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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Writing Workshops

english department

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM

ENGLISH ELECTIVES OFFERED SPRING 2017

 

 

ENGL2221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.

The Department

ENGL2221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.
The Department
ENGL2221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.
The Department

ENGL2221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.

The Department

ENGL2221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.

The Department

ENGL4412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (Fall, Spring:3.0)

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First Year Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing electives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer.

The Department

ENGL4412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (Fall, Spring:3.0)

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First Year Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing electives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer.

The Department

ENGL4412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (Fall, Spring:3.0)

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First Year Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing electives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer.

The Department

ENGL4412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (Fall, Spring:3.0)

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First Year Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing electives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer.

The Department

ENGL4432 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Food and Culture Writing (Spring:3.0)

In this creative writing workshop, the interconnection between food and culture will be explored from farm to table. Drawing on the city of Boston and its deeply rooted culinary traditions, we’ll consider the rituals connected to food-making and eating. Literary readings will highlight the early settlers who created a distinct New England cuisine, and the recent ethnic groups and artisanal food makers who have shaped today’s culinary landscape. Students will explore the way food and identity are inextricably linked by engaging in a variety of writing tasks from memoir to literary profiles of people, food, and place.

Lynne Anderson

Permission of instructor required for admission.

Students in this course will be selected on the basis of manuscript submission.  Please submit up to 10 double-spaced pages of writing, which can be an entire piece, part of a longer piece, or a compilation of shorter ones.  You can explain the nature of what you have submitted in an accompanying note.  Be sure to include your name and email address.  Materials should be submitted to Carlo Rotella via email (rotellca@bc.edu) as soon as possible.  Students will be notified by email as to whether they have been admitted to the course.

Carlo Rotella

ENGL4577 Writing Workshop: Poetry (Fall, Spring:3.0)

A course in writing poetry in a variety of forms, with an emphasis on craft and revision. Students will produce roughly one poem a week and will workshop each other's drafts in group discussion.

Allison Adair

ENGL4579 Writing Workshop: Fiction (Fall, Spring:3.0)

Enrollment limited to 15.

This course provides encouragement, practice, and criticism for students seriously interested in writing short fiction. The workshop format demands self-motivation and universal participation. Since students' stories are texts for class discussion, a generous willingness to respond to others' writing and to expose one's own work to such reactions is an essential prerequisite. Individual conferences with the instructor supplement the workshop discussions. Students are expected to produce a steady stream of new and revised fiction throughout the semester. Narrative preferences from the traditional to the experimental are welcome.

Suzanne Berne

Fiction, in many forms

The workshop will explore the manner in which honing our skills in three fundamental areas - story, character, dialogue - can help the emerging writer to make advances in many different forms and genres of fiction. We will workshop some of our own pieces, of course, but also we will look at examples of great work in the different forms - we'll look at the short story, the novel, the stage play, the radio play, the narrative essay, and see the way that creative success in each of these forms is built up from those same three fundamentals. My hope is that students will finish the workshop not just with new creative projects in mind, but perhaps determined to try out new and unexpected forms of fiction.

Kevin Barry

ENGL4588 Business Writing (Fall, Spring:3.0)

For Carroll School of Management students, the course is also available as BCOM6688.

This course is designed to expose students to the type of writing done on the job. It is a practical course where real-life examples are used to illustrate appropriate writing strategies, style, language and formats commonly found in a business setting. By the end of the semester, students will be proficient in producing business correspondence, instructions, reports, proposals, resumes, and presentation materials.

Randi Triant

ENGL4915 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (Spring:3.0)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required

This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors (not freshmen), who will be selected on the basis of manuscript submission. Students should submit up to 8 double-spaced pages of writing (your submission may be part of a larger piece; if so, indicate this on the manuscript), along with a paragraph explaining your interest in the course and a list of other college level writing workshops you have taken, with instructors and grades. Ideally, the writing sample will be fiction, but if your strongest writing is in creative non-fiction or poetry or drama, that is also acceptable, though prose is encouraged. Include your e-mail address. Materials should be submitted via email to Elizabeth Graver by no later than November 3 at 5 pm. Students will be notified by e-mail by November 11, 2016 as to whether or not they have been admitted to the course.

Elizabeth Graver

ENGL4917 Advanced Poetry Workshop (Spring:3.0)

This is a workshop for poets with some experience who wish to work intensively to improve their work. We will read each other’s poetry closely and learn to take risks from the risky poets of the past thirty years or so. We will write collaborative poems, individual poems in traditional forms, long poems, and poems in series. The grade is based on informed and enthusiastic class participation and on a chapbook/portfolio submitted at semester’s end. No application process.

John Anderson