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Undergraduate teaching awards

June 2015

The 2015 Diane Harkins Coughlin and Christopher J. Coughlin Faculty Excellence Award in Undergraduate Teaching Winners

By Zachary Jason

Bridget Akinc

 

BRIDGET AKINC

 

When the Carroll School's 2015 Diane Harkins Coughlin and Christopher J. Coughlin Faculty Excellence Award in Undergraduate Teaching winner Bridget Akinc teaches Marketing Principles and Marketing Practicum, the senior lecturer says she follows Ben Franklin’s adage: “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” “In a discipline like marketing, where change and innovation are advancing the practice every day, we look to connect to industry through projects, cases, and application exercises, and we learn by doing,” says Akinc.

 

In class, Akinc also shares lessons learned during her 12 years as a market strategy and sales leader for companies such as BEA Systems and a Kleiner Perkins-backed software startup, where she was “deeply immersed in questions about the market and market strategy where there wasn’t one clear right answer.” A Princeton graduate, she joined the Boston College faculty in 2013 after earning her executive MBA from MIT.


George Wyner

GEORGE WYNER

 

“If we’re going to talk about technology, we need to be hands on,” says George Wyner, associate professor of the practice of information systems and winner of the Carroll School's 2015 Diane Harkins Coughlin and Christopher J. Coughlin Faculty Excellence Award in Undergraduate Teaching. Every semester, Wyner updates his courses in Computers in Management and Systems Analysis so that his students always wrestle with the latest technologies (exercises in cloud computing and Amazon Prime are among the most recent). “If we’re learning new stuff together, that keeps me more engaged,” he says. “It also fosters an ‘I can figure this out’ attitude.”

 

In addition to his enthusiasm and humor, Wyner, who holds a Ph.D. in management from MIT, is also known for playing music as students walk into class and his extensive collection of technology-themed T-shirts.