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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

News and Features

morrissey college and graduate school of arts and sciences

Archived News and Features by Year

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2017


Sam Gray

Student Makes Mark in Marathon Debut
Sam Gray '19, an A&S theology and economics double major finished 65th in a field of more than 30,000 runners in his Boston Marathon debut yesterday. BC News

Eric Skerry

Historical Perspective on Immigration
The current liberal perspective on immigration policy represents a shift that has not received much scrutiny, writes Professor of Political Science Peter Skerry, who provides historical background in the Boston Sunday Globe "Ideas."—a piece also highlighted by the New York Times. | Earlier this month he wrote on the Muslim Brotherhood's U.S. presence for Foreign Affairs.

Eric Weiskott

The Power of Poetry
A petition at Yale University signifies that now is the time to teach new kinds of poetry—and to teach the old kinds in new ways, writes Assistant Professor of English Eric Weiskott. Inside Higher Ed

Pat Byrne

Professor of Philosophy Patrick H. Byrne will receive a Madonna Della Strada Award, the highest honor presented by the Ignatian Volunteer Corps, N.E. Region. It recognizes those who embody the Jesuit tradition of direct service to the poor and of working and educating for a more just society. BC News

Boston College Arts and Sciences Spring 2017 E-Newsletter

 

James O'Toole

To mark Black History Month, The Pilot has presented a three-part series by Clough Millennium Professor of History James O'Toole exploring the life and legacy of the nation's first African-American bishop, Bishop James Augustine Healy, and his family. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Martha Bayles

Will the media be crushed? MCAS Honors Program Visiting Associate Professor Martha Bayles writing for the Boston Globe "Ideas."

Is chaos the new normal, and how should the media and voters respond? Professor of History Heather Cox Richardson on NECN "The Take."

Kevin Kenny

Will Mexico fund the wall? Professor of History Kevin Kenny is among experts asked to weigh in. WalletHub

Juliet Schor

Sociology Professor Juliet Schor is being featured in a documentary being shown around the world on Al-Jazeer (on-line in the U.S. only.) Part 1 aired on February 10, part 2 will air on February 17.

Assistant Professor of Communication Matt Sienkiewicz writes on President Trump's statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day in an op-ed for Tikkun Daily.

Professor of History Heather Cox Richardson's Facebook post on the immigration order as a "shock event" (first cited in the 2/2 edition of UPDATE) continues to gain attention, garnering more than 80,000 shares to date and additional media attention including from the Boston Globe and USA Today.

Jesse L. Mu '17 has won a coveted Winston Churchill Scholarship, awarded to the nation's top students in science, mathematics, and engineering for graduate study at the University of Cambridge. Mu, a member of the Gabelli Presidential Scholars Program who majors in computer science and minors in mathematics, won a Goldwater Scholarship last year. BC News

Clough Millennium Professor of History James O'Toole comments on Boston Mayor Marty Walsh's response on the travel ban, which has elevated him to the national stage: Boston Globe.

Professor of History Patrick Maney provided live commentary for WHDH-TV News during its coverage of the presidential inauguration. The segment is now available to view online.

Professor of Political Science Marc Landy was interviewed on the presidential inauguration by WBZ-AM, which has now made the audio available.

Professor of Sociology Sharlene Hesse-Biber discusses her research into the emotional journey of those who carry the BRCA gene mutation, which places them at a high risk of developing breast and other cancers, as part of an award-winning film on the subject now available on iTunes.

For decades, the unemployment rate has been one of the basic barometers of the American economy. While no single metric is infallible, experts including Associate Professor of Economics Robert Murphy, a former White House adviser, say the rate does a solid job. CNN Money

Cox Richardson

A Facebook post in which Professor of History Heather Cox Richardson suggested that the presidential travel ban bears the hallmarks of historic "shock events" designed to distract the public from a different agenda went viral earlier this week. The piece has since been published in full by the Dallas Morning News, and shared by numerous other outlets. She discussed it on WBUR News.

Eric Weiskott

The history of political elites instrumentalizing poor people is as long as the history of poverty itself, writes Assistant Professor of English Eric Weiskott, who relates contemporary discourse around poverty to the similar themes of a medieval poem is an essay for the Times Literary Supplement.

"Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things," which premiered in theaters last spring, explores living with less stuff from a variety of perspectives, including that of Professor of Sociology Juliet Schor, whose research has focused on issues of work, consumption, and sustainability. The film is now available on Netflix and Amazon.

 

 

 

On the eve of the presidential inauguration, NPR "On Point" host Tom Ashbrook moderated a discussion streamed live from the JFK Library on opportunities and challenges for the Trump administration, with panelists including Heather Cox Richardson. WBUR.com | Jonathan Laurence provided commentary on the inauguration for French television news network BFM. |  Patrick Maney commented on President Obama's last day and legacy for CNBC and Fox News.

The rise of franken as a prefix to characterize human efforts to interfere with nature can be traced back to the use in 1992 of "frankenfood" in a letter penned by Professor of English Paul Lewis to the New York Times. Slate

Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences biology major Cara O'Connell '18 has a small speaking part in the new feature film about the Boston Marathon attacks. Daily News

Professor of Russian and English Maxim D. Shrayer revisits the dawn of perestroika in an essay published in the Freedom issue of Perspectives of the Association of Jewish Studies.

What will the first 100 days of the Trump Administration bring for immigration, health care, the economy, the environment, and other areas? Political Science's Kay Schlozman, Dennis Hale, and David Hopkins weigh in for the Boston College Chronicle.

Joe Quinn

Research by Professor of Economics Joseph Quinn—conducted with alumni Kevin Cahill and Michael Giandrea, who received their master's and doctoral degrees in economics from BC—has shown that a majority of older Americans earn an income during "retirement" years. Their findings are highlighted in an article on phased retirement (also known as "unretirement") and other improvements made to Norway's retirement system. DowJones Marketwatch

Sam Richardson

Can the GOP improve on the Affordable Care Act? Associate Professor of the Practice of Economics Sam Richardson weighs in on NECN "The Take."

An issue that has dominated American politics in the 21st century that is especially intertwined with sports culture is economic inequality, writes Assistant Professor of Communication Michael Serazio, who outlines findings from his nationally representative survey on the relationship between sports fandom and political attitudes, conducted with Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Thorson. Bloomberg View | Serazio also writes on "the disorienting melancholy" of attending the San Diego Chargers' last game before the team's relocation to Los Angeles: SportsIllustrated.com.

Eric Weiskott

Stories that gain popularity by presenting readers' fantasies and nightmares as current events are hardly new, writes Assistant Professor of English Eric Weiskott, who explores the effect of false prophecies in medieval Britain in an essay for The Atlantic.

Lindsey Orourke

The U.S. tried to change other countries' governments 72 times during the Cold War, according to Assistant Professor of Political Science Lindsey O'Rourke, who looks at how past U.S. covert operations shed light on the 2016 Russian hacking in a piece for the WashingtonPost.com.

Devin Pendas

The United Nations General Assembly has voted to establish an independent panel to assist in the investigation and prosecution of those responsible for war crimes or crimes against humanity in Syria. Associate Professor of History Devin Pendas discussed the topic as a guest on NECN "The Take."