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Art, Art History and Film

Stephanie Leone

fine arts department

photo of The Palazzo Pamphilj in Piazza Navona book

 

Associate Professor

M.A., Syracuse University, Graduate Program in Renaissance Art, Florence
Ph.D., Rutgers University

Devlin Hall 421
617-552-6459
stephanie.leone@bc.edu

Fields of Interest

Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, architecture and urbanism; domestic art and architecture; material culture; patronage; Renaissance Florence; Papal Rome

Academic Profile

Stephanie Leone’s primary field of research is domestic art and architecture and material culture in seventeenth-century Rome. She is currently writing a book manuscript about the architectural projects by Pope Innocent X Pamphilj (r. 1644-1655) and his family, in mid-seventeenth-century Rome, which aims to provide the first comprehensive study of this pope’s architectural and urban patronage. Dr. Leone has published articles about the Pamphilj collections and the display of art in the Palazzo Doria Pamphilj al Corso. Her book on the Palazzo Pamphilj in Piazza Navona, Rome considers the intersection between palaces and social rituals and the roles of architects, patrons, and advisors in building.

Teaching

Professor Leone teaches courses about all aspects of Italian art from ca. 1300 to 1750, such as Early Renaissance Art in Italy, Italian Baroque Art and Architecture, and Sixteenth-Century Italian Art. She is currently created a new intermediate-level course on Venetian Art and Architecture. In undergraduate seminars, she explores topics related to her research: Italian palaces; domestic architecture around the world, co-taught with Prof. Bloom; the arts of the Mediterranean world, co-taught with Prof. Bloom; and the history of collecting and museums, co-taught with Prof. Netzer. Leone teaches an interdisciplinary course on the history, art, and literature of early modern Rome with colleagues from History and Romance Languages.

Representative Publications

  • “Luca Signorelli’s Veturia Persuading Coriolanus to Spare Rome and Viewers in the Palazzo Petrucci, Siena,” in Receptions of Antiquity, Constructions of Gender in European Art, 1300–1600, eds. Marice Rose and Alison C. Poe. Leiden: Brill, 2015, 131–168.
  • “L’intervento dei Pamphilj nello sviluppo urbanistico di piazza Navona,” in Piazza Navona, ou Place Navone, la plus belle & la plus grande: Du stade de Domitien à la place moderne: histoire d’une évolutione urbaine, ed. Jean-François Bernard. Rome: L’École française de Rome, 2014, 385-397.
  • "Prince Giovanni Battista Pamphilj (1648–1709) and the Display of Art in the Palazzo al Collegio Romano, Rome," Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, 58 (2013) 181-214. 
  • Editor, The Pamphilj and the Arts: Patronage and Consumption in Baroque Rome (Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art; Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).
  • “Cardinal Benedetto Pamphilj's Art Collection: Still-life Painting and the Cost of Collecting,” in The Pamphilj and the Arts: Patronage and Consumption in Baroque Rome.
  • The Palazzo Pamphilj in Piazza Navona: Constructing Identity in Early Modern Rome (London: Harvey Miller—Brepols, 2008).
  • "In vogue in fifteenth-century Florence: the material culture of marriage," in Secular/Sacred: 11th–16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art; Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006).
  • Co-edited with Lisa Fentress, Caroline Goodson, Margaret Laird, Walls and Memory: the Abbey of San Sebastiano at Alatri (Lazio), from Late Roman Monastery to Renaissance Villa and Beyond (Turnhout: Brepols, 2005).
  • “From Medieval Monastery to Early Renaissance Villa: the patronage of Giovanni Tortelli,” and “The fattoria of the Doria Pamphilj,” in Walls and Memory: the Abbey of San Sebastiano at Alatri (Lazio), from Late Roman Monastery to Renaissance Villa and Beyond.
  • “Cardinal Giovanni Battista Pamphilj Builds a Palace: Self-Representation and Familial Ambition in Early Modern Rome.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 63 (2004): 440–71.

Website

 

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