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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Women's Literature, Gender Studies and Theories of Sexuality

english department

Spring 2018 Semester

ENGL2125 Introduction to Feminisms (Fall, Spring:3.0)
Cross Listed with: HIST2502, SOCY2225, COMM2225
Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.

ENGL2125 Introduction to Feminisms (Fall, Spring:3.0)
Cross Listed with: HIST2502, SOCY2225, COMM2225

Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.
This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.
Andrew Owens

ENGL4408 Towards the New Woman in British and Irish Victorian Fiction (Spring:3.0)

The late nineteenth century saw the flowering of the “New Woman” movement in fiction. It coincided to a degree with First-Wave feminism and the struggle for women’s suffrage. It had literary debts to contremporary writers such as the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen but also to women writers over the previous century from Maria Edgeworth to George Eliot. This course explores those roots while also attending to the work of some of the seminal New-Woman novelists themselves who came from Irish as well as British backgrounds. They include Olive Schreiner, Sarah Grand, Iota, Mona Caird and George Egerton.

James Murphy