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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

World Literature

English Electives Offered Fall 2017:

 

The course is open to students of any major and in any year. Its goals include: (1) exposure to a broad range of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew literature in translation (myths, histories, authors, characters, plots, themes); (2) attentiveness to what is at stake, theoretically and practically, in translation into English; and (3) the development of comparatist practices of reading that respect and explore cultural differences. Emphasis on the Homeric epics, Greek tragedies, the more conspicuously literary parts of the Hebrew Bible, and the metamorphoses of the Greek and Hebrew traditions in the Roman world during the transition to the Common Era.

Dayton Haskin

SLAV2162 Classics of Russian Literature (in translation) (Fall:3.0)
Cross Listed with: ENGL2227
Satisfies core requirement for: Literature. 
All readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian Major requirement
A survey of selected major works, authors, genres, and movements in nineteenth-century Russian literature, with emphasis on the classic works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.
Cynthia Simmons, Maxim D. Shrayer
SLAV2162 Classics of Russian Literature (in translation) (Fall:3.0)
Cross Listed with: ENGL2227
Satisfies core requirement for: Literature. 
All readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian Major requirement
A survey of selected major works, authors, genres, and movements in nineteenth-century Russian literature, with emphasis on the classic works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.
Cynthia Simmons, Maxim D. Shrayer
ENGL2110 Classical and Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature (Fall:3.0)

The course is open to students of any major and in any year. Its goals include: (1) exposure to a broad range of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew literature in translation (myths, histories, authors, characters, plots, themes); (2) attentiveness to what is at stake, theoretically and practically, in translation into English; and (3) the development of comparatist practices of reading that respect and explore cultural differences. Emphasis on the Homeric epics, Greek tragedies, the more conspicuously literary parts of the Hebrew Bible, and the metamorphoses of the Greek and Hebrew traditions in the Roman world during the transition to the Common Era.
Dayton Haskin

CLAS2230 Classical Mythology (Fall:3.0)
Cross Listed with: ENGL2220

This course explores the mythology of ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East within its cultural, political, historical, and religious contexts. You will meet (or renew your acquaintance with) mythical figures like Zeus, Gilgamesh, Medusa, and Helen as they appear in multiple literary genres and other artistic media. In order to analyze and interrogate these myths we will use ancient and modern frameworks for thinking about what mythology is and what it does. What can a myth tell us about the civilization that created, adopted, or adapted it? What do our uses of Classical mythology - and our creations of our own myths - tell us about ourselves?

Hanne Eisenfeld

Classics of Russian Literature (in translation) (Fall:3.0)
Cross Listed with: ENGL2227
Satisfies core requirement for: Literature

All readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian Major requirement

A survey of selected major works, authors, genres, and movements in nineteenth-century Russian literature, with emphasis on the classic works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.

Maxim D. Shrayer