LINK BETWEEN SOUND AND COLOR FOR CONSUMERS

New research by Associate Professors of Marketing Henrik Hagtvedt and S. Adam Brasel shows that a connection between sound frequency and color lightness may guide visual attention—and could influence what consumers choose to view or buy. In a field study, for example, supermarket customers who heard high-frequency music were more inclined to purchase bananas displayed on a white shelf. But while lower-frequency music was playing, they opted for bananas on a black shelf. Read the BC News piece on the research » Listen to the STORY THAT AIRED ON NPR’S HERE AND NOW »

Jeffrey Pontiff

Awards and honors

 

Professor Jeffrey Pontiff, the James F. Cleary Chair in Finance, won the Journal of Finance’s top Amundi Smith Breeden Prize for his paper “Does Academic Research Destroy Stock Return Predictability?” (with R. David McLean).

Associate Professor of Operations Management Jiří Chod received the Manufacturing & Service Operations Management iFORM Special Interest Group’s Best Paper Award  for “Resource Flexibility and Capital Structure” (with Jianer Zhou).

More faculty honors »

Nailya Ordabayeva

Faculty research

 

LESS IS MORE—AND EASIER TO ESTIMATE

Humans are better at accurately estimating decreases in quantity or size (of food portions or packages, for example) than they are at estimating increases in quantity or size, according to findings by Assistant Professor of Marketing Nailya Ordabayeva published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology. Read Ordabayeva’s study »

 

LEAD UNDERWRITERS’ CONNECTIONS CAN BUOY IPO SUCCESS

A lead underwriter’s “location” in its network can affect the success of an initial public offering (IPO). A well-connected underwriter can disseminate information that draws institutional investors’ attention, gather information that is useful in pricing, and encourage greater valuations and returns, according to a Journal of Financial Economics paper by Professor of Finance and Hillenbrand Family Faculty Fellow Thomas J. Chemmanur, Griffith Family Millennium Chair in Finance and Senior Associate Dean of Faculty Hassan Tehranian, and coauthors. Read the JFE
paper »

 

PROXY ADVISORS INFLUENCE SHAREHOLDER VOTES

New research by Assistant Professor of Finance Nadya Malenko and a coauthor suggests that proxy advisory firms’ counsel has a marked effect on shareholder votes that determine key corporate decisions. Their paper appeared in The Review of Financial Studies. Read more about proxy advisor firms’ role »

 

More faculty research »

Rankings

 

In its 2017 global MBA rankings, Financial Times ranked the Carroll School number 17 in the world in faculty research productivity, up from number 54 in 2008. View the rankings »

Sean Martin

In the news

 

EMPLOYEES PREFER STORIES ABOUT PEERS, NOT THEIR BOSSES

A new study by Sean Martin, an assistant professor in the Management and Organization Department, shows that “heroic CEO stories”—tales of executives’ acumen, life history, or kindness—are less likely to influence employees’ behavior and values than stories about their coworkers and peers. Fast Company profiled the research. Read the Fast Company article »

 

DECEPTIVE DATA

Data analytics, a powerful tool for businesses, can be dangerously misleading when data do not accurately measure outcomes, says Assistant Professor of Information Systems Sam Ransbotham. IndustryWeek excerpted Ransbotham’s MIT Sloan Management Review blog post, “Duped by Data.” Read the IndustryWeek piece »

 

DOW REACHES HISTORIC MILESTONE

Forbes interviewed Darren Kisgen, an associate professor and the Hillenbrand Family Faculty Fellow in the Finance Department, about the Dow index crossing 20,000 for the first time in its history. “There’s no question it’s historic and pretty remarkable, especially if you consider this in the context of where we were seven years ago,” Kisgen said. Read the Forbes report »

 

More in the news »