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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty

latin american studies

Sarah Beckjord

Sarah Beckjord

Associate Professor, Romance Laguages and Literatures
Ph.D., Columbia University

Beckford's faculty web page
E-mail: sarah.beckjord@bc.edu

Professor Beckjord teaches courses on Latin American literature and culture, with particular emphasis on the colonial period and 19th century. She is especially interested in the cross-fertilization of aesthetic and ideological trends between Latin America and Europe, and has published articles on the 19th-century Cuban anti-slavery narrative and on the chronicles of the Conquest of Mexico. Her book Territories of History: Humanism, Rhetoric, and the Historical Imagination in the Early Chronicles of Spanish America (Penn State University Press, 2007), examines 16th-century debates that emerged over the writing of the history of the New World and their parallels in recent narrative theory.


 

Maria Estela Brisk

María Estela Brisk

Professor, Lynch School of Education
Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Brisk's faculty web page
E-mail: maria.brisk.1@bc.edu

A native of Argentina, Professor Brisk teaches courses in language and literacy development, the social context of education, and methods of teaching bilingual learners and teaching writing informed by Systemic Functional Linguistics theory. She is the author of 6 books, among them: Bilingual Education: From Compensatory to Quality Schooling, Literacy and Bilingualism: A Handbook for ALL Teachers, and Engaging Students in Academic Literacies.


 

Rhonda Frederick

Rhonda Frederick

Associate Professor, English
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Frederick's faculty web page
E-mail: rhonda.frederick.1@bc.edu

Professor Frederick teaches Caribbean and African American literatures and cultures at Boston College. She is also interested in 20th-century popular fiction (futurist fiction and fantasy, detective/mystery fiction) and literatures of the African Diaspora. Her research interests are in Post-Colonial Studies, Cultural Studies, and narratives of migration. She is the author of Colón Man a Come: Mythographies of Panamá Canal Migration (Lexington Books [Rowman & Littlefield], 2005), published in the Caribbean Studies Series (series editors Shona N. Jackson and Anton Allahar).


 

Brian Gareau

Brian Gareau

Associate Professor, Sociology
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz

Gareau’s faculty web page
E-mail: brian.gareau@bc.edu

Professor Gareau’s professional work focuses on the sociology of global environmental governance, especially the governance of ozone layer depletion and global climate change. He also publishes on theorizations of society/nature relations, alternative developments, and the possibility of making global agriculture socio‐ecologically sustainable.


 

Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Goizueta

Professor, Theology
Ph.D., Marquette University

Goizueta's faculty web page
E-mail: roberto.goizueta.1@bc.edu

Professor Goizueta teaches courses on Latin American and U.S. Latino/a theologies. His publications–including the book Caminemos con Jesús: Toward a Hispanic/Latino Theology of Accompaniment (Orbis Books, 1995)–examine the relationship between theology and culture, focusing especially on popular religion as a source for theological reflection.


 

Ernesto Livón-Grosman

Ernesto Livon-Grosman

Associate Professor, Romance Languages and Literatures
Ph.D., New York University

Livon-Grosman's faculty web page
E-mail: ernesto.livon-grosman@bc.edu

Born in Argentina, Ernesto Livon-Grosman teaches at Boston College where he is the Director of the Latin American Studies Program and a member of the Romance Languages and Literatures Department. He has directed several documentary films, including Cartoneros (2006), Brascó (2013), Alberto Salomón: Interview (2014), and MADI (2016) among others. He is the author of Geografías Imaginarias (Beatriz Viterbo Editor, 2004) the editor of José Lezama Lima: Selections (University of California Press, 2005) and co-editor with Cecilia Vicuña of The Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry: A Bilingual Anthology (Oxford University Press, 2009). He is also de curator of two digitalization projects: XUL: Signo Viejo y Nuevo and Ailleurs both of them part of O’Neil Library's Digital Collection.


 

M. Brinton Lykes

M. Brinton Lykes

Professor of Community Cultural Psychology
Lynch School of Education
Ph.D., Boston College

Lykes's faculty web page
E-mail: brinton.lykes.1@bc.edu

Professor Lykes teaches courses in Participatory Action Research and on psychosocial perspectives on child, family, and society, focusing on the USA, Latin America, and South Africa. She is a community psychologist and activist and has lived and worked among women and child survivors of state-sponsored violence and war in rural Guatemala, the North of Ireland, and South Africa. Her research focuses on indigenous cultural beliefs and practices and those of Western psychology, towards creating community-based psychosocial and educational development programs. Her recent publications include, Myths about the Powerless: Contesting Social Inequalities, and a co-authored photo essay, Mujeres Mayas Ixiles de Chajul/Voices and images: Maya Ixil women of Chajul.


 

John Michalczyk

John Michalczyk

Professor, Fine Arts
Ph.D., Harvard University; M.Div., Weston School of Theology

Michalczyk's faculty web page
E-mail: john.michalczyk.1@bc.edu

Professor Michalczyk is Director of the Film Studies program in the Fine Arts department. In addition to teaching courses on Latin American cinema, he is also a documentary filmmaker, focusing on social-justice issues.


 

Irene Mizrahi

Irene Mizrahi

Associate Professor, Romance Languages & Literatures
Ph.D., M.A., University of Connecticut;
B.S. Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

Mizrahi’s faculty web page
E-mail: irene.mizrahi@bc.edu

Dr. Irene Mizrahi is an associate professor of Hispanic Studies at Boston College. Her research focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish literature, Romanticism, and Post-Civil War literature in particular. Her publications include studies on works by José de Espronceda, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rubén Darío, Juan Larrea, Antonio Buero Vallejo, and Carmen Laforet. She is the author of La poética dialógica de Bécquer (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1998), Resentimiento y moral en el teatro de Buero Vallejo (Valladolid: Universitas Castellae, 2002), and El trauma del franquismo y su testimonio crítico en Nada de Carmen Laforet (Newark: Juan de la Cuesta, 2010). She is currently writing a book on Miguel de Unamuno. In addition, she has co-authored a textbook, Español para los negocios: Estudios de casos (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998). Her articles have appeared in journals such as Anales de la literatura española contemporánea, Boletín de estudios becquerianos, Decimonónica, Hispanic Research Journal, Hispanic Review, Inti, Letras peninsulares, Revista hispánica moderna, Siglo diecinueve, and L’érudit Franco Espagnol.


 

Gustavo Morello, S.J.

Gustavo Morello, S.J.

Assistant Professor, Sociology
Ph.D., Universidad de Buenos Aires; M.A. in Social Science, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba

Morello, S.J.'s faculty web page
E-mail: gustavo.morello@bc.edu

My research agenda focuses on two main topics in the Latin American context, a) the relation between religion and political violence, and b) secularization. My most recent book explored these complicated links by examining why, in 1970s Argentina, honest religious people didn’t react strongly against massive violations of human rights. My main finding was that the way Catholics dealt with the religious transformation brought about by modernization conditioned the way they responded to political violence. The research I have done is on a group of persons who were kidnapped and tortured in 1976. Since their case was on trial, the prosecutor asked me to provide my expertise to the Court (that happened in Cordoba, Argentina in May 2015). Hopefully, the work I have done will be useful for the victims to get justice. My future research, which has been funded by John Templeton Foundation with a $511,000 grant, will allow me to build a research network between BC and three Latin American universities. We will explore the transformations of lived religiosity in urban Latin Americans. Our qualitative study includes an original methodological approach (meaningful objects elicitation) and it will be one of the first comparative qualitative studies on religiosity in Latin America. My main publications in the last three years have been: The Catholic Church and Argentina's Dirty War (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Dónde estaba Dios? Los católicos y el terrorismo de estado (Ediciones B, Buenos Aires, 2014).


 

Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Assistant Professor, Theology and Latino/Latina Ministry
Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union, M.Div., Seattle University

Pineda-Madrid's faculy web page
E-mail: pinedama@bc.edu

Professor Pineda-Madrid offers courses examining critical theologies of liberation with a special interest in women in Latin America, and U. S. Latinos/as. She is especially interested in the meaning of salvation in light of violence and trauma experienced by women. As the first theologian to publish a book on the evil of feminicide, she argues that this tragedy demands a fresh consideration of what salvation means in her book, Suffering and Salvation in Ciudad Juárez, (Fortress Press, 2011). She is currently working on the religious symbol of La Virgen de Guadalupe as integral to the meaning of salvation given the current context of violence against women. 


 

Jennie Purnell

Jennie Purnell

Associate Professor, Political Science
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Purnell's faculty web page
E-mail: jennie.purnell.1@bc.edu

Jennie Purnell teaches courses on comparative politics, several of which focus on Latin America. She is especially interested in social movements, human rights, transitional justice, and state formation. Her current research project examines the impact of military service on the ways in which indigenous peasants interacted with the state in late nineteenth-century Mexico.


 

Elizabeth Rhodes

Elizabeth Rhodes

Professor, Hispanic Studies
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College

Rhodes’ faculty webpage
E-mail: Elizabeth.rhodes@bc.edu

Elizabeth Rhodes researches early modern Spanish literature, theology and religious culture, and feminist theory, fields that have intersected in her translation and scholarship and her most recent book, Dressed to Kill: Death and Meaning in Zayas's Desengaños. (Toronto, London: Univ. Toronto Press, 2011). Her course offerings in Latin American Studies include Spanish 6636: Borderlines: Films of Exile and Migration.


 

Sylvia Sellers-García

Sylvia Sellers-García

Associate Professor, History
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Sellers-García's faculty web page
E-mail: sylvia.sellers-garcia@bc.edu

Professor Sellers-García’s teaching interests include colonial Latin America, the Spanish empire, and the meetings points between history and fiction. Her 2013 book, Distance and Documents at the Spanish Empire's Periphery, considers the early modern conception of distance as expressed through the authorship, transportation, and storage of documents. Her current research focuses on criminal cases in eighteenth-century Guatemala.