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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Women's Literature, Gender Studies and Theories of Sexuality

english department

Spring 2017 Semester

ENGL2125 Introduction to Feminisms (Fall, Spring:3.0)
Cross Listed with: HIST2502, SOCY2225, COMM2225
Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

Andrew Owens

ENGL2125 Introduction to Feminisms (Fall, Spring:3.0)
Cross Listed with: HIST2502, SOCY2225, COMM2225

Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.
This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.
Andrew Owens

ENGL2204 Dangerous Women in Classical Myth (Spring:3.0)
Cross Listed with: CLAS2240

Demeter sticks a baby in the fire, Amazons cut off one breast and live far away from men, Clytemnestra kills her husband in his bath. In this course we will investigate how Greeks and Romans used stories about female figures - goddesses, monsters, and humans - as a way of talking about a range of conflicts, tensions, and fears. While we focus on the ancient world, we will also look at how these figures are used in later periods and think about which stories we tell about women - and why.

 

ENGL4352 Women In/And Avant-Garde (Spring:3.0)

The literary and visual avant-gardes are often perceived as a predominantly white male domain, its female practioners reduced to companion or Muse, or socially marginalized by race, sexual orientation or madness. In this course we will examine the construction of the concept "woman" by male avant-garde artists and writers in (Dada, Surrealism, Futurism), but our main focus will be on a selection of avant-garde works by women in poetry, prose narrative, critical manifesto, and the visual arts.

Robin Lydenberg

ENGL4393 Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries (Spring:3.0)
Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.
Satisfies the Women Writers requirement for LSOE.

In this class, we will read Jane Austen's six major novels through the lens of new historicism. Thinking about literature as social process, we will discuss the cultural work done by Austen and other writers of her era, such as Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Beth Kowaleski Wallace