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College of Arts and Sciences

Boyd Taylor Coolman

theology department

Boyd Taylor Coolman

Associate Professor

Stokes N321
Boston College
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467

Phone: 617-552-3971
Fax: 617-552-0794
Email: boyd.coolman@bc.edu


Curriculum Vitae
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Office Hours

EDUCATION

Ph.D., History of Christianity, University of Notre Dame
MDiv, Historical Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary
BA, Philosophy/Economics, Wheaton College

BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY

Prior to joining the faculty at Boston College, Coolman was a visiting professor at Duke Divinity School (2002-2005) and at Yale Divinity School (2004-2005).

RESEARCH INTERESTS

His research interests are in the history of Christian theology, particularly in the medieval period. He is especially interested in the life and thought of the Victorines in the first half of the twelfth century and in developments in early thirteenth-century scholastic theology at the Universities of Paris and Oxford.

TEACHING

Introduction to Medieval Theology
The Victorine School in the Middle Ages
Medieval Trinitarian Theology
Dionysian Mysticism in the Middle Ages

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND AWARDS

Co-founder of the "Boston Colloquy in Historical Theology"

Founding member of the editorial board, Victorine Texts in English Translation (forthcoming with Brepols Publishers), to publish English language translations of the writings of the twelfth- and thirteenth-century Victorines

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Knowledge, Love, and Ecstasy in Thomas Gallus, Oxford University Press, [forthcoming in the monograph series "Changing Paradigms in Historical and Systematic Theology," eds., Sarah Coakley and Richard Cross]

In whom I am well pleased: Hugh of St. Victor’s Trinitarian Aesthetics,” Pro Ecclesia 23-N3 (2014): 331-54.

“‘Transgressing [its] measure … trespassing the mode and law of its beauty’: Sin and the Beauty of the Soul in Hugh of St. Victor,” in From Knowledge to Beatitude:  St Victor, Twelfth-Century Scholars and Beyond, eds. Lesley Smith and Ann Matter (University of Notre Dame Press, 2013), pp. 186-203.

“Victorine Mysticism” in The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Christian Mysticism, ed., Julia A. Lamm, Wiley-Blackwell (2012), 251-66.

“Hugh of St. Victor’s Influence on the Halensian Definition of Theology,” Franciscan Studies 70 (2012): pp. 367-84.

“Thomas Gallus,” The Spiritual Senses: Perceiving God in Western Christianity, eds. Paul Gavrilyuk and Sarah Coakley, Cambridge University Press, 2011, pp. 140-58.

“Alexander of Hales,” The Spiritual Senses: Perceiving God in Western Christianity, eds. Paul Gavrilyuk and Sarah Coakley, Cambridge University Press, 2011, pp. 121-39.

The Theology of Hugh of St. Victor: An Interpretation, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Trinity and Creation, Vol. 1 in Victorine Texts in Translation, eds., Boyd Taylor Coolman and Dale M. Coulter, Brepols Publishers, 2010.

Introduction,” Trinity and Creation," Vol. 1 in Victorine Texts in Translation, eds., Boyd Taylor Coolman and Dale M. Coulter, Brepols Publishers, 2010, 23-48.

“William of Auxerre” in Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy, Springer (2010).

“Harmony of Similar and Dissimilar Things in Richard of St. Victor’s De Emmanuele,” Transforming Relations: Essays on Jews and Christians throughout History in Honor of Michael A. Signer, University of Notre Dame Press, 2010.

“Gestimmtheit: Attunement as a Description of the Nature-Grace Relationship in Karl Rahner’s Theology,” Theological Studies 70.4 (2009) 782-800.

“The Medieval Affective Dionysian Tradition” in Re-Thinking Dionysius, eds., Sarah Coakley and Charles M. Stang, Modern Theology 24.4 (2008): 615-32.

“Hugh of St. Victor on ‘Jesus Wept’: Compassion as Ideal humanitas,” Theological Studies 69.3 (2008): 528-556.

“The Salvific Affectivity of Christ in Alexander of Hales,” The Thomist 71 (2007): 1-38.

“Hugh of St Victor,” in Jeffrey P. Greenman, Timothy Larsen, and Stephen Spencer (eds), The Sermon on the Mount through the Centuries (Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2007), 72-102.

 

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