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Spring 2016 Approved Courses

women's and gender studies program

Below are course titles, numbers, and descriptions for approved Spring 2016 courses.

 

Required Courses for Minors

Department Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
Cross-Listed Introduction to Feminisms SOCY222501  (COMM222501/ENGL2125/HIST250201) OWENS
T TH 4:30-5:45
Description: This course is taught by Women's Studies faculty to acquaint students with a large range of academic and life experience topics that have been affected by Women's Studies scholarship. After a preliminary meeting, the class divides into 12-14 person seminars that meet once per week to discuss and study such issues as women's history, feminist theory, sex roles, socialization, gender and health, religion, work, and literature and essays by and about women. The course emphasizes participation and collective work on projects and usually includes a continuing personal and readings-oriented journal.
Cross-Listed Introduction to Feminisms SOCY222502 (COMM222502/HIST250202) OWENS

M W

4:30-5:45

Description: This course is taught by Women's Studies faculty to acquaint students with a large range of academic and life experience topics that have been affected by Women's Studies scholarship. After a preliminary meeting, the class divides into 12-14 person seminars that meet once per week to discuss and study such issues as women's history, feminist theory, sex roles, socialization, gender and health, religion, work, and literature and essays by and about women. The course emphasizes participation and collective work on projects and usually includes a continuing personal and readings-oriented journal.

Elective Courses

Department Title Course Code Professor Meeting Time
Classics
Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome
CLAS227001
SUTHERLAND
MWF 12-12:50

Description:
In this course, we will examine Roman views on gender and sexuality during a period covering approximately 200 BCE to 200 CE. We will use literature, epigraphy, and material culture to reconstruct what the ideals of behavior were for Roman men and women, what constituted deviation from these ideals, and how real Romans may actually behaved.

Communication
Media and Cultural Studies
COMM2236
INGRAM T TH 12-1:15
Description: This course will analyze the many ways power is consolidated, negotiated, or resisted through popular media, especially advertising, television, film, and social media. We will examine how correspondences between mass communication and economic structures impact cultural, political, and ideological processes in society, including (but not limited to) the construction of gender roles, sexual norms, racial and ethnic identities, class affiliations, and attitudes towards violence. This course will be theoretically rooted in the critical tradition of media studies, with particular emphasis on 20th century continental and American cultural and social theory. Major Restricted
Communication
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Difference
COMM2180 INGRAM
MWF 11-11:50
Description: Satisfies one of three elective courses required within the Communication major
This course will examine constructions of masculinity and sexuality in Western society from a critical cultural perspective. We will consider the ways in which cultural narratives about ?acceptable? masculine behaviors and attitudes catalyze social conflicts, reinforce established power hierarchies, and organize the modes of being available to people of different gender identities and sexual orientations. We will also evaluate the liberatory potential of emergent discourses and practices that seek to cultivate greater acceptance of diversity, and promote social healing. There will be a concentrated focus on popular cultural forms (especially television, film, music, sports, and social media) that are particularly influential to contemporary men and boys.
Communication
Gender Roles and Communication
COMM4451
CUKLANZ T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a Women's and Gender Studies minor course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through communication. The early section of the course compares historical and theoretical approaches to representations of gender in communication texts. Then, building on these comparisons, students read about, examine, and analyze texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertising. Major Restricted
Communication
Advanced Topics
COMM4941
CUKLANZ
T 3-5:20
Description:
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.
Communication
Media:Pop Culture
COMM4463
OWENS
M W 6-7:15
Description: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major
Media are a significant and primary contributor of popular culture in American society. This writing intensive course will explore and critically analyze the role of media in constructing and reflecting popular norms, values, and trends. Students will use a variety of texts to discuss the extent to which various types of media, including video games, music, TV, and magazines shape and reinforce society's ideas regarding issues such as race, class, gender, war, and patriotism.
English Versions in Black: Genres of Black Women's Writing
ENGL2201
FREDERICK T TH 12-1:15
Description:
The phrase "Black Women's Writing" suggests that such writing is a fixed or homogeneous body of work that can be neatly defined and represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea. By re-thinking these works, we also re-examine notions of literary canon, race, gender, sexuality, community, and history. Significantly, we "de-construct" common notions of Black Women's Writing by examining the varied genres these writers use to express their imaginings. Required readings come from the fields of science fiction (Octavia Butler), prose/experimental (Gayl Jones and Martha Southgate) novels, drama (Suzan-Lori Parks), poetry (Elizabeth Alexander), and autobiography/memoir (Toi Derricotte).
English Women and Russian Literature
ENGL1153
SIMMONS
T TH 10:30-11:45
Description: All texts read in English translation
A study of the representations of women in Russian literary works from the Kievan period to date, with a special emphasis on classical and post-modern literature. An exploration of the notions of the "strong woman" versus the "superfluous man", and of "terrible perfection", a discussion of the utility of these concepts in characterizing the literary representations.
English Gender and Sexuality in Victorian Literature
ENGL6613 HUNT T 2-4:25
Description:
This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy.
History Sex, Sexuality, and Gender
HIST4249 CAVALLARI M 4:30-6:55
An integral part of the human experience, sex, sexuality and gender have repeatedly been dissected, defined, evaluated, feared and celebrated. In the process, these topics have also become central to questions of identity, history, politics and culture. Through reading and discussion of primary and secondary texts, this course introduces students to the multiple and conflicting roles that sex, sexuality, and gender have played in modern Western societies from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include the critical examination of gender and its construction; the social control of "deviant" sexualities; notions of sex and the historical construction of sexual identity; sex, sexuality and gender in public discourse; and queer theory in historical practice.
History Women and Gender in Modern China
HIST4048
MO MWF 1-1:50
Description:
This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy.
Islamic Civilization and Societies
Women and Gender in Islam
ICSP3310 DELONG-BAS MWF 1-1:50
Description:
This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status.
Italian Love, Sexuality, & Gender/European Literary Tradition
ITAL3373 MORMANDO T TH 12-1:15
Description: Conducted entirely in English. Elective for Italian major and minor.
This course explores the modern conception of "romantic love" by examining its birth and development in prominent literary works (by men and women) of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. We will also investigate allied notions of sexuality, gender, and marriage, in both a heterosexual and same-sex ("homosexual") context. For contrast and comparison, the course begins with a study of the Bible and ancient Greek and Roman texts and ends with a look at the depiction of our themes in contemporary cinema as well as a discussion of the current debate in American society over the nature and purpose of marriage.
Lynch School of Education
Gender Roles APSY3248 PORTILLO W 4:30-6:50
COURSE RESTRICTED TO LSOE STUDENTS ONLY. This course examines biological, social, and psychological factors that interact in contributing to men's and women's gender roles. Within the social domain, particular attention will be given to how culture affects the social construction of gender, and how factors such as racism and homophobia interact with societally prescribed norms for men and women. The second half of the class will focus on the effects of gender roles on mental and physical health, social problems like aggression, and issues in education, work, and relationships including family life.
Sociology
Deviance and Social Control
SOCY1030
PFOHL T TH 1:30-2:45
Description: This course explores the social construction of boundaries between the "normal" and the so-called "deviant." It examines the struggle between powerful forms of social control and what these exclude, silence, or marginalize. Of particular concern is the relationship between dominant forms of religious, legal, and medical social control and gendered, racialized and global economic structures of power. The course provides an in-depth historical analysis of theoretical perspectives used to explain, study and control deviance, as well as ethical-political inquiry into such matters as religious excess, crime, madness, corporate and governmental wrong-doing, and sexual subcultures that resist dominant social norms.
Sociology
Gender and Sports
SOCY3358
KIM T TH 12-1:15
Description: This course uses sport to understand gender relations in a society. The course examines the ways that gender and intersections of race, class, sexuality are produced by and within relations of power, and how normative definitions of gender and its intersections underpin normative practices in sport, health, and physical cultural contexts. Drawing on feminist scholarship, this course provides a critical insight into the history of gender relations, and how gender is used to reproduce and resist inequalities in sport, health, and physical culture.
Sociology Adv. Topics: Transnational Feminisms
SOCY5593 HESSE-BIBER TH 3-5:30
Description:
This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semester senior Women's & Gender Studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only.